Tag Archive: PSAHelpline


05 - 15

Aling Nelia is a housewife and a mother of five children.  On her 57th birthday, her kids pooled their resources and surprised her with a round-trip ticket to Hong Kong as it has always been her ardent dream to see the place.

She began working on the required documents while waiting for her passport application appointment at the DFA.  However, when she got hold of her PSA birth certificate, she realized that her name is misspelled on the document.  Her real name, and the name that she has used all her life, is Cornelia Pineda Mangosing, while the name written in her birth certificate is Cornelio Pineda Mangosing.

At first glance, it looked like all Aling Nelia had to do was file a petition for correction of a clerical error on her birth certificate.  After all, it was just one letter – “o” in Cornelio should be changed to “a” to make it Cornelia.  However, when she sought assistance from the Local Civil Registry, she was informed that it is not as simple as it seemed.

What is the difference between correction of clerical error and change of name?

A lot, actually.

Correction of clerical error is covered by R.A. 9048 where an error in a birth certificate is corrected without the need to file a case in court, hire a lawyer, and attend hearings.  The corrections are applied by the LCR where the birth was registered.  RA 9048 may be applied if the error or errors are clearly typhographical in nature – harmless and innocuous.  An evidence of which is that the name, in its erroneous form, sounds ridiculous and tainted with dishonor.

On the other hand, a name that was supposedly misspelled but is still acceptable as a name, may not always be considered misspelled and therefore, may not be covered by the provisions of RA 9048.  Correcting such kinds of entries in a birth certificate follows a different process.

Cornelio vs. Cornelia

Aling Nelia’s name, as far as she is concerned, is misspelled.  Her name is Cornelia, not Cornelio.  Her argument is valid and she has all the documents to prove her claim.  However, the supposed misspelled name, Cornelio, is in itself, a name!  Changing the last letter to make it Cornelia would mean just that – changing the name – not merely correcting the spelling.

What should be done then?

Aling Nelia may resort to have the correction applied through a judicial proceeding.  She needs to file a verified petition in the Regional Trial Court of her birth place or where the LCR is located.  The rest of the procedures she needs to follow are outlined in Rule 108 of the Rules of Court in order to apply the necessary “correction”.  This may be better explained to her by a lawyer.

It may seem strange to have to go through a rather complicated process when all Aling Nelia wanted was to set her records straight and align the name on her birth certificate with the name that she had been using all her life.  At this point, she actually has two options: she could have her name changed through a court proceeding, or simply adopt “Cornelio” being the registered name and drop “Cornelia”.  The latter, of course, would be a ridiculous choice.

This is another reminder for all of us to always be careful when accomplishing public documents such as Certificates of Live Birth, Marriage Certificates, and Death Certificates.  An honest mistake may lead to a string of complications that may affect important transactions such as passport applications and benefit claims.

If you have questions regarding your birth certificate or think that there might be an error you need to rectify, proceed to the LCR office where your birth was registered.  You may also drop us a line and we will do our best to find the most accurate answers for you.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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04 - 03

When a married couple separates, whether on their own terms or as prescribed by an annulment proceeding, child custody and support become a fundamental issue between the parties.  With whom should the children stay?  How often can their father / mother see them?  How will their basic needs be met?

In the Philippines, custody of children under seven years old is automatically granted to the mother as mandated by Article 213 of the Family Code.  This is applicable whether the child’s birthright is legitimate or illegitimate.  In the same manner, the father is expected to continue providing the needs of his children and not leave the mother to fend for the family on her own.

This arrangement is easier said than done as most post-annulment / separation issues stem from the fact that fathers fail to consistently provide for their children.  Each has his own reason for not being able to live up to what is expected of him (as the provider); others admit that they chose to discontinue financially supporting their children through the estranged wife because of trust issues.

In the midst of these marital (and extra-marital) issues are the children and their escalating living necessities.  This blog receives a lot of questions about child support and legal actions against fathers who fail to provide for their children.  We all have that one friend who is perpetually asking about means to compel her ex-husband to give and give more as the children’s basic needs rapidly become anything but basic.

We ran a research on child support, as dictated by Philippine laws, in an attempt to shed light in this touchy issue.  We hope these information help put your questions on child support to rest, or at least lead you towards the right decisions in upholding the rights of your children.

How much should a father give as financial support to his children?

According to the Family Code (Articles 194, 201, and 202):

Support comprises everything indispensable for sustenance, dwelling, clothing, medical attendance, education and transportation, in keeping with the financial capacity of the family.

The education of the person entitled to be supported referred to in the preceding paragraph shall include his schooling or training for some profession, trade, or vocation, even beyond the age of majority.  Transportation shall include expenses in going to and from school, or to and from place of work.

The amount of support, in the cases referred to in Articles 195 and 196, shall be in proportion to the resources or means of the giver and to the necessities of the recipient.

Support in the cases referred to in the preceding article shall be reduced or increased proportionately, according to the reduction or increase of the necessities of the recipient and the resources or means of the person obliged to furnish the same.

According to the Family Code:

  • The amount of support shall be based on the children’s needs and the father’s capacity to provide (earn).
  • The father is obligated to support his children’s education even after they have reached the age of emancipation.

Can I demand for support from my child’s father even if he is married to another woman (and my child, effectively, is illegitimate)?

Article 195 of the Family Code provides that both legitimate and illegitimate children have the right to receive financial support from their parents.  However, an illegitimate child’s right to support shall only arise if he was duly recognized by his father.

An illegitimate child may prove that he is recognized by his biological father through the following:

  1. Record of birth appearing in the civil register or a final judgment – with the father accomplishing the Affidavit of Acknowledgment / Admission of Paternity found at the back of his birth certificate.
  2. An admission of illegitimate filiation in a public document or a private handwritten instrument and signed by the parent concerned.

If the father refuses to recognize the child, the mother may seek to the court’s assistance by filing a Petition for Compulsory Recognition and Support.  This will entail hearings and other court proceedings and the mother must be prepared to fight it out in public.

If I win the petition, can I demand the father of my child to reimburse the expenses I incurred in the years that he did not provide for my child?

No; the father’s obligation to financially support the child begins from the date of judicial demand, or once the Petition for Compulsory Recognition and Support is approved by the court.

Do I have the right to demand for financial support from my ex-husband even if he is jobless?

In cases when the children’s father is jobless and has no means of income, financial support may be derived from the separate properties.  If the father does not have a separate property to liquidate, the funds may be taken from his and the children’s mother’s conjugal properties.  It shall be treated as an advance and will be deducted from the ex-husband’s share of the estate when it is liquidated.

Can I sue my ex-husband if he continues to ignore his parental responsibilities?

Filing a case in court to compel the children’s father to continue his obligation to provide for the children should be the last resort.  Yes, a mother can seek the court’s assistance in demanding for child support.  A father’s failure to comply with his obligation despite repeated reminders is a violation of RA 7610 (Special Protection of Children Against Abuse, Exploitation, and Discrimination Act, or RA 9262 – Anti-Violence Against Women and Their Children Act of 2004) and is a criminal offense.

Sources:

www.gov.ph

http://jlp-law.com

http://www.manilatimes.net

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02-13

The DFA will always refer to the authenticated copy of our PSA birth certificate for the accuracy and completeness of our names.  The name, and how it is written, on the birth certificate is what will appear on the passport.

Miguel Oben is an illegitimate child.  He has always used his mother’s last name as his surname (Oben); he leaves the middle name field blank in all of his documents and IDs.  When he applied for a passport, he was required to present a copy of his PSA birth certificate.  He was shocked to find that his name on his birth certificate is Miguel Villanueva Oben – Villanueva being his biological father’s last name!  He verified this against the copy of the LCR where his birth was registered and got the same results.  When he presented his birth certificate to the DFA, his passport application was denied.

What must be done in such cases?

Miguel was left with no choice but to have the issue on his birth certificate rectified at the Local Civil Registry where his birth was registered.  Since he is an illegitimate child and his father’s name does not appear on his birth certificate (except for his last name that somehow found its way to Miguel’s middle name field), he should continue carrying his mother’s last name while the middle name field must be left blank.

While waiting for the results from the Local Civil Registry (which could take between 6 months to a year), Miguel tried appealing his case to the DFA.  It turns out that he needs the passport to visit his mother who suffered a stroke in Guam, USA.  Luckily, he was able to support this claim with documents from his mother’s doctors.

Although it is not customary for the DFA to work around identity and documentary issues of passport applicants, there are certain cases when the application is reconsidered and additional documents are required.  Cases similar to Miguel’s may be required to present an Affidavit of One and The Same Person in support of the IDs and documents he presented bearing his name as Miguel Oben.  Apart from the said Affidavit, Miguel also attached a signed letter to the DFA stating that he shall be presenting the annotated copy of his birth certificate upon renewal of his passport.

Again, these kinds of issues are handled and evaluated by the DFA on a case-to-case basis.  The results of the evaluation are entirely up to the discretion of DFA’s experts.  At the end of the day, the public is expected to adhere to the policies of the DFA as published in their website and as posted in their offices.

Source: www.dfa.gov.ph

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02-08

A passport applicant was denied because her name on her birth certificate did not match any of the IDs and clearances she presented to the DFA.  Why is this so?

Janine’s parents’ marriage was annulled shortly after she turned one year old.  After the annulment, her mother immediately reverted to using her maiden last name.  Since the mother had sole custody of Janine, she decided to drop the father’s last name and had Janine use her maiden name in all of her records instead.

Now, at 34 years old, Janine applied for her passport (for the first time) and was shocked when she was told her application was denied.  According to the DFA, the name on her birth certificate and the names on the rest of her documents and IDs do not match.  And because of this, she needs to have her birth certificate amended first before her application could be entertained.

Janine was willing to just use her name as it appears on her birth certificate but they explained to her that this could not be done.  The DFA verifies a person’s identity against all of the documents and IDs required of an applicant and since her names do not match, they could not issue her a passport.

What are the requirements when applying for a passport for the first time?

  1. Personal appearance of applicant.
  2. Confirmed appointment
  3. Duly accomplished application form (may be downloaded from the DFA website).
  4. Birth Certificate in PSA Security Paper (SECPA) or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar (LCR) and duly authenticated by the PSA.
  5. Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity such as:
    • Government-issued picture IDs:
      • Digitized SSS ID
      • Driver’s License
      • GSIS E-card
      • PRC ID
      • IBP ID
      • OWWA ID
      • Digitized BIR ID
      • Senior Citizen’s ID
      • Unified Multi-purpose ID
      • Voter’s ID
      • Old College ID
      • Alumni ID
      • Old Employment IDs
    • And at least two of the following:
      • PSA Marriage Contract
      • Land Title
      • Seaman’s Book
      • Elementary or High School Form 137 or Transcript of Records with readable dry seal.
      • Government Service Record
      • NBI Clearance
      • Police Clearance
      • Barangay Clearance
      • Digitized Postal ID
      • Readable SSS-E1 Form or Microfilmed Copy of SSS E1 Form
      • Voter’s Certification, List of Voters and Voter’s Registration Record
      • School Yearbook

Janine presented her PSA Birth Certificate, her college IDs, her company ID, and her Voter’s ID.  Of the four, only her birth certificate shows her last name as that of her father’s while the rest were all her mother’s maiden last name.

She was advised to proceed to the Local Civil Registry where her birth was registered and inquire about the processes involved in changing her surname (as a result of the nullification of her parents’ marriage).  Once her birth certificate has been duly annotated with the necessary changes (on her last name), she may apply for her passport once again.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/index.php/2013-04-04-06-59-48

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02-07

A child born out of wedlock is an illegitimate child.  Under the law, such children shall carry their mother’s last name on their birth certificates unless their father provides his consent to let the child use his last name.  In cases when the parents of an illegitimate child decide to marry later on, the child’s status is effectively changed to “legitimate”.  And as a legitimzied child, he or she is given the same entitlements as that of a legitimate child, retroacting to the time of the child’s birth.  This includes the child’s right to use her father’s surname.

So how come “legitimized” children, who have been using their father’s last name since after their parents got married (after their birth), are still required to execute an AUSF (Affidavit to Use Surname of Father) if they want to use their father’s last name on their passports?  (Otherwise, their passports shall bear the last name of the mother as if their birth right is still illegitimate).

When a child is “legitimized”, certain procedures must be undertaken in order to apply the child’s father’s last name on the child’s birth certificate.  Unless the necessary amendments and attachments have been officially applied on the child’s birth certificate, her right to use her father’s last name may still be questioned.

When applying for a passport, the DFA requires a copy of the applicant’s PSA Birth Certificate.  This shall be their basis for the person’s information, including and most especially, the person’s name.  If the birth certificate is not supported by documents attesting to the fact that the person has been “legitimized”, he or she may not be able to use the father’s last name on his passport.

If you were legitimized (due to subsequent marriage of your parents), you need to accomplish the following in relation to your use of your father’s last name:

a. Visit the office of the Local Civil Registrar where your birth was registered and secure the following documents:

  • Affidavit of Paternity/Acknowledgment (certified photocopy)
  • Joint Affidavit of Legitimation
  • Certification of Registration of Legal Instrument (Affidavit of Legitimation)
  • Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate with remarks/annotation based on the legitimation by subsequent marriage.

b. Verify that the birth certificate (of the legitimated child) and the marriage contract of the parents have been certified by the PSA.  If not, secure it from the city or municipal Civil Registrar’s Office where the child was registered and where the parents were married.

When applying for a passport and you would like to use your father’s last name:

  • Bring a copy of your PSA Birth Certificate.
  • Check to make sure that your copy includes an annotation regarding your new status as legitimated.
  • If the legitimized child is still a minor, the mother must be present during the passport application.
  • If the mother is abroad, the person accompanying the child (including the father), must be able to execute the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.

A legitimized child may use her father’s last name on her passport provided her PSA Birth Certificate bears the necessary annotations regarding her legitimation and documented proof that the father has allowed the child to use his last name (AUSF, Affidavit of Support and Consent).

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

https://psa.gov.ph/content/application-requirements

http://www.manilatimes.net/illegitimate-child-has-to-use-mothers-surname/230283/

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02-06

Applying for your child’s first passport is one of the most important things you need to accomplish after securing the certification of his birth certificate and before he begins with school.  The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) prioritizes passport applications for children aged 7 years old and below.  Parents no longer need to secure an appointment in order to be accommodated; they will be attended to as long as they have the complete set of documents needed for passport application.  We released a blog on the list of requirements and processes involved when applying for a minor’s passport.

But what if the minor applicant is an illegitimate child?  Is there a different set of documentary requirements that the parent or parents need to prepare?  In the absence of the mother, can the father apply for the child’s passport?  What if the child’s mother is a minor as well, will the DFA honor her application for her child’s passport?

We ran a research on this specific subject on passport applications and would like to share what we gathered from the DFA website and other related sources.

General requirements for illegitimate minor applicants:

  1. Personal appearance of the minor applicant.
  2. Personal appearance of child’s mother and her valid IDs or valid passport.  If the child’s mother resides abroad, the applicant’s guardian must present the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent.
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.
    • If the mother is in the Philippines, she must appear before the DFA office in order for the passport application to be processed.  The above supporting documents are applicable only if the child’s guardians can show proof that the mother is residing abroad.
  3. If the child’s mother is likewise a minor:
    • Personal appearance of child’s mother (who is a minor) and the child’s maternal grandparent/s.
    • PSA Birth Certificate of minor applicant and mother (who is a minor).
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent executed by the maternal grandparent/s indicating the name of the traveling companion.
    • DSWD clearance if the minor child will be traveling with the person other than the maternal grandparents.
    • Proof of identity of mother and maternal grandparent/s.
  4. Original birth certificate of minor in Security Paper issued by the PSA or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar and duly authenticated by the PSA.
    • Transcribed Birth Certificate from the LCR is required when entries in the PSA Birth Certificate are blurry or unreadable.
    • Report of birth duly authenticated by PSA is required if minor was born abroad.
  5. Document of identity with photo, if the minor is 8-17 years old (for first time and renewal applicant) such as School ID or Form 137 with readable dry seal.
  6. For minor applicants who never attended school, a Notarized Affidavit of Explanation executed by the mother detailing the reasons why the child is not in school.
  7. Original and photocopy of valid passport of the person traveling with the minor.

Clearly, the only instance when the DFA would entertain passport applications for illegitimate minors filed by a person other than his mother is if the mother is not in the Philippines.  Otherwise, only the child’s mother may transact with the DFA in order to obtain a passport for the illegitimate child.

If the child’s mother is also a minor or is physically or mentally impaired, the child’s maternal grandparents are next in line as authorized individuals to apply for the minor child’s passport.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

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30

A most common issue encountered by Filipinos with their birth certificates are misspelled first, middle, or last names.  These can go from just a single misplaced letter to an entire unknown name that somehow made it to the person’s birth certificate by mistake.  If you need to have your name corrected or changed, you may do so at the city or municipality where your birth was registered.

Here is the list of requirements and fees when filing for an affidavit for clerical error and change of first name at the Quezon City Hall.  This is also otherwise known as Republic Act 9048.

Requirements for Clerical or Typographical Error:

  1. Certified true machine copy of the Certificate sought to be corrected.  Make three copies.
  2. Documents showing the correct entry/entries upon which the correction shall be based such as Baptismal Certificate, Voter’s ID, School Records, GSIS records, SSS records, medical records, business records.
  3. Other relevant documents as the Registrar may require.
  4. Filing Fee: PHP1,000 and additional service fee for Migrant Petitioner of PHP500.00.

Requirements for Change of First Name/Nickname:

  1. Certified true machine copy of the Certificate sought to be corrected.  Make three copies.
  2. Clearance from the following authorities (these are MANDATORY):
    • Clearance from Employer or Certification that the applicant has no pending case with the company (if employed).
    • Affidavit of No Employment (if the applicant is not employed).
    • NBI or PNP Clearance
    • Documents showing the correct entry/entries upon which the correction shall be based, such as: Baptismal Certificate, Voter’s ID, School records, GSIS records, SSS records, medical records, business records.
    • Other relevant documents as the Registrar may require.
  3. Filing fee: PHP3,000.00 and additional service fee for Migrant Petitioner of PHP1,000.00.

Applicants must proceed to the Civil Registry Department for further instructions.

Source:

http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-services/requirements-a-procedures/261-civilregguide

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26

A child’s birth must be registered at the city or municipal hall of the child’s birthplace within 30 days from the date of birth.  If parents fail to submit the necessary documents for registration, the child will not be issued a birth certificate until they file for a late registration.

Here are the documentary requirements when filing for late birth registration at the Quezon City Hall.  These are classified according the child’s birth right.

A. For Legitimate Children:

  • Original copy of the Baptismal Certificate
  • Certified True Copy of Marriage Contract

B. For Illegitimate Children:

  • Original copy of Baptismal Certificate
  • Joint Affidavit of two (2) disinterested persons

C. Acknowledgment through Documents (if father or mother or both parents are deceased):

  • Insurance
  • Report Card
  • Title of House and Lot
  • Certified True Copy of Death Certificate

Proceed to Counter 13 with the documents and wait for further instructions from the clerk.  A fee of PHP150 for late filing must be paid at the cashier.  You will also be informed when you may expect for the child’s birth certificate to be released for endorsement to the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) office.

Once certified by the PSA, you may request for a copy at any PSA branch.  Succeeding requests may already be done online via www.psahelpline.ph or by calling 02-737-1111 and have the birth certificate delivered to you.

Source: http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-services/requirements-a-procedures/261-civilregguide

Other related articles:

  1. How to File for Late Registration of Birth Certificate at the Manila City Hall
  2. Problems with NSO Birth Certificate: Delayed Registration of Birth

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11-03

When my uncle was granted citizenship in the U.S. by virtue of a petition filed by his daughter who is a natural born U. S. Citizen, he also elected to change his first name.  So from being a Jose Paulo de Guzman Asuncion, he is now Mark Arthur de Guzman Asuncion.

He recently celebrated his 65th birthday and is now taking an extended vacation in the Philippines.  He is technically “retired” from private employment in the U.S. but still has the option to continue working for smaller firms.

Last Monday, he requested me to help him order copies of his and my aunt’s birth certificates and two copies of their marriage certificate.  Of course, I ordered online at PSAHelpline.ph because I know they can get it done in 2 to 3 days max.  He told me to have it delivered to his home address in Quezon City and list him as the recipient.

I did as he requested and was able to successfully submit all orders in less than 15 minutes.  I went to a nearby 711 store to pay for the documents (yes! 711 accepts PSAHelpline.ph payments!) and told my uncle to just wait for the courier within the week.  I also reminded him to prepare his IDs as these will be asked of him before he receives the documents.

Later that evening while we were having dinner, my uncle showed me all the IDs he has in his envelope.  It was then that I realized that he no longer had any IDs that bore his old first name, Jose Paulo.  From his driver’s license, to his Senior Citizen ID, to his passport, he is identified as Mark Arthur De Guzman Asuncion.  Since he is declared as the owner of the ordered documents, and his name on his PSA birth certificate is Jose Paulo, he needs to show the courier a valid ID with his name listed as Jose Paulo.

We launched a major search operation in his old cabinets and desk drawers; I asked the helper to find any old IDs that do not have expiration dates and bear his name as Jose Paulo.  After turning his entire bedroom upside down, we finally saw one!  The last SSS ID he had before he left for the U.S. in 2002 was neatly kept in a box and still looked as good as new!  And, it does not have an expiration date!  Of course, his name on this ID is Jose Paulo De Guzman Asuncion.

When the PSAHelpline.ph courier arrived yesterday with the documents, my uncle was eagerly waiting by his porch with his SSS ID.  He handed this to the courier who carefully studied the ID and my uncle’s face.  The courier smiled and said: “Parang di po kayo tumatanda!”

So yes, you can use an old ID when receiving your ordered PSA documents, just as long as these are non-expiring IDs like your SSS.

My uncle, having stayed in the U.S. for 14 years, is used to quick, efficient, and hassle-free transactions.  And I must say that he was really impressed with the online ordering and delivery services of PSAHelpline.ph.  He could not believe how far the PSA has gone from being an overly crowded office with people lined up everywhere, to having an online portal where Pinoys can easily request for their documents and have these conveniently delivered wherever in the country.

He also loved being told that his photo on his old SSS ID looked like it was taken just yesterday.

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09-09

Kasama sa krusada ng Presidente ang gawing madali at simple ang mga government processes para makabawas sa dagdag na gastos ng mga Pinoy.  Bilang pag tugon sa panawagang ito, tinanggal na ang requirement ng Overseaas Employment Certificae (OEC) para sa mga kababayan nating OFW na nagbabakasyon sa bansa at babalik din sa dating employer, sa dating lugar na pinagta-trabahuhan.

Ito ay effective simula unang linggo ng September 2016.

Narito ang mga hakbang para mag qualify ang isang OFW sa OEC Exemption (sa ilalim ng Resolution No. 12 mula sa Governing Board of the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA):

  1. Mag register sa BM Online Facility bago ang araw ng flight pabalik sa ibang bansa ng OFW.  Libre ang registration.
  2. Ipapadala ng POEA ang impormasyon na makakalap mula sa registration ng OFW sa Bureau of Immigration (BI).  Ito ang gagamitin ng Immigration officer na basehan kung ang manggagawa ay qualified sa exemption.
  3. Kung makikitang hindi ka kwalipikado sa exemption, madi-direct ka sa BM Online Webpage kung saan kailangan mong muling mag register at mag set ng appointment sa POEA.
  4. Kung didiretso ka naman sa BI counter sa airport ngunit hindi ka nakapag register online, papupuntahin ka sa Labor Assistance Counter (LAC) para ma-evaluate.

Tandaan na ang mga kwalipikado lamang sa exemption ay ang mga sumusunod:

  • Mga OFW na pabalik sa dating employer at sa dating lugar ng pinagta-trabahuhan at may existing records sa POEA database.
  • Mga OFW na nabigyan ng trabaho sa pamamagitan ng Government Placement Branch o ng in-house recruitment facility ng POEA.

Kung qualified ka sa OEC exemption, hindi mo na din kailangang magbayad ng travel tax at terminal fee.  Siguraduhin lamang na maipapakita mo ang mga sumusunod na dokumento sa Tourism Infrastructure and Enterprise Zone Authority (TIEZA) at sa Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA):

  • Valid work visa
  • Work permit
  • Valid employment contract
  • Valid company ID
  • Recent payroll slip
  • Other equivalent documents

Kaya’t maligayang pagbabalik sa bansa at mapayapang byahe pabalik sa inyong mga trabaho, mga bayaning OFW!

Source: http://www.rappler.com/move-ph/balikbayan/142336-poea-oec-scrap-for-returning-ofws

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