Tag Archive: Problems with Birth Certificate


5 May 14

As mentioned in our previous blogs, there are three ways you can have the errors in your birth certificate corrected: by filing a petition for correction, going to court, or filing a supplemental report.

Today’s blog will tackle the birth certificate errors that can be corrected by supplemental reports.

What birth certificate errors need a Supplemental Report?

  1. No first name, middle name, or last name (legitimate).
  2. No middle name (if the owner is illegitimate and acknowledged by the father).
  3. The first name on the birth certificate is written as Baby Boy, Baby Girl, Boy, or Girl and the child was born before 1993.
  4. No check mark for gender/there are check marks for both genders.
  5. The illegitimate child wants to use the father’s surname. Take note that this correction only involves the surname. Changing status to legitimate or illegitimate requires court order/proceeding.

How to file for a Supplementary Report

  1. Prepare an affidavit by indicating the missing detail entry of the birth certificate owner;
  2. Include the reasons why the field was left blank in the birth certificate;
  3. Prepare other supporting documents that could help in your petition, such as medical records, school records, etc.

Submit your petition to the Local Civil Registry Office of the city or municipality where the birth was registered.  If the birth certificate owner was born abroad, he can file the petition at the Philippine Consulate where the birth was reported.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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2 Feb 19

Another common birth certificate error involves the owner’s last name (family name).  This could either be blurred, misspelled, or missing (especially if the child is illegitimate).  Unlike first and middle names, correcting the last name can be complicated as some cases require the intervention of a lawyer or a court proceeding.

Today, we are going to feature four cases of last name issues on a birth certificate and how each can be addressed.

  1. Blurred Last Name

Solution 1: If the record of PSA is blurred, you may request the Local Civil Registrar to endorse a copy of your birth certificate with a clearer entry in the last name to the PSA.

Solution 2: If the record of the PSA and the civil registry are both blurred, file a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.

Supporting Documents:

  • Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  • Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business records, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  • Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  • Payment of One Thousand Pesos (Php 1,000) as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50.00 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  • Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.
  1. Misspelled Last Name

If the cause of the error is clearly typographical, causing the last name to look and sound foolish, this can be corrected by filing a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.

Supporting Documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  3. Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  4. Payment of One Thousand Pesos (Php 1,000) as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

  1. No Last Name

If the last name in the birth certificate is blank, a supplemental report should be filed to supply the missing entry.

To supply the missing entry, an affidavit indicating the entry missed in the registration and the reasons why there was a failure in supplying the required entry.  Supporting documents should be provided to show the name of the child.

Supporting Documents:

To supply the missing entry, an affidavit indicating the entry missed in the registration and the reasons why there was a failure in supplying the required entry.  Other supporting documents should be provided to show the first name of the child.

Take note that the LCR or the PSA will advise you of the best course to take when having your birth certificate entries corrected, especially when the error involves your last name.  Always remember that there is a very big possibility that you will be endorsed to a lawyer and a court proceeding may be required to apply the needed corrections.

Reference: http://www.psa.gov.ph/

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1 jan 14

The President signed the Telecommuting Act a few days before Christmas day last year.  Telecommuting is a work arrangement where employees are allowed to perform their tasks outside of the office, often from home, or a location close to home.  One only needs to have a stable internet connection, a laptop, and a mobile phone – equipment that will help him deliver his assignments as if he were working in an office.  It is called telecommuting because instead of traveling to the office, you now only travel (or commute) via telecommunication links such as phone, email, or video conferencing.

Now some of us may have already done this in the past – I know I have!  That is why I am glad that telecommuting is now an official policy that all private companies and businesses can implement.

The law, now known as Republic Act 11165, provides employers the option to have their workers perform their jobs from home on a voluntary basis.  As mentioned above, this is nothing new to Manila-based employees and maybe to some who work in private establishments based in the provinces.  Unbeknownst to us, telecommuting is a widely accepted work policy in other parts of the world.  Below are some interesting facts we gathered from the GlobalWorkplaceAnalytics.com and FlexJobs.com regarding telecommuting:

  • About 4.3 million employees worldwide (3.2% of the workforce) now work from home at least half the time.
  • Some Fortune 1000 companies have ‘face-lifted’ their office interiors to consider the fact that most, if not all, employees will be working outside of their building at one point.

Aren’t you glad telecommuting has finally been turned into law in our country this year?

While we wait for the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of this law, we summarized four important things we all need to know and understand the Telecommuting Act:

  1. Private business and company employers can offer their employees the telecommuting program on a voluntary basis.
  2. The work-from-home arrangement between the employer and his employees must be made based on minimum labor standards.  All work hours (within the work-from-home agreement) must be properly logged, monitored, and compensated.
  3. All other wage policies apply to the work rendered in telecommuting such as overtime, rest days, and leave entitlements.  They must also be given night shift differentials, regular holidays, and special non-working holidays.
  4. Their workload must still be corresponding to their job description, not more than (or less than) what their contemporaries at the office are assigned with.  They should be provided with proper training and afforded the same career development opportunities.

The telecommuting scheme will be tested by the DOLE through a pilot program for selected industries.  The test will not last more than 3 years.

What are your thoughts on this new labor law?  We’d be glad to hear from you!

Sources:

www.rappler.com

www.usnews.com

www.globalworkplaceanalytics.com

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10 - 23

About 15 years ago when I first worked on my passport application, I got overwhelmed with all the documents and IDs I needed to prepare.  I thought to myself, if this is how complicated the process is, how can senior citizens, PWDs, and other citizens with special needs and cases manage to get everything done.

A lot has changed since the first time I applied for a passport (and have only been renewing my passport ever since.  Passport renewals are simpler than applying for the first time).  And now that I have been given the facility to help and reach out to others, I decided to come up with a quick guide on the general requirements, fees, and turn-around-time for the applicants to receive their passports.

Save this article in your bookmarks to serve as your ready reference when you or a family member, friend, or even a total stranger asks for the basics when applying for a Philippine passport.

Read on!

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

  1. Personal appearance of applicant.
  2. Confirmed appointment.  You may set an appointment at www.passport.gov.ph/appointment
  3. Accomplished application form.  You may download a copy at www.dfa.gov.ph
  4. PSA-issued Birth Certificate.  You may order for a copy of your PSA documents at www.psahelpline.ph
  5. Government-issued picture ID with photocopy.
  6. Supporting documents and IDs.  You may check the list of acceptable documents and IDs here: http://dfa.gov.ph/images/OCA/Forms/RequirementsForPassportApplication.pdf

FEES AND PROCESSING TIME

  1. Express processing fee – P1,200

Ideal processing time is:

    • 7 working days for Metro Manila applicants
    • 10 working days outside Metro Manila.
    • The stated processing period does not include the delivery time.

     2. Regular processing fee – P950

Processing time is:

  • 20 working days for Metro Manila applicants
  • 30 working days outside Metro Manila.
  • The stated processing period does not include the delivery time.

VALID IDs

The DFA accepts any one of the following:

  1. Digitized SSS ID
  2. Driver’s License
  3. GSIS E-card
  4. PRC ID
  5. IBP ID
  6. OWWA ID
  7. Digitized BIR ID
  8. Senior Citizen’s ID
  9. Unified Multi-purpose ID (UMID)
  10. Voter’s ID
  11. Old College ID
  12. Alumni ID
  13. Employment ID

FOR APPLICANTS WHO DO NOT HAVE ANY BIRTH RECORD

  1. If born in or after January 1, 1950:
    • All general requirements listed above.
    • Apply for the delayed registration of birth at the local civil registry office at the applicant’s place of birth.
    • Submit the following documents:
  2. Born in or before December 31, 1949:
    • All general requirements as listed above.
    • Certificate of Non-availability of Record from the Philippine Statistics Authority.
    • Notarized Joint Birth Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons.
    • Any public document with the correct full name, and date and place of birth such as:
      • Baptismal certificate with readable dry seal.
      • National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) Certificate with photo and readable dry seal (for Muslim applicants).

FOR APPLICANTS WHO HAVE BEEN NATURALIZED

  1. All general requirements as listed above.
  2. Identification Certificate of Naturalization
  3. Oath of Allegiance.

Note that the DFA may require additional documents and IDs, especially if the applicant is a minor, adopted, traveling without his parents, and many other cases involving legitimacy, age, and physical condition of the minor or the traveler.  It would be best to be ready with the above documents as these are the basic requirements when applying for a passport.  Preparing these in advance will help you save time, effort, and money.

For more information on passport application, you may visit the DFA’s website at www.dfa.gov.ph

Reference:

www.dfa.gov.ph

 

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