Tag Archive: Birth Certificate


06 - 05 (2)

Minerva was already 23 years old when she learned that her father is married with children before she was born.  She learned about it the hard way – when she landed her first job, her supervisor turned out to be her father’s eldest son from his previous marriage, making him her half-brother.

She did her research and found out that her father’s marriage with his previous wife is still in effect; he had not filed for an annulment and in fact, has been sending financial support for his children while staying with Minerva and her mom!

What proved to be more difficult and confusing for Minerva is the fact that her status in her birth certificate is ‘Legitimated’ (due to subsequent marriage).  As far as she knows, she was born before her father (who was presumed to be single then) and mother were ‘married’.  They got married when Minerva was 7 years old, she even stood as flower girl during their wedding!

Now that it looks like her father is not even legally capable of ‘marrying’ her mother in the first place, what does that make of her ‘legitimation’?

What is ‘Legitimation’?

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website, legitimation is a remedy by means of which those who in fact were not born in wedlock and should, therefore, be considered illegitimate, are by fiction, considered legitimate, it being supposed that they were born when their parents were already validly married.

Who can be ‘Legitimated’?

Legitimation may be done for children who were conceived before their biological parents were married, provided that their parents were not disqualified by any impediments to marry each other.

For a child to be considered legitimated by subsequent marriage, it is necessary that:

  • The parents could have legally contracted marriage at the time the child was conceived;
  • That the child has been acknowledged by the parents before or after the celebration of their marriage; and
  • The acknowledgment was made with the consent of the child, if age or with the approval of the court, if a minor, unless it has been made in the certificate before a court of record, or in any authentic writing.

In all aspects, Minerva’s legitimation would have been legal and binding except for the fact that her father is married to another woman at the time he ‘married’ Minerva’s mother.  Effectively, this invalidates Minerva’s legitimation because the marriage between her parents is invalid.  In fact, she is not even qualified for legitimation.

Can a legitimation be cancelled?

Yes it can be cancelled by filing a petition for cancellation before the court where the petitioner’s birth certificate was registered.  The petitioner will need the assistance and guidance of a lawyer.  When approved, the civil registrar shall again annotate in the birth certificate that the ‘legitimation’ (also a previous annotation) is hereby cancelled.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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05 - 29

The Philippines is the bastion of Christianity in Asia with over 93% of our population listed as Christians; we ranked 5th worldwide according to a 2011 report of the Philippine Daily Inquirer.  Filipinos take religiosity pretty seriously.  To us, it is not just some form of affiliation or membership, it is a legacy passed on to us, an identity we must protect and preserve at all costs.

And so it IS a big deal to have to find out that your religion, as written in your birth certificate, is anything but Catholic or Christian. 

Such was the case of Arabah Joy Quinto, a Roman Catholic by birth.  After receiving an Exchange Scholar grant from her high school, she immediately applied for a passport at the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA).  She thought she had all the needed documents prepared until she was required to submit a certificate from the Office of Muslim Affairs (OMA)!  Apparently, her birth certificate shows that her parents are Muslims.  She insisted that her entire family has always been devout Roman Catholics, all of them baptized by the Catholic Church as supported by their birth certificates.  The DFA would have none of it; either she presents the required OMA or have the entries in her birth certificate corrected.

How to Correct a ‘Wrong Religion’?

There are two ways of rectifying incorrect entries in a birth certificate:

  1. Under RA No. 9048 or Clerical Error Law (as amended by RA 10172) if the matter involved correcting typographical errors in the First Name, Place of Birth, Day and month of Birth , or Gender.
  2. Through a petition in court if the correction is not covered by any of the above cases.

Correcting the entries in ‘Religion’ is not included in the errors covered by RA 9048 or 10172.

In this case, Arabah Joy needs to file a petition for Correction of Entry in the Regional Trial Court of the place where her birth was registered.  Once filed, the court shall set the case for a hearing, followed by publication of the correction in a local newspaper.

As soon as the petition is granted, the LCR of Arabah’s birth place will receive a certified copy of the court’s decision.  The LCR will be directed to apply the necessary annotations on Arabah’s birth certificate, so that the same shall now reflect her parents’ correct religion.

The first corrected copy of Arabah’s birth certificate may be requested from a PSA office while succeeding copies may be ordered online at www.psahelpline.ph

If you have questions about civil registration in the Philippines, please feel free to drop usa  line and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Sources:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.gov.ph (The Family Code of the Philippines)

www.manilatimes.net

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05 - 03

“Noong ‘80s, nakakuha ako ng kopya ng NSO birth certificate ko.  Ngayon, nag request ulit ako, sabi sa akin ‘No Name’ na daw ako!  Bakit nawala yung record ko eh meron na nga dati?”

This is a common confusion among us Pinoys when we are told that we “have a problem with our birth certificate”.  When we hear the word “no”, we automatically think that we do not have a record with the PSA (formerly NSO).

We received the above question from a follower and took it upon ourselves to clarify the matter for everyone’s benefit.  It is important that we are all aware of the differences in our concerns with our birth certificates so we would also know the most effective and efficient solution we could apply.

Below is a summary of the most common birth certificate issues encountered by Pinoys and the prescribed solution for each:

BIRTH CERTIFICATE PROBLEM WHAT THIS MEANS SOLUTION
1. No Record of Birth Certificate The PSA does not have a copy or record of your birth certificate because:

A. Your parents failed to register your birth at the LCR. Or

B. The LCR where your birth was registered failed to submit your birth certificate to the PSA for certification.

C. You were born during or shortly after WW2 when most birth records were destroyed or misplaced.

For scenarios A and C: Submit an Affidavit for Delayed Registration of birth at the LCR of your birth place.  Read this article for the complete list of requirements for Delayed Registration.

For scenarios B: Advise the LCR to endorse your Certificate of Live Birth to the PSA for proper certification.

 

2. Misspelled First Name One or two letters were mistyped that may result to one of two things:

A. Correcting the mistyped letters will confirm your real name, or

b. Correcting the mistyped letters will give you a new name (e.g. Rachelle is the correct spelling but your name is typed as Rochelle).

For scenario A: File an Affidavit for Clerical Error at the LCR where your birth was registered.

For scenario B: The LCR will advise you if you still need to undergo court proceedings as well as other fees you may need to pay (as the case may be treated as “change of name” instead of “clerical error”.)

 

3. “Baby Boy” and “Baby Girl” in first name field The phrases “Baby Boy” and “Baby Girl” were typed in the first name field and is now considered the person’s first name.
  • If born before 1993, file a supplemental report at the LCR.
  • If born on 1993 onwards, file a petition for change of name under RA 9048 at the LCR of the child’s birthplace.
4. Misspelled Middle Name One or two letters of your middle name were mistyped.

The solution depends on the marital status of the petitioner

A. If the petitioner is SINGLE:

  • Bring a copy of your mother’s PSA birth certificate to the LCR of your birth place.
  • If mother is deceased, bring a copy of her PSA death certificate.

B. If the petitioner is MARRIED:

  • Include a copy of your PSA marriage certificate.

File your petition for correction at the LCR where your birth was registered.

5. No Name on Birth Certificate First name field in child’s birth certificate is blank. File a supplemental report at the LCR of the child’s birth place to supply the missing entry.
6. Wrong Gender Gender written in birth certificate is the opposite of the owner’s actual gender. This is considered a clerical error and may be rectified by filing a Petition for clerical or typographical error.
7. Birth Certificate is unreadable or blurry Entries in your birth certificate are hard to read because the texts are smudged or the prints have faded over time.
  • Check if the LCR has a clearer copy of your birth certificate.  If they do, you can request for that copy to be forwarded to PSA for certification.
  • If they don’t, you may request the LCR for a reconstruction of your birth certificate.
8. Problems with Entries in Birth Place field A. Only the name of the hospital is indicated in the birth place field.

B. There are no entries in the birth place field.

C. The birth place written in your birth certificate is incorrect

  • Bring 2 copies of the latest LCR and PSA copies of birth certificate to be corrected to the LCR.
  • Bring a certification from the hospital where you were born; certificate must bear the hospital’s address.
  • If the hospital is no longer in business, submit a certificate from the barangay to prove that the hospital used to be established in the area.
  • School records of petitioner
  • Voter’s registration records
  • Latest community tax certificate from place of residence or place or work.
9. Incorrect Birth Date A. Month, day, or year of birth is incorrect.
  • Corrections for Month and Date fall under RA 9048 and are considered clerical errors.  Owner may file a Petition for Correction at the LCR where birth was registered.
  • Incorrect birth year needs to undergo court proceedings.

Parents and guardians are strongly encouraged to double check all entries in a child’s birth certificate before submitting the document for registration.  Once this is made official by the LCR, you might have a difficult time applying corrections on entries overlooked prior to submission; some errors might even entail cost.

Keep following our page for more useful and informative articles about our PSA documents.

Reference: www.psa.gov

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04 - 26 (1)

I came across this interesting article on yet another case of a defective NSO-certified (now PSA) birth certificate.  The writer narrated how his grandson’s passport application was denied because the kid’s birth certificate lacked the proper entries in the birthplace field.  To get the matter straightened out, the birth certificate owner needs to seek the assistance of the Civil Registry of Manila, wait for four months, and pay (exorbitant) fees.  All because a government employee supposedly neglected double-checking the entries on the child’s birth certificate before having it officially registered and submitted to the PSA.

The taxpayer in me wants to simply believe that the LCR employee who handled the filing of the child’s birth certificate is entirely at fault.  After all, it is part of their job to go over the entries in the document before making it official.

The former government employee in me (not from the LCR though) wants to think otherwise.

The fact remains that the Certificate of Live Birth, which is handed to the parents or relatives of the newborn child, either by a hospital staff, the midwife, or right at the LCR office, is accomplished in the presence of the parents or relatives.  They are then given enough time to review the contents of the document (30 calendar days from the date of birth), and when satisfied, affix their signatures at the bottom of the page, before this is submitted to the LCR and to the PSA.

How then are LCR employees accountable for erroneous entries on birth certificates when all they actually do is receive and file the documents for authentication of the PSA?

The Certificate of Live Birth is an official, public document similar with other forms we fill out at banks, schools, and government offices.  We are expected to provide our most accurate and updated information when filling out these forms to ensure that our transactions are processed seamlessly.  We do not let other people accomplish these documents for us.

We should treat our children’s Certificates of Live Birth the same way, bearing in mind that all information we allow to be written on this document shall serve as our children’s lifelong records, to be used as references of their identification and family history.  Oversights and errors will definitely cause them unnecessary delays and expenses in the future.

We wish to thank the article’s writer for sharing his experience; may we all learn a thing or two from this incident and take it upon ourselves to ascertain that our family’s civil registry documents are filled out accurately.

Because at the end of the day, you have no one else to blame for errors on your children’s birth certificates, except yourself.

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04 - 18

Filipinos like using nicknames.  We give our children unique sounding names such as ‘Jun-Jun’, ‘Ken-Ken’, and ‘Mac-Mac’.  Girls are named ‘Ging-Ging’, ‘Che-Che’, and sometimes, ‘Pot-Pot’.  Every family has a Tito Boy and a Tita Baby, a Kuya Boyet and an Ate Mayet, a Tito Tito or a Tita Tita.  Very seldom are we called by our real names.  When our parents call us by our complete names, we know we are in serious trouble.

While nicknames are fun and easy to remember, it has also caused problems for some.  Are there limitations to one’s use of his aliases?  When is it unlawful to use your nickname in public?  Did you know that there a lot of laws that touch on the use of nicknames and aliases?

Here is a list of Philippine laws that deal with an individual’s use of nicknames and aliases.  It pays to be properly informed because ignorance of the law excuses no one.  Don’t let your nickname get you in serious trouble.

What is a nickname or alias?

These are names we use publicly and habitually apart from our real names registered at birth or during baptism.  Any other name or names used by a person to distinguish himself other than his given name is called an alias (or aliases if the person has several).

Are nicknames or aliases allowed by law?

While Filipinos are not prohibited from using nicknames, there is a law that regulates the use of names other than one’s given name.  Commonwealth Act No. 142 (an Act to Regulate the Use of Aliases) was primarily intended to discourage the common practice among Chinese nationals who use different names and aliases in their business transactions.

Is the use of an alias in a business transaction or a public document automatically considered unlawful?

No.  Under the said Commonwealth Act, the use of a nickname or alias in a single instance without any indication that the user intends to be known by this name in addition to his real name does not fall within the prohibition.

The use of a nickname becomes illegal when it is meant to conceal or mislead, as detailed in the following laws involving false names and identities:

  1. The Anti-money Laundering Act of 2002 (Republic Act No. 9160, as amended), which requires banks and other covered institutions to establish and record the true identity of their clients based on official documents.
  2. The Revised Penal Code which penalizes the public use of a fictitious name for the purpose of concealing a crime or evading the execution of a judgment.
  3. The Civil Code of the Philippines which prohibits the use of different names and surnames, except for pen and stage names (usually observed among celebrities, authors, and the like).
  4. The Philippine Immigration Act of 1940 which penalizes any individual who shall evade the Immigration Laws by appearing under an assumed or fictitious name.
  5. The Tax Reform Act of 1997 which made it unlawful for any person to enter any false or fictitious name in a taxpayer’s books of accounts or records.
  6. Presidential Decree No. 1829 which penalizes any person who shall obstruct, impede, frustrate, or delay the apprehension of suspects by publicly using a fictitious name for the purpose of concealing a crime.
  7. Commonwealth Act 142 which penalizes any person who shall use any name different from the one with which he was registered at birth in the office of the local civil registry.

Nicknames and aliases is also one of the most common reasons why most Filipinos encounter problems with their birth certificates. By habitually using nicknames on public documents, they end up being listed under these aliases, contradicting the names written on their birth certificates.  This becomes a problem when the person applies for a passport, a license, or even when getting married.

Think twice before deciding to write your nickname on a public document.  Be careful you do not bring yourself unnecessary trouble by using a name you have been called since you were a kid.  Always choose to write your full name as written on your birth certificate.

Source: http://jlp-law.com/blog/when-the-use-of-aliases-violates-the-law/

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03-06

Of all the questions and clarifications we regularly receive through this blog, changing the last name of an illegitimate child tops our list.  These questions often come from single moms who either:

  1. Gave their maiden last name to their illegitimate child and now wants the child to use the last name of the biological father;
  2. Gave their maiden last name to their illegitimate child and now wants the child to use the last name of the adoptive father;
  3. Gave the biological father’s last name to the illegitimate child and now wants the father’s last name dropped from the child’s name and replace it with her last name.

Today’s blog shall focus on these three circumstances and how the processes of achieving the desired results differ from each other.  If you are about to become a single mom, this article may help you in deciding whose last name your child should carry.

What does the Family Code say about illegitimate children?

According to Executive Order No. 209, otherwise known as the Family Code of the Philippines, illegitimate children are children conceived and born outside a valid marriage (Art. 164).  Under the same E.O., illegitimate children shall use the surname and shall be under the parental authority of their mother. (Art. 176).

In 2004 however, Article 176 was amended by virtue of R.A. 9255.  The new law allows illegitimate children to use the surname of their biological father, provided that the father acknowledges his paternity over the child.

How does this new law affect the three cases of changing the last name of illegitimate children?

Before R.A. 9255 took effect, an illegitimate child shall carry its mother’s last name (while the middle name field is left blank) until the biological parents marry and the child is subsequently legitimated.  With the amendment of Article 176 (of R.A. 209), single mothers (and fathers!) now have the option to have the child carry the biological father’s last name in their birth certificates.

a. If an illegitimate child, carrying his mother’s maiden last name, wants to start using his father’s last name, he needs to execute a document, private or public, where he is recognized by his father as his child.  Such documents may be:

  • The affidavit found at the back of the Certificate of Live Birth (COLB); or
  • A separate PUBLIC document executed by the father, expressly recognizing the child as his.  The document should be handwritten and signed by the father; or
  • A separate PRIVATE handwritten instrument such as the Affidavit to Use the Surname of the Father (AUSF).  Note that the AUSF is used when the birth has been registered under the mother’s surname, with or without the father’s recognition.

b. If an illegitimate child, carrying his mother’s maiden last name, wants to use the last name of his adoptive father.

  • This shall follow the process of legal adoption.

c. If the single mother wants to drop the last name of the illegitimate child’s biological father from the child’s birth certificate.

  • This is a relatively new scenario that may have surfaced after R.A. 9255 took effect.  When unmarried parents decide to let the child use the father’s last name and then separate later on, the single mother may soon decide that her child’s birth certificate is better off without her ex-partner’s name on it.
  • This case needs to undergo court hearing and the results are entirely dependent on how the proceedings will go.  This may also entail more costs, time, and effort before a favorable result is achieved.

While the said amendment gives parents the liberty to let their illegitimate child carry the biological father’s name (or any other man’s name for that matter, as long as he is willing to let his last name be used by the child), it also opens opportunities for problems on the child’s birth certificate when the mother and the father do not end up marrying each other.  Keep in mind that after a child’s birth certificate has been duly registered at the LCR and a copy has been released to the PSA, any changes, especially those affecting the child’s last name, may prove to be more complicated than we would care to admit.

What is a single parent’s best recourse in order to avoid problems on the child’s last name?

If we are to base our answer on the above scenarios, then the best option would be for a single mother to simply let her child use her maiden last name, sans the middle name.  This leaves enough room for changes later on, minus the hassle of a court order.

a. If the child is using his mother’s maiden name, he can easily adopt his biological father’s last name in case his parents marry later on;

b. If the child’s mother marries a different man, the stepfather may simply adopt the child and give the child the legal right to carry his name.  Without adoption, the child is free to carry his mother’s maiden last name.

This is merely a personal opinion based solely on the numerous cases of dropping the last name of an illegitimate child due to unforeseen circumstances between his unmarried parents.  You are free to choose the option you deem best and applicable to your situation.  As an additional option, consider it best to consult a lawyer who may be able to provide you with professional advise on your situation.

Reference: http://www.psa.gov.ph

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02-07

A child born out of wedlock is an illegitimate child.  Under the law, such children shall carry their mother’s last name on their birth certificates unless their father provides his consent to let the child use his last name.  In cases when the parents of an illegitimate child decide to marry later on, the child’s status is effectively changed to “legitimate”.  And as a legitimzied child, he or she is given the same entitlements as that of a legitimate child, retroacting to the time of the child’s birth.  This includes the child’s right to use her father’s surname.

So how come “legitimized” children, who have been using their father’s last name since after their parents got married (after their birth), are still required to execute an AUSF (Affidavit to Use Surname of Father) if they want to use their father’s last name on their passports?  (Otherwise, their passports shall bear the last name of the mother as if their birth right is still illegitimate).

When a child is “legitimized”, certain procedures must be undertaken in order to apply the child’s father’s last name on the child’s birth certificate.  Unless the necessary amendments and attachments have been officially applied on the child’s birth certificate, her right to use her father’s last name may still be questioned.

When applying for a passport, the DFA requires a copy of the applicant’s PSA Birth Certificate.  This shall be their basis for the person’s information, including and most especially, the person’s name.  If the birth certificate is not supported by documents attesting to the fact that the person has been “legitimized”, he or she may not be able to use the father’s last name on his passport.

If you were legitimized (due to subsequent marriage of your parents), you need to accomplish the following in relation to your use of your father’s last name:

a. Visit the office of the Local Civil Registrar where your birth was registered and secure the following documents:

  • Affidavit of Paternity/Acknowledgment (certified photocopy)
  • Joint Affidavit of Legitimation
  • Certification of Registration of Legal Instrument (Affidavit of Legitimation)
  • Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate with remarks/annotation based on the legitimation by subsequent marriage.

b. Verify that the birth certificate (of the legitimated child) and the marriage contract of the parents have been certified by the PSA.  If not, secure it from the city or municipal Civil Registrar’s Office where the child was registered and where the parents were married.

When applying for a passport and you would like to use your father’s last name:

  • Bring a copy of your PSA Birth Certificate.
  • Check to make sure that your copy includes an annotation regarding your new status as legitimated.
  • If the legitimized child is still a minor, the mother must be present during the passport application.
  • If the mother is abroad, the person accompanying the child (including the father), must be able to execute the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.

A legitimized child may use her father’s last name on her passport provided her PSA Birth Certificate bears the necessary annotations regarding her legitimation and documented proof that the father has allowed the child to use his last name (AUSF, Affidavit of Support and Consent).

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

https://psa.gov.ph/content/application-requirements

http://www.manilatimes.net/illegitimate-child-has-to-use-mothers-surname/230283/

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02-06

Applying for your child’s first passport is one of the most important things you need to accomplish after securing the certification of his birth certificate and before he begins with school.  The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) prioritizes passport applications for children aged 7 years old and below.  Parents no longer need to secure an appointment in order to be accommodated; they will be attended to as long as they have the complete set of documents needed for passport application.  We released a blog on the list of requirements and processes involved when applying for a minor’s passport.

But what if the minor applicant is an illegitimate child?  Is there a different set of documentary requirements that the parent or parents need to prepare?  In the absence of the mother, can the father apply for the child’s passport?  What if the child’s mother is a minor as well, will the DFA honor her application for her child’s passport?

We ran a research on this specific subject on passport applications and would like to share what we gathered from the DFA website and other related sources.

General requirements for illegitimate minor applicants:

  1. Personal appearance of the minor applicant.
  2. Personal appearance of child’s mother and her valid IDs or valid passport.  If the child’s mother resides abroad, the applicant’s guardian must present the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent.
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.
    • If the mother is in the Philippines, she must appear before the DFA office in order for the passport application to be processed.  The above supporting documents are applicable only if the child’s guardians can show proof that the mother is residing abroad.
  3. If the child’s mother is likewise a minor:
    • Personal appearance of child’s mother (who is a minor) and the child’s maternal grandparent/s.
    • PSA Birth Certificate of minor applicant and mother (who is a minor).
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent executed by the maternal grandparent/s indicating the name of the traveling companion.
    • DSWD clearance if the minor child will be traveling with the person other than the maternal grandparents.
    • Proof of identity of mother and maternal grandparent/s.
  4. Original birth certificate of minor in Security Paper issued by the PSA or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar and duly authenticated by the PSA.
    • Transcribed Birth Certificate from the LCR is required when entries in the PSA Birth Certificate are blurry or unreadable.
    • Report of birth duly authenticated by PSA is required if minor was born abroad.
  5. Document of identity with photo, if the minor is 8-17 years old (for first time and renewal applicant) such as School ID or Form 137 with readable dry seal.
  6. For minor applicants who never attended school, a Notarized Affidavit of Explanation executed by the mother detailing the reasons why the child is not in school.
  7. Original and photocopy of valid passport of the person traveling with the minor.

Clearly, the only instance when the DFA would entertain passport applications for illegitimate minors filed by a person other than his mother is if the mother is not in the Philippines.  Otherwise, only the child’s mother may transact with the DFA in order to obtain a passport for the illegitimate child.

If the child’s mother is also a minor or is physically or mentally impaired, the child’s maternal grandparents are next in line as authorized individuals to apply for the minor child’s passport.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

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31

Parents who have children born before they were married can have their children legitimized by executing an Affidavit of Legitimation.  This must be submitted to the Office of the Civil Registrar of the child’s birthplace.  Court decrees, on the other hand, are legal instruments concerning the status of a person such as Admission of Paternity, Legitimation, Affidavit to Use the Surname of the Father (AUSF), and the like.

Registration of court decrees as well as requests for CTCs of annulment, adoption, correction of entry, change of name, presumptive death, and the like are handled at Counter 7 of the Quezon City Hall.  On the other hand, Court Decrees with finality and annotation as well as Legitimation papers must be submitted to Counter 15.

The following are the requirements when filing for Legitimation at the Quezon City Hall as well as the fees to be paid for other cases such as annulment of marriage, adoption, etc.

Requirements for Legitimation:

  1. Joint Affidavit of Legitimation signed by both parents.
  2. Certified True Copy of Marriage Contract
  3. Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate
  4. Admission of Paternity/Acknowledgment of Father
  5. Certificate of No Marriage (CENOMAR) from NSO.

Other requirements will be on a case-to-case basis.  Allow two to four working days as processing time; you will be given a claim stub for your filed request.

Registration Fees:

  1. Annulment of marriage – PHP 500.00
  2. Correction of entry or change of name – PHP 400.00
  3. Per registration of supplementary reports or documents as additional data – PHP 100.00
  4. Legalization of Aliens – PHP 500.00
  5. Local Adoption – PHP 1,000.00
  6. Legitimation – PHP 400.00
  7. Foundling – PHP 500.00
  8. Naturalization – PHP 1,000.00
  9. Foreign Adoption – PHP 1,000.00
  10. Repatriation – PHP 1,000.00
  11. Presumptive Death – PHP 1,000.00
  12. Per registration of other documents – PHP 300.00

Source: http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-services/requirements-a-procedures/261-civilregguide

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30

A most common issue encountered by Filipinos with their birth certificates are misspelled first, middle, or last names.  These can go from just a single misplaced letter to an entire unknown name that somehow made it to the person’s birth certificate by mistake.  If you need to have your name corrected or changed, you may do so at the city or municipality where your birth was registered.

Here is the list of requirements and fees when filing for an affidavit for clerical error and change of first name at the Quezon City Hall.  This is also otherwise known as Republic Act 9048.

Requirements for Clerical or Typographical Error:

  1. Certified true machine copy of the Certificate sought to be corrected.  Make three copies.
  2. Documents showing the correct entry/entries upon which the correction shall be based such as Baptismal Certificate, Voter’s ID, School Records, GSIS records, SSS records, medical records, business records.
  3. Other relevant documents as the Registrar may require.
  4. Filing Fee: PHP1,000 and additional service fee for Migrant Petitioner of PHP500.00.

Requirements for Change of First Name/Nickname:

  1. Certified true machine copy of the Certificate sought to be corrected.  Make three copies.
  2. Clearance from the following authorities (these are MANDATORY):
    • Clearance from Employer or Certification that the applicant has no pending case with the company (if employed).
    • Affidavit of No Employment (if the applicant is not employed).
    • NBI or PNP Clearance
    • Documents showing the correct entry/entries upon which the correction shall be based, such as: Baptismal Certificate, Voter’s ID, School records, GSIS records, SSS records, medical records, business records.
    • Other relevant documents as the Registrar may require.
  3. Filing fee: PHP3,000.00 and additional service fee for Migrant Petitioner of PHP1,000.00.

Applicants must proceed to the Civil Registry Department for further instructions.

Source:

http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-services/requirements-a-procedures/261-civilregguide

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