Category: Everything About Passports


Jan 31

Securing a passport appointment online with the DFA has become a laborious task for Filipinos as of late.  It has become close to impossible to snag a date and time to visit your preferred DFA branch for your passport application or renewal to be processed.  Pinoys, especially those who travel frequently for work and business, could not help but vent their frustration (and desperation!) through social media, blogs, and random television and radio interviews.  And why not, when one’s right to travel abroad is practically hindered simply because the Department of Foreign Affairs could not accommodate the volume of applicants.

This practice, however, of airing grievances in public opens doors to more problems than solutions.  While the DFA heeded the public’s clamor to open more appointment schedules (and soon!), scalawags also found an opportunity to earn fast, dishonest cash out of the public’s desperation to get their travel documents.  It wasn’t long before social media channels became tools for fixers to start working their charm to unassuming Filipinos who could not wait to get an appointment with the DFA online.

Of course, the DFA was quick to respond to the alarming number of scams happening right under its nose.  Through the help of investigators, they were able to uncover four types of scams that fixers employ to pick on passport applicants.

To spread awareness and warn the public from falling into the traps of these heartless crooks, we lifted some important information about passport appointment scammers and fixers and are sharing it in our page.  We still believe that awareness and vigilance will help us get ahead of these criminals and save us the trouble of wasted time, money, and effort.

Types of Passport Fixers

  1. Fixers who offer slots for a fee but do not actually get the promised appointments.

Applicants will be asked to pay a certain amount that supposedly buys them an appointment slot with the DFA.  They are given application forms to fill out, complete with barcodes and other appointment details.  Everything looks authentic except that the entire process is a hoax.  Come appointment date, the poor applicant is informed by the DFA that he or she does not have an appointment and the documents given to her by the fixer are fake.

  1. Fixers who sell courtesy lane passes.

The DFA accommodates Senior Citizens, PWDs, pregnant women, children 7 years old and below, Solo Parent ID holders, and migrant workers in its Priority Lanes.  These applicants no longer need to set an appointment online and can simply visit any DFA office anytime for their passport application.

Crooks sell this privilege to people who cannot get an appointment online.

Of course, the trade is illegal and the privilege is non-existent.

  1. Obtaining endorsements from government agencies.

This is more commonly known as an inside job where the fixer (who stays outside the DFA offices) are in cahoots with a government employee who supposedly has access to the appointments.  They sell these endorsements to passport applicants – endorsements could be genuine, but the fact that it is being sold makes it illegal.

  1. A fixer fills out an online application form using the personal information of their clients.

No one should apply on your behalf, not even fill out your online application form.  If anyone offers to do this for you for a fee, know that you are already being scammed.

Ultimately, the idea is to make the applicant believe that he or she has been given a confirmed appointment with the DFA, minus the hassle of waiting for dates and times to be freed up online, in exchange for a few thousands of pesos.  The DFA does not sell these appointment slots and so anyone who does is automatically considered a fixer.  And any transaction made with these crooks will not be honored by the DFA, no matter how much money you spent to get the appointment confirmed.

As the famous saying goes, walang manloloko kung walang magpapa loko. 

Don’t be any of the two.

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Jan 30

The Philippine Passport’s strength ranks 72nd in the world as more foreign countries open their doors to Pinoys without the need for a visa.  Last year, we were 75th among 199 passports, so there is definitely some reason to celebrate the three notches we climbed this year.

Have you been granted a 10-year validity in your passport?  Well, then it’s time to whip out that to-visit countries checklist and see if your dream destinations may now be visited without a visa!

We are not just simply sharing the list of countries, mind you.  We included a bit of information on the best places to visit in the Asian countries, just to tickle your fancy some more.

Asia:

  1. Brunei

Visit the largest museum in Brunei where you can see the Islamic Art Gallery – a magnificent collection of Islamic art belonging to the sultan Hassanal Bolkiah.

  1. Cambodia

The Angkor Wat temple.  End of story.

  1. Hong Kong

Hong Kong Disneyland and endless night markets for the insatiable shopper in all of us!

  1. Indonesia

Fine combination of sandy beaches and rolling surf, while basking in the ancient culture known for its warm hospitality.

  1. Kyrgyzstan

Stand on top of the world by climbing the Lenin Peak – a 7,134-meter peak in the country, summited by amateur and professional climbers.

  1. Laos

Explore historical war-shelter cave complexes in Vieng Xai and marvel in its beautiful gardens.

  1. Macao

From Hong Kong, you can book for a day trip to Macau or stay overnight so you can enjoy its extravagant casinos and bustling nightlife.

  1. Malaysia

Visit the Petronas Towers and pay homage to the country’s Hindu temples.

  1. Maldives

If you’re the type who can never be without sand between your toes, head on to Maldives and check in one of their famous water bungalows.

  1. Mongolia

See the world’s largest statue of Genghis Khan!

  1. Myanmar

Go to Shwedagon Paya and visit the 325ft zedi, one of Buddhism’s most sacred sites.  It is adorned with 27 metric tons of gold leaf, wlong with thousands of diamonds and other gems! Truly spectacular!

  1. Nepal

Visit the breath-taking landscapes of the Garden of Dreams in Kathmandu.

  1. Singapore

If you’re traveling with the kids, do not fail to take them to the Universal Studios for some kiddie fun!

  1. Sri Lanka

Do you love elephants and want to see them up close?  Go to the Uda Walawe National Park while you’re in Sri Lanka!

  1. Thailand

Whatever you do, do not miss the Chatuchak Weekend Market for the cheapest deals on clothes, shoes, and bags!

  1. Timor-Leste

On your way down to the beach, do not miss the rock art caves and cliffs that depict ancient practices such as people hunting!

  1. Vietnam

Visit the ruins left by the war in Ho Chi Minh City.

Africa

  1. Cape Verde
  2. Comores Island
  3. Cote d’Ivoir
  4. Djibouti
  5. Gambia
  6. Guinea-Bissau
  7. Kenya
  8. Madagascar
  9. Malawi
  10. Mauritania
  11. Mauritius
  12. Morocco
  13. Mozambique
  14. Rwanda
  15. Seychelles
  16. Somalia
  17. St. Helena
  18. Tanzania
  19. Togo
  20. 20. Uganda

Oceanic

  1. Cook Islands
  2. Fiji
  3. Marshall Islands
  4. Micronesia
  5. Niue
  6. Palau Islands
  7. Papua New Guinea
  8. Samoa
  9. Tuvalu
  10. Vanuatu

Carribean

  1. Dominica
  2. Haiti
  3. St. Lucia
  4. St. Vincent and the Grenadines
  5. Trinidad and Tobago

Americas

  1. Bolivia
  2. Brazil
  3. Colombia
  4. Costa Rica
  5. Ecuador
  6. Nicaragua
  7. Peru
  8. Suriname

Middle East

  1. Armenia
  2. Iran
  3. Israel

Gustave Flaubert said this about traveling: Travel makes one modest, you see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.

Yes, there is a whole wide world out there waiting to be explored.  And you do not always need a visa to see the rest of our gorgeous planet.  Start off with these countries that welcome Pinoys without too much fuss (i.e. waiting in line at embassies, tons of documents to be submitted) and then tell us about your unique experiences in these visa-free countries.

Safe travels!

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Jan 25

The quickest answer to this question is yes.  In fact, it is highly advisable to have your passport renewed before it expires as most countries require that your passport be valid for at least six months beyond the date of your departure.

Here are a few more pointers that frequent travelers need to know about passport renewals:

  1. Frequent travelers must not wait until their passports are nearing expiration before they have it renewed.  If your work or business requires you to travel often, you must renew your passport once you have used up half of its pages.
  2. In urgent cases when you need to travel but only have less than six months validity on your passport, the Consulate may extend its validity under the following circumstances:
    • If your passport expired within the last calendar year;
    • If your current passport is not an e-passport (it does not have the symbol for a microchip on its front cover);
    • You have already applied for the renewal of your passport and are just waiting for its release;
    • The reason for your travel is an emergency such as the death of a relative or sudden illness of a family member.  Such cases must be supported by documentary proof (doctor’s certification, emails, and other correspondences).
  3. If your passport expires while you are abroad, you may apply for a temporary travel document to allow you to travel back to the Philippines and have your passport renewed.  You may get this at the Philippine Embassy in the country where you are located.
  4. Newly married women have the option to change their last name upon renewal of their passports; however, this is not mandatory.  A married woman may keep her maiden last name in her passport if she so wishes. Should she decide to change her last name to her husband’s, she will have to retain this name until her husband passes away or when her marriage is legally dissolved (as in an annulment recognized by Philippine laws).
  5. Filipinos who are naturalized as US citizens lose their privilege to renew their Philippine passports.  If their passports are still valid at the time of their oath-taking in US soil, these are automatically invalidated.  They may apply for a Philippine passport upon reacquisition of their Filipino citizenship.

 

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Jan 24 (1)

A basic requirement for passport renewal is the submission of the expired (or expiring passport) so the DFA can cancel its validity.  But what if the old passport has gone missing?

Here’s how you can renew a lost and expired passport:

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

  • Personal appearance.
  • Confirmed appointment.
  • No need to submit a passport size photo.
  • Submit same documents required for first-time passport applicants.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS in case the passport was lost and cannot be found:

  • Submit a Notarized Affidavit of Loss (with detailed explanation on when, where, and how the passport got lost).
  • If the lost passport is still valid, submit a Police Report.
  • If available, bring a photocopy of the first page of the lost passport.

Take note that there will be a 15-day clearing period prior to the processing of an application for replacement of a lost valid passport.

IN CASE PASSPORT WAS ALREADY DECLARED LOST BY THE APPLICANT BUT EVENTUALLY WAS FOUND AND RETURNED TO THE APPLICANT:

  • Submit a Notarized Affidavit of Retrieval (with detailed explanation on when, where, and how passport was found).
  • Original and photocopy of the first and last page of the passport.

IN CASE OF MUTILATED OR DAMAGED PASSPORTS:

  • Submit a Notarized Affidavit of Mutilation (with a detailed explanation of when, where, and how the passport got mutilated or damaged).
  • Original and photocopy of the first and last page of mutilated or damaged passport.

IN CASE APPLICANT WAS ISSUED A TRAVEL DOCUMENT:

  • Original Travel Document
  • Submit a Notarized Affidavit of Explanation Regarding Issuance of Travel Document (with a detailed explanation of when, where, and why the applicant was issued a travel document).
  • Original and photocopy of the first and last page of canceled passport (if the passport is still in the possession of the applicant).

It is not advisable to pose as a first-time passport applicant if you lost your passport.  The DFA will see your previous passport details anyway and you will be required to submit the same documents (affidavit of loss, etc.) as listed above.  Your appointment will be wasted and you may run the risk of being placed under questionable applications.

Source:

www.dfa.gov.ph

www.officialgazette.gov.ph

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Jan 22 (1)

Now that you have finally set an appointment for your passport application, it is time to begin preparing the requirements you need to bring.  Here’s a summary of all the things you need to know when applying for a Philippine Passport at any DFA office:

  1. Personal appearance is required for all applicants.
  2. A confirmed appointment is required for all applicants except senior citizens, infants, and minors below 1-year-old and OFWs. For OFWs, sufficient proof must be submitted such as a valid employment contract or OEC.
  3. Earrings and contact lenses are not allowed during data capture. Smiling with visible teeth is also not allowed.
  4. Check all the data in the computer monitor and in the Enrolment Certificate before signing it.
  5. Only immediate family members are allowed to get the passport on behalf of the applicant. Immediate family members include father, mother, brother, sister, spouse, and children of legal age.
  6. The passport shall be released to an immediate family member only with the proper authorization letter. Passport of a minor applicant shall be released to parents only or to an authorized representative with Special Power of Attorney and Affidavit of Support and Consent.
  7. Passports unclaimed after six months will be canceled per Department Order No. 37-03.
  8. Check all data in the received e-passport upon release.
  9. The number of processing days may vary depending on the location of the Regional Consular Office where the application was filed.
  10. The Department may require additional supporting documents as may be necessary, especially for applicants with dual citizenship and with foreign-sounding family names to prove citizenship.

PASSPORT FEES:

For First-time Passport Applicants:

  • Regular processing (15 working days): P950.00
  • Express Processing (7 working days): P1,200.00

For Renewal of Passport:

  • Regular processing (15 working days): P950.00
  • Express Processing (7 working days): P1,200.00

For Replacement of a lost expired passport:

  • Regular processing (15 working days): P950.00
  • Express Processing (7 working days): P1,200.00

For replacement of lost valid passport:

  • Regular processing (15 working days): P950.00
  • Express Processing (7 working days): P1,200.00
  • Please take note that there is an additional fee of P200 for a lost valid MRRP/MRP or P350 for a lost valid e-passport.

Source: www.dfa.gov.ph

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Jan 18

Back in the day, passport applicants are required to bring copies of their 2×2 ID photos when applying for their Philippine passports.  Restrictions are limited to the type of shirt you should be wearing on the photo (with collar) and the background should be white.  Applicants are also advised to avoid wearing accessories such as eyeglasses and earrings that may cause huge differences from their actual physical appearance.

Now, all you need to do is personally appear at your preferred DFA branch on the date of your appointment.  All your biometrics: photos, fingerprints, and signatures will be taken onsite and in the presence of a DFA representative.

Here are some tips on how to prepare for your passport photo-op and other biometric requirements:

  1. Your Pose.

The interviews and document evaluation will be done while you sit across a DFA representative in a booth.  Right beside you is a DLSR camera, aimed at your face.  When advised by the representative, look directly at the camera lens.  Your “selfie angle” may not meet the DFA’s photo requirements so avoid tilting your head in any direction.  Your mouth and the bridge of your nose should form an imaginary vertical line at the center of the image.

  1. Your Expression.

Avoid smiling too much or frowning too much; do not raise your eyebrows nor squint your eyes or any other facial expression that may alter your natural look.  Your expression should be neutral, both eyes open and mouth closed.  Your forehead must be clearly seen without hair covering any part of your eyes or cheeks.

  1. Smiling.

You may smile but careful you do not show your teeth and gums!

  1. Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses

Remove your eyeglasses before you pose for your passport photo.  If you use contact lenses for medical reasons, you may leave it on provided these are not colored contacts.  Otherwise, you may be advised by the representative to remove the contacts before they take your photo.

  1. Ears.

Both ears should be visible.  Tuck your hair behind your ears if you have to.

  1. Earrings and Hair Accessories

Remove hair accessories before posing for your photo.  If you keep an unconventional hairstyle (afro, frizzy, out-of-bed-look), please make sure it is neatly kept for your passport appointment.

Any type of earring is not allowed.

  1. Infants and small children.

Babies and toddlers who are still unable to support themselves should be assisted by a parent or guardian.  They can hold the child but their hands and arms should not be visible in the photo.  If you need a high chair for your baby, you may request from a DFA staff while waiting for your turn to give them time to look for one.

The DFA enforces strict rules on dress codes, whether you are applying for a passport or claiming one.  When I visited the DFA in SM Manila two years ago, there was a young lady who wanted to claim her passport but was denied entry because she was wearing a mini-skirt.  She had to find a scarf that was large enough to cover her legs until below the knee before the guards allowed her to come in.

If you have questions about passport application, send us a message and we will do our best to find the best answers for you.

Reference: www.dfa.gov.ph

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Jan 11

Good news for all Solo Parent ID holders!

The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) confirmed that solo parents, with a valid Solo Parent ID, will now be prioritized at the passport application lanes.  If you are a Solo Parent ID holder, you no longer need to set an appointment online to apply for or renew your Philippine Passport.  You can simply visit any DFA branch as a walk-in applicant; as long as you have the complete set of IDs and other requirements, you will be attended to right away.

In the past, only OFWs, Senior Citizens, PWDs, pregnant women, and minors are welcome to take advantage of the priority lanes set by the DFA.  The list has become delightfully longer with Solo Parents included in it.

How do I get a Solo Parent ID?

Unlike your Postal or Philhealth ID, the Solo Parent ID may only be granted to qualified applicants.  This means that not all solo parents can qualify for the ID and its accompanying benefits and privileges.  One has to qualify based on the standards set by law.

According to RA 8972, a solo parent is:

  1. Left solo or alone with the responsibility of parenthood due to the following circumstances:
    • Death of spouse.
    • Spouse is detained or is serving sentence for a criminal conviction for at least one (1) year.
    • Physical and/or mental incapacity of spouse as certified by a public medical practitioner.
    • Legal separation or de facto separation from spouse for at least one (1) year, as long as he/she is entrusted with the custody of the children.
    • Declaration of nullity or annulment of marriage as decreed by a court or by a church as long as he/she is entrusted with the custody of the children.
  2. Unmarried mother/father who has preferred to keep and rear her/his child/children.
  3. A woman who gives birth as a result of rape and other crimes against chastity even without a final conviction of the offender, provided the mother keeps and raises the child.
  4. Any other person who solely provides parental care and support to a child or children.
  5. Any family member who assumes the responsibility of head of family as a result of the death, abandonment, disappearance or prolonged absence of the parents or solo parent.

If you wish to apply for a Solo Parent ID, you may proceed to your designated barangay hall or directly to a DSWD office in your area.  Your financial status is part of the evaluation, so make sure to bring a copy of your ITR; if you are a stay-at-home parent, the DSWD worker should be able to identify what document you can file in place of an ITR.

Prepare a copy of the PSA birth certificates of your children as well as any other document that could attest to your status as a solo parent (annulment papers, spouse’s death certificate, etc.).

Your documents will be evaluated by a social worker; it could take up to 30 days for your ID to be issued.  The Solo Parent ID is valid for one year and is renewable.

Reference: www.dfa.gov.ph

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Jan 09 (1)

In almost all of your transactions, whether with a government agency or a private corporation like banks, schools, and remittance centers, you will always be required to present a government-issued ID.  It doesn’t matter if you have a company ID, a school ID, or membership cards, agencies will always require you to present a government-issued ID.

When applying for a passport, you will be required to present at least one of the following:

  • Digitized SSS ID
  • Driver’s License
  • GSIS E-Card
  • PRC ID
  • IBP ID
  • OWWA ID
  • Digitized BIR ID
  • Senior Citizen’s ID
  • Voter’s ID
  • Seaman’s Book

Today’s article will focus on the different types of government-issued IDs and certificates and how you can apply for each.  We hope this helps you complete your collection of government-issued IDs.

Cedula

A Community Tax Certificate (CTC), also known as Cedula, is issued to every individual or corporation upon payment of the community tax.  Every Filipino who is at least 18 years old and has been regularly employed for at least 30 consecutive working days must have his own cedula.  Business owners, real property owners, and all others who may be required by law must also apply for a cedula.

How to get a Cedula:

  1. Go to your local government office (barangay, municipal, or city hall) where CTCs are issued.
  2. Fill out the application slip, submit, and pay the required amount.  The fee will depend on how much salary you are going to declare on the application slip.  Wait for the issuing officer to give you your CTC.
  3. Sign and affix your thumbprint on the spaces provided on the CTC.
  4. The Cedula is valid until the last day of the year when it was acquired.

Barangay Clearance

The Barangay Clearance is a prerequisite for a Postal ID or a Mayor’s Permit; it is something that both private employees and business people need to have.  It is also a basic requirement when applying for affidavits and other legal transactions.  Basically, it attests to your good standing as a resident or business owner in a specific barangay.

How to get a Barangay Clearance:

  1. Proceed to your designated Barangay Hall and inform the officer on duty that you would like to apply for a Barangay Clearance. Fill out the application form and pay the necessary fees (fees vary per barangay).
  2. Present your cedula; if you do not have one yet, you may also secure this from the barangay hall.
  3. Wait for your clearance to be released (if no negative records are found under your name).

Postal ID

Phlpost has upgraded the physical appearance of the postal ID.  You need to get one as an additional government-issued ID.  Here are the requirements and procedures:

  1. Proceed to the Post Office in your area and submit two copies of duly accomplished PID application form.
  2. Submit your PSA birth certificate or GSIS or UMID Card, or Driver’s License, or valid Passport.
  3. If you are a married female applicant, bring a copy of your PSA Marriage Certificate to validate change of name from birth documents.
  4. Pay the fixed fee of Php 504.00.
  5. You will be instructed to proceed to the nearest ID capture station for your photo and fingerprints.  There are 260 ID capture stations nationwide.
  6. Expect to receive your ID after approximately 15 working days if your delivery address is in Metro Manila, 20 working days if you live in other major cities and municipalities, and 30 working days if you live in island provinces and remote barangays.

NBI Clearance

You may now apply for an NBI clearance online!  Here’s how:

  1. Register and create your account online at nbi-clearance.com.  There will be a guided process, just follow this.
  2. Make sure to have a working and accessible email address; use this when registering at the NBI website and wait for the confirmation email to be sent to you. You need to confirm your registration through the email in order for your account to activate.
  3. Login to your NBI account using the username and password you registered. Fill out the online application form and submit.
  4. Schedule an appointment at your preferred NBI Clearance Outlet.  Select the date when you wish to process your NBI clearance.
  5. Fee for NBI Clearance is P115 but e-payment services charge an additional P25, so your NBI Clearance fee total will be P140.  You may pay online, or over the counter at accredited banks, through GCash, or at any Bayad Center.  Note that until you have made a payment, your appointment is not confirmed.
  6. Print your NBI clearance application form and wait for the date of your appointment.  Bring your printed form when you visit the NBI outlet.

Unified Multi-purpose ID

Considered as the “Mother” of all IDs because it can cover your SSS, GSIS, PagIBIG, and PhilHealth transactions through a contact less smartchip technology.  It stores the member’s SSS information and biometrics data such as fingerprints, facial image, and signature.

  1. Visit the nearest SSS branch that has UMID enrollment/ID capture facility.  Fill out the UMID Card application form.
  2. Bring one of the primary valid IDs (passport, driver’s license, Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) Card, Seaman’s Book).  If you do not have any of these, bring two of your secondary identification cards/documents.
  3. Proceed to the ID capture booth, fingerprint scanning, and electronic signature process.
  4. Wait for your UMID to be delivered to your address.

BIR TIN ID

This is required before you even begin working; all legitimate companies will require your Tax Identification Number (TIN) to ensure that your taxes are remitted to the government properly.

  1. Proceed to the nearest BIR branch in your area.  Note that it would be best that you apply at the BIR in the same city or municipality where you are working.
  2. Bring a copy of your PSA birth certificate and 1×1 photo of yourself.
  3. The BIR TIN ID has a lifetime validity and is free of charge.  Some RDOs may be able to give you your ID on the same day while others may require you to come back after a day.

PRC ID (Professional Regulations Commission)

This is exclusive to individuals who took and passed professional licensure examinations such as Certified Public Accountants, Architects, Engineers, Lawyers, Physicians, Dentists, etc.

  1. Accomplish the Action Sheet – this may be downloaded from the PRC website.
  2. Pay for the metered documentary stamps at the CSC (Customer Service Counter).  Please make sure that your photo and photocopies of documents have metered documentary stamps.
  3. Pay the prescribed fees at the Cashier (Php 450).
  4. Present duly accomplished AS together with documents and receive your claim slip at Window 16, Window 18, and Window 30.
  5. Claim your documents as scheduled.  Please refer to your claim slip for further instructions.

Your PRC ID is valid for three years and can be renewed thereafter.

If you are thinking about applying for a Philippine passport, it may be best that you work on getting at least three government-issued IDs first.

For questions about the different IDs and clearances we featured, send us a message and we will do our best to find the best answers for you.

Reference: http://www.gov.ph

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Jan 05 (1)

Applicants who are below 18 years old have a different set of general requirements and other documents depending on the child’s status (illegitimate, traveling without either parent, etc.).  The parents’ passports are vital requirements and must be included in the documents and IDs to be submitted when applying at a DFA office.  In cases where the child is illegitimate, the mother must be present throughout the whole passport application process.

General Requirements:

  • Confirmed appointment (except for 1-year-old and below).
  • Personal appearance of the minor applicant.
  • Personal appearance of either parent and valid passport of parents (if minor is a LEGITIMATE child).
  • Personal appearance of mother and proper ID or valid passport of mother (if minor is an ILLEGITIMATE child).
  • Original Birth Certificate of minor in Security Paper issued by the PSA (you may order at www.psahelpline.ph) or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar and duly authenticated by PSA.
    • Transcribed Birth Certificate from the LCR is required when entries in PSA Birth Certificate are blurred or unreadable.  Report of Birth duly authenticated by PSA is required if minor was born abroad.
  • Document of identity with photo, if minor is 8-17 years old (for first time and renewal applicant) such as School ID or Form 137 with readable dry seal.
  • For minor applicants who never attended school, a Notarized Affidavit of Explanation executed by either parent (if minor is a legitimate child) / by mother (if minor is an illegitimate child) detailing the reasons why the child is not in school, is required.
  • Marriage Certificate of minor’s parents duly authenticated by PSA (for legitimate child).
  • Original and photocopy of valid passport of the person traveling with the minor.

Additional Requirements:

IF MINOR IS NOT TRAVELING WITH EITHER PARENT OR ALONE:

  • Personal appearance of either parent (if minor is a legitimate child) / of mother (if minor is an illegitimate child).
  • Affidavit of Support and Consent (ASC) executed by either parent indicating the name of the traveling companion and relationship to the minor.  If minor will be traveling alone, ASC must be executed by either parent, stating that his/her child will be traveling alone.  If minor is illegitimate, mother should execute the ASC.
  • Original and photocopy of DSWD Clearance.
  • There is no need to secure a DSWD Clearance if the minor traveling abroad has parents who are in the Foreign Service or living abroad or are immigrants, provided he/she is holding a valid pass such as a dependent’s visa / pass / identification card or permanent resident visa / pass / identification card which serves as proof that he / she is living with parents abroad.

IF BOTH PARENTS ARE ABROAD:

  • Affidavit of Support and Consent (ASC) executed by either parent indicating the name of the traveling companion (authenticated by the nearest Philippine Embassy or Consulate General). If minor is illegitimate, mother should execute the ASC.
  • Special Power of Attorney (SPA) with an attached photocopy of either parent’s valid passport (authenticated by the nearest Philippine Embassy or Consulate General) authorizing a representative in assisting the child to apply for a passport.  If minor is illegitimate, mother should execute the SPA.
  • Original and photocopy of DSWD Clearance.
  • There is no need to secure a DSWD clearance if the minor traveling abroad has parents who are in the Foreign Service or living abroad or are immigrants, provided he / she is holding a valid pass such as a dependent’s visa / pass / identification card or permanent resident visa / pass / identification card which serves as proof that he / she is living with parents abroad.
  • Proper ID of the duly authorized representative (refer to the list of IDs here – hyperlink to latest article on acceptable IDs and documents).

IF MINOR IS LEGITIMATED BY SUBSEQUENT MARRIAGE OF PARENTS:

  • Authenticated Birth Certificate from PSA must include annotation regarding new status as legitimated and the full name of the child.

IF MINOR IS ILLEGITIMATE BUT ACKNOWLEDGED BY FATHER:

  • Birth Certificate from PSA reflecting surname of father with Affidavit of Acknowledgment and Consent to use the surname of the father.

IF MINOR IS A FOUNDLING:

  • Certificate of foundling authenticated by PSA.
  • DSWD Clearance.
  • Passport of the person who found the applicant.
  • Letter of authority or endorsement from DSWD for the issuance of passport.

IF MINOR IS ORPHANED:

  • Authenticated Death Certificates of parents from PSA.
  • Court order awarding guardianship of the orphaned minor applicant or substitute parental authority under Article 214 and 216 of the Family Code.
  • DSWD Clearance

ABANDONED MINOR APPLICANT:

  • Court order awarding guardianship of the abandoned minor applicant or substitute parental authority.
  • DSWD Travel Clearance.

IF MINOR IS LEGALLY ADOPTED:

  • Original and Certified True Copy (CTC) of PSA Birth Certificate before adoption.
  • Original and Certified True Copy (CTC) of the PSA amended Birth Certificate after adoption.
  • Certified True Copy (CTC) of the Court Decision or Order on Adoption and Certificate of Finality.
  • DSWD clearance for minor applicant, if traveling with the person other than the adopting parents.

In case the applicant is for adoption by foreign parents:

  • Certified True Copy of the Court Decree of Abandonment of Child.
  • PSA Death Certificate of the child’s parents or the Deed of Voluntary Commitment executed after the birth of the child.
  • Endorsement of child to the Inter-country Adoption Board by the DSWD.
  • Authenticated Birth or Foundling Certificate.

MINOR APPLICANT WHOSE PARENTS ARE ANNULLED / DIVORCED:

  • Court order awarding guardianship of the minor applicant or substitute parental authority.
  • DSWD Travel Clearance.
  • PSA Marriage Certificate with annotation on nullity or annulment decree.

MINOR APPLICANT WHOSE MOTHER IS LIKEWISE A MINOR:

  • Personal appearance of mother and maternal grandparent/s.
  • PSA Birth Certificate of minor applicant and mother.
  • Affidavit of Support and Consent executed by the maternal grandparent/s indicating the name of the traveling companion.
  • DSWD Clearance if minor will be traveling with the person other than the maternal grandparent/s.
  • Proof of identity of mother and maternal grandparent/s (please refer to list of acceptable IDs).

The DFA implements strict measures for minor passport applicants to ensure the safety and security of Filipino children traveling abroad.  Parents are likewise encouraged to cooperate and provide all the needed documents to avoid delays in their child’s application.

Reference: www.dfa.gov.ph

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Jan 04 (1)

Your PSA birth certificate is a primary requirement when applying for a passport with the DFA.  Without it, it would be nearly impossible to get the rest of the application process done.

Unfortunately, there are some people who really do not have their civil registry documents on file at the PSA.  When they request for a copy, they receive a Negative Certification, indicating that they do not have any records or theirs may have gotten lost during or after the war.

How do you apply for a passport if you do not have a birth certificate?

Let us show you how:

If you were born in or after January 1, 1950, you need to submit the following:

General Requirements:

  1. Personal appearance at your chosen DFA branch.
  2. Confirmed appointment (done online at www.passport.gov.ph/appointment)
  3. Accomplished application form.
  4. Valid picture ID with photocopy.
  5. Supporting Documents

In case of NO BIRTH CERTIFICATE:

  1. Apply for the delayed registration of birth at the local civil registry office at the applicant’s place of birth.
  2. Submit the following documents:
    • Authenticated Negative Result of Birth Certificate from the PSA.
    • Supporting public documents with the correct date and place of birth such as:
      • Form 137
      • Voter’s registration record
      • Baptismal certificate with readable dry seal.
      • National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) certificate with photo and readable dry seal (for Muslim applicants).

If you were born in or before December 31, 1949:

General Requirements:

  1. Personal appearance at your chosen DFA branch
  2. Confirmed appointment (done online at www.passport.gov.ph/appointment)
  3. Accomplished application form
  4. Valid picture ID with photocopy
  5. Supporting documents

In case of NO BIRTH CERTIFICATE:

  1. Certificate of Non-availability of Record from the Philippine Statistics Authority.
  2. Notarized Joint Birth Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons
  3. Any public document with the correct full name, and date and place of birth such as:
    • Baptismal Certificate with readable dry seal
    • National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) Certificate with photo and readable dry seal (for Muslim applicants).

If you are unable to secure a copy of your birth certificate from the PSA, proceed right away to the LCR of the city or municipality where you were born.  There are a multitude of reasons why your birth records may not be available at the PSA, you just need to find out why so you would know what to do next.  The LCR would be able to tell you what you need to do in order to have your birth records documented, or corrected, or reconstructed, whatever the case may be.

If you have questions about birth certificates, send us a message and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

References:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.dfa.gov.ph

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