Category: Everything About Passports


07 - 03

Whether you are applying for a passport for the first time or are about to have your old one renewed, you need to be guided by the following reminders from the DFA.  A lot of applicants fail to check these fine prints in the DFA website and end up losing their slot simply because they are not wearing the prescribed dress code, lack the necessary documents, and sometimes, does not have the exact amount for the passport fees!

To help you achieve a hassle-free visit to the DFA we summarized the following guidelines when applying for a passport.  You may also download the complete list of the DFA’s required IDs and supporting documents here.

IMPORTANT REMINDERS TO ALL PASSPORT APPLICANTS:

  • Personal appearance is required for all applicants.
  • Confirmed appointment is required for all applicants EXCEPT:
    • Senior citizens
    • Infants and minors below 1 year old
    • OFWs – OFWs must show sufficient proof such as valid employment contract or OEC.
  • Earrings and colored contact lenses are not allowed during data capturing. Smiling with visible teeth is also not allowed.
  • Check all the data in the computer monitor and in the Enrolment Certificate before signing it.
  • Only immediate family members are allowed to get the passport on behalf of the applicant. Immediate family members include father, mother, brother, sister, spouse, and children of legal age.
  • Passport shall be released to an immediate family member only with proper authorization letter. Passport of a minor applicant shall be released to parents only or to an authorized representative with Special Power of Attorney and Affidavit of Support and Consent.
  • Passports unclaimed after six (6) months will be cancelled per Department Order No. 37-03.
  • Check all data in the received e-passport upon release.
  • Number of processing days may vary depending on the location of the Regional Consular Office where the application was filed.
  • The Department may require additional supporting documents as may be necessary, especially for applicants with dual citizenship and with foreign-sounding family names to prove citizenship.

PASSPORT FEES:

For FIRST TIME passport applicants:

  • Regular Processing (15 working days) – Php 950.00
  • Express Processing (7 working days) – Php 1,200.00

For RENEWAL of passport:

  • Regular Processing (15 working days) – Php 950.00
  • Express Processing (7 working days) – Php 1,200.00

For REPLACEMENT of a LOST EXPIRED passport:

  • Regular Processing (15 working days)– Php 950.00
  • Express Processing (7 working days) — Php 1,200.00

For REPLACEMENT of a LOST VALID passport:

  • Regular Processing (15 working days) – Php 950.00
  • Express Processing (7 working days) – Php 1,200

GUIDELINES WHEN HAVING YOUR PHOTO CAPTURED:

  1. Your Pose

Your frontal pose looking directly at the camera lens and showing your full face must be used.  Rotation or tilting of the head either in an up/down or left/right direction must be avoided.  The mid points of the mouth and the bridge of the nose should lie on an imaginary vertical line in the center of the image.

  1. Expression

Your expression should be neutral with both eyes open and mouth closed.  There should be no hair covering the eyes.  Contrived expressions such as raised eyebrows, squinting, or frowning are not acceptable.

  1. Smiling

When having photos captured, applicant may smile but without showing their teeth and gums.  The ‘Mona Lisa’ smile is recommended.

  1. Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses

Eyeglasses should always be removed before capturing the applicant’s photo.  The use of contact lenses for medical reasons is accepted, provided that the contact lenses do not change the applicant’s true eye color.  Therefore, applicants are advised to take off their contact lenses before having their photos captured.

  1. Ears should be visible

As much as possible, both ears of the applicant should be visible.

  1. Earrings and hair accessories

These accessories should be removed prior to photo capturing.  Frizzy/afro hairstyles should be neatly arranged showing full frontal facial image.  Earrings as not allowed.

  1. Infants

Infants or very small children who are unable to support themselves should be assisted by either parent or their guardians.  Hands, arms, etc., used to support the child should not be visible.  Highchair for minor applicants may be used, if needed.

COURTESY LANE FACILITY AVAILMENT AT ASEANA: Who are allowed to use the Courtesy Lane?

  • Regular government employees / with GSIS / appointed by Civil Service Commission
  • Dependent of government employee
    • Legal spouse
    • Parents
    • Unmarried children
  • Retired government employees (one year availment)
  • Incumbent elected officials
  • For barangay level, only the following are entitled:
    • Barangay Chairman
    • Barangay Kagawad
    • SK Chairman
  • Endorse from House of Representatives must be endorsed by DLLU before lodging their applications to Courtesy Lane
  • Media personnel must first secure endorsement from Public Information Services Unit (PISU) before going to Courtesy Lane.
  • Referrals made from DFA employees (limited to 3 referrals per month) and Head/s of other government agencies must secure proper endorsements duly signed by authorized signatories of their respective offices. Only original copies will be accepted for verification purposes. Photocopy of DFA employee’s valid I.D. / government agencies official’s Department I.D. must be attached for verification purposes.
  • Minor (7 years old and below)
  • Senior Citizens (60 years old and above)
  • PWD (genuinely disabled) / with PWD I.D.s
  • Pregnant (genuinely pregnant) / with medical certificate
  • Passport fees:
    • Php 1,200.00 – 10 working days
    • Senior citizens have an optional processing fee of Php 950.00 – 20 working days

If you have questions about passport applications and renewals, send us a message and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source: www.dfa.gov.ph

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04 - 06 (1)

When a person changes his name, whether due to marriage, adoption, or corrections on birth certificate entries, the rest of his identification documents, such as passports, should also be updated.  Here is a list of name amendments allowed by Philippine laws and the specific requirements when applying for a new or renewed passport due to change in name.

  1. Change of name due to marriage.
  2. Change of surname of a legitimated child by virtue of a subsequent marriage of parents.
  3. Change of name due to adoption.
  4. Change of name due to death of spouse or annulment of marriage.
  5. Change of name due to divorce (valid only for those Filipinos who did not act as Plaintiff in the divorce proceedings, i.e. the Filipino spouse did not initiate the divorce proceedings; not valid for couples who were both Filipinos at the time of the marriage).
  6. Change of name as duly ordered by Philippine courts or the Civil Registrar General.

General Requirements

  1. Duly accomplished passport application form, typed or printed legibly in black or blue ink.
  2. Latest original passport and one photocopy of data page of passport (original will be returned).
  3. Proof that applicant has not applied for foreign citizenship, e.g. resident alien card.

Requirements for Change of Name DUE TO MARRIAGE:

  1. If marriage was solemnized in the Philippines, bring your PSA certified original copy and one photocopy or marriage certificate.  The original copy is for verification only and will be returned to the applicant. Applicant may order a copy of the PSA Marriage Certificate online at www.psahelpline.ph.  Copies will be delivered to their address.
  2. Original and one photocopy of marriage certificate The original copy is for verification only and will be returned to the applicant. Applicant may order a copy of the PSA Marriage Certificate online at www.psahelpline.ph.  Copies will be delivered to their address.
  3. If marriage was solemnized abroad, bring a duly accomplished Report of Marriage Contracted Abroad form.

Requirements for Change of Name DUE TO DEATH OF HUSBAND, DIVORCE, ANNULLED MARRIAGES:

  1. For widowed applicants, authenticated death certificate of husband, authenticated court order of presumptive death.
  2. If marriage was annulled, PSA Marriage Certificate, with annotation reflecting the annulment of marriage.  Applicant may have a copy delivered by ordering online at www.psahelpline.ph.
  3. If applicant is divorced, submit an original and one photocopy of Divorce Decree (original will be returned).
  4. Number 3 is applicable only when the applicant is the Filipino spouse; if both parties were Filipino citizens at the time of marriage, this will not apply.

Requirement for change of name DUE TO LEGITIMATION UPON SUBSEQUENT MARRIAGE OF PARENTS (or as ordered by Philippine courts or by the Civil Registrar General):

Requirement for change of name DUE TO ADOPTION:

Changes in name allowed under Republic Act 9048:

These are changes in name entries that did not have to undergo a judicial order:

  • Correction of clerical or typographical errors in any entry in civil registry documents, except corrections involving the change in sex, age, nationality, and civil status of a person.
  • Change of a person’s first name in his/her civil registry document under certain grounds specified under the law through administrative process.

Requirement:

Source:

www.gov.ph

www.dfa.gov.ph

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03 - 31 (1)

Margaret is 13 years old and is about to secure her very first passport.  It would have been a breeze to accomplish this errand if not for Margaret’s living arrangement that is quite complicated.

Margaret’s parents separated before she turned 7 years old.  Her mother went back home to her province in Dumaguete; Margaret was left with her father who was then working as a nurse in Manila.  Not long after the separation, her father met another woman who would later assume the role of Margaret’s mom.  By the time Margaret turned 9 years old, her father’s girlfriend has moved in with them and has since been taking care of Margaret like she was her own daughter.

Her father is now based in London with a successful career as a dialysis nurse.  He wants for his girlfriend and Margaret to come visit him this summer.  While Margaret is all set to begin her passport application process, her father’s girlfriend is a bit worried that she might not be able to produce the documents required by the DFA.

What are the general requirements for minors applying for a passport?

The requirements vary depending on the child’s birthright and if she is traveling on her own, with her parents, or a guardian.

General Requirements:

  1. Confirmed appointment
  2. Personal appearance of minor
  3. Personal appearance of parent
  4. PSA birth certificate
  5. School ID or Form 137 of minor applicant
  6. PSA marriage certificate of minor applicant’s parents.
  7. Affidavit of support and consent to travel (from parent).
  8. Valid passport of the person traveling with the minor.
  9. Parents’ valid passport or identification documents.

If the child is not traveling with either parent or alone:

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. DSWD clearance

If both parents are abroad:

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. Special power of attorney (with an attached photocopy of either parent’s valid passport authorizing a representative in assisting the child to apply for a passport.  If minor is illegitimate, mother should execute the SPA).

If minor is legitimated by subsequent marriage of parents.

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. PSA birth certificate of the minor and must include the annotation regarding new status as legitimated and the full name of the child.

If minor is illegitimate but acknowledged by father.

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. PSA birth certificate of the minor reflecting surname of father with Affidavit of Acknowledgment and Consent to use the surname of the father.

If minor is legally adopted

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. PSA birth certificate
    • Original and certified true copy of PSA birth certificate before adoption.
    • Original and certified true copy of PSA amended birth certificate after adoption.
  3. DSWD clearance
    • If traveling with a person other than the adopting parents.
  4. Certified True Copy of the Court Decision of Order on Adoption and Certificate of Finality must also be complied.

If minor’s parents are annulled / divorced

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. PSA marriage certificate of parents with annotation on nullity or annulment decree.
  3. DSWD clearance

If minor’s mother is likewise a minor

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. Personal appearance of mother and maternal grandparents.
  3. PSA birth certificate of minor applicant and mother.
  4. Affidavit of Support and Consent executed by the maternal grandparents indicating the name of the traveling companion.
  5. DSWD clearance if traveling with a person other than the maternal grandparents.
  6. Proof of identity of mother and maternal grandparents.

Minors 12 months and below are no longer required to seek an appointment with the DFA.

Apart from producing all the basic documentary requirements, Margaret’s father had to contact her mother and request her to accompany Margaret to the DFA.  This made Margaret’s passport application a lot easier than if she were accompanied by her father’s girlfriend.

Applying for a minor child’s passport could get complicated if you are not armed with the necessary documents beforehand.  We hope this list helps clear out the questions that most parents have regarding their children’s passport applications and renewals.

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02-24

A primary requirement when applying for a passport (or renewing an old one) is the applicant’s birth certificate in Security Paper (SECPA) issued by the Philippine Statistics Authority (formerly NSO) or a Certified True Copy issued by the Local Civil Registrar.  This has become an issue among senior citizens, especially those born on 1945 and earlier years.  Most, if not all, could not secure copies of their birth certificates as these were believed to have been destroyed during and after World War 2.

So how does a Senior Citizen acquire a passport if he could not produce a copy of his birth certificate?  The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) published a special set of requirements specifically for senior citizens born on or after 1950 and those born before 1950.  Read on!

A. First Time Passport Application and born in or after January 1, 1950

  • Personal appearance of senior citizen applicant.
  • Duly accomplished application form – may be downloaded from the DFA website.
  • Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity.
  • For birth record documents (in place of the PSA Birth Certificate):
    • Apply for the delayed registration of birth at the local civil registry office located at the place of birth of applicant.
    • Submit authenticated Birth Certificate from PSA and supporting public documents with correct date and place of birth (i.e. Form 137, Voter’s Registration Record, Baptismal Certificate with readable dry seal or National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) with photo and readable dry seal for Muslim applicants).

B. First Time Passport Application and born before 1950 (December 31, 1949 and earlier):

  • Personal appearance of senior citizen applicant.
  • Duly accomplished application form – may be downloaded from the DFA website.
  • Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity.
  • For birth record documents (in place of the PSA Birth Certificate):
    • Certificate of Non-availability of Record from the PSA.
    • Notarized Joint Birth Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons.
    • Any public document/s with correct full name, date and place of birth (i.e. Baptismal Certificate with readable dry seal or NCMF Certificate with photo and readable dry seal for Muslim applicants).

Senior Citizen passport applicants do not need to secure an appointment online.  They will be accommodated anytime at any DFA branch office.

Share this to families and friends!

Source: http://dfa.gov.ph/renewal-of-passport-requirements

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02-20

While we anticipate the approval of the proposed 10-year validity of Philippine passports, we should continue to mark our calendars as to when we should be applying for a passport renewal.  Currently, Philippine passports have a 5-year validity period and most passengers who have less than a year before their passports expire are no longer permitted to leave the country.

This is a dilemma encountered by most OFWs.

So what happens if your passport expires while you are overseas?

Read on:

1.Allow a one year renewal period.

Avoid waiting until you only have a few weeks left before your passport expires.  The process of renewing your passport from abroad takes at least 8 to 12 weeks.

2. Visit the Philippine Embassy / Consulate General in the country where you are currently located.

a. Bring your passport and other pertinent documents related to your travel or stay.

b. The Philippine Embassy will send your renewal application to the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) office in Manila.

c. Check online if the Philippine Embassy in your area requires applicants to set up an appointment.  Most Philippine Embassies accommodate walk-in applications for passport renewal.

d. All details such as photographs, fingerprints, and signatures will be taken on-site.

3. What are the documents you need to bring?

a. Duly accomplished passport application form, typed or printed legibly on black or blue ink.

b. Latest passport.

c. One (1) photocopy of each of the data page/s of the passport.

d. Photocopy of any valid identification card where the middle name is fully spelled out, such as state4 ID, driver’s license, Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate, or Baptismal Certificate.

e. Proof that applicant has not applied for foreign citizenship, e.g. resident alien card (green card).

These requirements may vary depending on the host country of the Philippine Embassy you will be applying to.

4. But how about if the passport IS already expired?

If your passport got lost or is already expired and you need to travel back to the Philippines, you have to secure a Travel Document from the Philippine Embassy in your host country.

What is a Travel Document?

  • Travel documents are issued to Philippine nationals returning to the Philippines, who for one reason or another, have lost their passport or cannot be issued a regular passport.
  • It is also issued to Filipino citizens who are being sent back to the Philippines.
  • It is valid for a non-extendable period of thirty (30) days from date of issuance and only for a one-way direct travel to the Philippines.  It cannot be used for re-entry to the host country.

The travel Document can only be issued when:

  • The consular officer determines that its use is warranted by emergency/critical circumstances.
  • It cannot be used as a short cut in complying with the requirements for the renewal of a passport or the replacement of a lost passport.

Renewing your Philippine passport abroad may be the last thing you would want to do while on a trip, whether as a tourist or an overseas worker.  You can avoid this by simply making sure that your passport is kept up-to-date.  Until the law on the 10-year validity period for Philippine Passports has been ratified, we all need to exert a little more effort in making sure that our passports are updated and are not expiring anytime soon.

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/2013-04-04-07-00-36

http://bangkokpe.dfa.gov.ph/consular-office/services/passport/travel-document

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/philippines-dc/consular-services-dc/faq-dc/

http://www.pinoyhood.com/renew-passport-abroad/

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02-14

In June 2016, we shared the news on the government’s proposal to extend Passport and Driver’s License validity from 5 years and 3 years respectively, to 10 years for both.  Fast forward to eight months from the time the news broke out, the House of Representatives have submitted their approval to extend the lifespan of Philippine passports to 10 years!

The amendment of House Bill 4767, Section 10 of the RA 8239 (Philippine Passport Act of 1996) will positively impact OFWs, seafarers, and business people who travel often.  The government aims to help Pinoys save on time, effort, and money by extending passport validity to 10 years; this has also been the public’s clamor for a while now since the U.S. Embassy now grants 10-year multiple entry visas to Filipino applicants.

The bill has been transmitted to the Senate and will undergo three readings before the final decision is handed down.  The entire country awaits the approval and enactment of this proposition.

Tell us what you think about this latest update on Passport Validity.

Source:

http://www.rappler.com/nation/161366-house-approves-bill-extending-passport-validity-10-years?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=referral

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02-13

The DFA will always refer to the authenticated copy of our PSA birth certificate for the accuracy and completeness of our names.  The name, and how it is written, on the birth certificate is what will appear on the passport.

Miguel Oben is an illegitimate child.  He has always used his mother’s last name as his surname (Oben); he leaves the middle name field blank in all of his documents and IDs.  When he applied for a passport, he was required to present a copy of his PSA birth certificate.  He was shocked to find that his name on his birth certificate is Miguel Villanueva Oben – Villanueva being his biological father’s last name!  He verified this against the copy of the LCR where his birth was registered and got the same results.  When he presented his birth certificate to the DFA, his passport application was denied.

What must be done in such cases?

Miguel was left with no choice but to have the issue on his birth certificate rectified at the Local Civil Registry where his birth was registered.  Since he is an illegitimate child and his father’s name does not appear on his birth certificate (except for his last name that somehow found its way to Miguel’s middle name field), he should continue carrying his mother’s last name while the middle name field must be left blank.

While waiting for the results from the Local Civil Registry (which could take between 6 months to a year), Miguel tried appealing his case to the DFA.  It turns out that he needs the passport to visit his mother who suffered a stroke in Guam, USA.  Luckily, he was able to support this claim with documents from his mother’s doctors.

Although it is not customary for the DFA to work around identity and documentary issues of passport applicants, there are certain cases when the application is reconsidered and additional documents are required.  Cases similar to Miguel’s may be required to present an Affidavit of One and The Same Person in support of the IDs and documents he presented bearing his name as Miguel Oben.  Apart from the said Affidavit, Miguel also attached a signed letter to the DFA stating that he shall be presenting the annotated copy of his birth certificate upon renewal of his passport.

Again, these kinds of issues are handled and evaluated by the DFA on a case-to-case basis.  The results of the evaluation are entirely up to the discretion of DFA’s experts.  At the end of the day, the public is expected to adhere to the policies of the DFA as published in their website and as posted in their offices.

Source: www.dfa.gov.ph

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02-09

After you have successfully satisfied all the ID and documentary requirements to obtain a new passport or have your old one renewed, you will be issued a receipt by the DFA cashier.  If you opted not to have your passport delivered to you, you will have to go back to that DFA branch to claim your passport.  The date of release is stamped on the receipt; you may come back on or after the date stated on your receipt – but not later than six months.

What happens if I fail to claim my passport after six months?

Based on DFA regulations, all unclaimed passports at the DFA main office, Philippine Overseas Employment Agency (POEA) Passport Extension Office, Regional Consular Offices (RCOs) nationwide will be considered inactive and will be disposed of after six months.

Do I need to apply for a new one again and pay the same fees?

Yes.  You need to secure an appointment online in order to be accommodated for your new passport application.  Apart from all the required IDs and documents, you also need to secure an Unclaimed List from the DFA Records Division.  This must be attached to your application documents and submitted to the DFA.

Pay the corresponding fee at the cashier and wait for your receipt.  Make sure that the release date is clearly stamped on the slip.

  • PHP 950.00 for regular processing (15 working days).
  • PHP 1,200 for rush processing (7 working days).
  • Additional PHP 150.00 if you opt to have the passport delivered to you.

What if I lose my receipt?

You need to draft a signed explanation letter to detail the reasons why you lost your receipt.  This must be presented at the releasing section on or after the release date.

Can I ask a relative or a friend to claim my passport on my behalf?

No, you have to personally appear at the DFA branch when claiming your passport.

Source:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph

http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/210509/news/nation/dfa-reminds-applicants-claim-passports-within-6-months

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02-08

A passport applicant was denied because her name on her birth certificate did not match any of the IDs and clearances she presented to the DFA.  Why is this so?

Janine’s parents’ marriage was annulled shortly after she turned one year old.  After the annulment, her mother immediately reverted to using her maiden last name.  Since the mother had sole custody of Janine, she decided to drop the father’s last name and had Janine use her maiden name in all of her records instead.

Now, at 34 years old, Janine applied for her passport (for the first time) and was shocked when she was told her application was denied.  According to the DFA, the name on her birth certificate and the names on the rest of her documents and IDs do not match.  And because of this, she needs to have her birth certificate amended first before her application could be entertained.

Janine was willing to just use her name as it appears on her birth certificate but they explained to her that this could not be done.  The DFA verifies a person’s identity against all of the documents and IDs required of an applicant and since her names do not match, they could not issue her a passport.

What are the requirements when applying for a passport for the first time?

  1. Personal appearance of applicant.
  2. Confirmed appointment
  3. Duly accomplished application form (may be downloaded from the DFA website).
  4. Birth Certificate in PSA Security Paper (SECPA) or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar (LCR) and duly authenticated by the PSA.
  5. Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity such as:
    • Government-issued picture IDs:
      • Digitized SSS ID
      • Driver’s License
      • GSIS E-card
      • PRC ID
      • IBP ID
      • OWWA ID
      • Digitized BIR ID
      • Senior Citizen’s ID
      • Unified Multi-purpose ID
      • Voter’s ID
      • Old College ID
      • Alumni ID
      • Old Employment IDs
    • And at least two of the following:
      • PSA Marriage Contract
      • Land Title
      • Seaman’s Book
      • Elementary or High School Form 137 or Transcript of Records with readable dry seal.
      • Government Service Record
      • NBI Clearance
      • Police Clearance
      • Barangay Clearance
      • Digitized Postal ID
      • Readable SSS-E1 Form or Microfilmed Copy of SSS E1 Form
      • Voter’s Certification, List of Voters and Voter’s Registration Record
      • School Yearbook

Janine presented her PSA Birth Certificate, her college IDs, her company ID, and her Voter’s ID.  Of the four, only her birth certificate shows her last name as that of her father’s while the rest were all her mother’s maiden last name.

She was advised to proceed to the Local Civil Registry where her birth was registered and inquire about the processes involved in changing her surname (as a result of the nullification of her parents’ marriage).  Once her birth certificate has been duly annotated with the necessary changes (on her last name), she may apply for her passport once again.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/index.php/2013-04-04-06-59-48

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02-07

A child born out of wedlock is an illegitimate child.  Under the law, such children shall carry their mother’s last name on their birth certificates unless their father provides his consent to let the child use his last name.  In cases when the parents of an illegitimate child decide to marry later on, the child’s status is effectively changed to “legitimate”.  And as a legitimzied child, he or she is given the same entitlements as that of a legitimate child, retroacting to the time of the child’s birth.  This includes the child’s right to use her father’s surname.

So how come “legitimized” children, who have been using their father’s last name since after their parents got married (after their birth), are still required to execute an AUSF (Affidavit to Use Surname of Father) if they want to use their father’s last name on their passports?  (Otherwise, their passports shall bear the last name of the mother as if their birth right is still illegitimate).

When a child is “legitimized”, certain procedures must be undertaken in order to apply the child’s father’s last name on the child’s birth certificate.  Unless the necessary amendments and attachments have been officially applied on the child’s birth certificate, her right to use her father’s last name may still be questioned.

When applying for a passport, the DFA requires a copy of the applicant’s PSA Birth Certificate.  This shall be their basis for the person’s information, including and most especially, the person’s name.  If the birth certificate is not supported by documents attesting to the fact that the person has been “legitimized”, he or she may not be able to use the father’s last name on his passport.

If you were legitimized (due to subsequent marriage of your parents), you need to accomplish the following in relation to your use of your father’s last name:

a. Visit the office of the Local Civil Registrar where your birth was registered and secure the following documents:

  • Affidavit of Paternity/Acknowledgment (certified photocopy)
  • Joint Affidavit of Legitimation
  • Certification of Registration of Legal Instrument (Affidavit of Legitimation)
  • Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate with remarks/annotation based on the legitimation by subsequent marriage.

b. Verify that the birth certificate (of the legitimated child) and the marriage contract of the parents have been certified by the PSA.  If not, secure it from the city or municipal Civil Registrar’s Office where the child was registered and where the parents were married.

When applying for a passport and you would like to use your father’s last name:

  • Bring a copy of your PSA Birth Certificate.
  • Check to make sure that your copy includes an annotation regarding your new status as legitimated.
  • If the legitimized child is still a minor, the mother must be present during the passport application.
  • If the mother is abroad, the person accompanying the child (including the father), must be able to execute the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.

A legitimized child may use her father’s last name on her passport provided her PSA Birth Certificate bears the necessary annotations regarding her legitimation and documented proof that the father has allowed the child to use his last name (AUSF, Affidavit of Support and Consent).

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

https://psa.gov.ph/content/application-requirements

http://www.manilatimes.net/illegitimate-child-has-to-use-mothers-surname/230283/

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