Tag Archive: PSA CENOMAR


8 Aug 22 (1)

My friend remembers that one of the most challenging things she had to accomplish for her wedding was securing a marriage license.  She recalls having a handful of questions about it but not being able to find anything of value online.  She ended up visiting the Quezon City hall where she finally got a list of the things she needs to prepare, the fees she needs to pay, and answers to her FAQs.

Her experience inspired me to write today’s blog and I hope that this too can help other would-be brides and grooms in preparing for their wedding (at least on getting the marriage license part, haha!).  Here are the questions she had in mind then; I turned them into FAQs!

Can I apply for a marriage license in Metro Manila even if my wedding will be held in Baguio?  I work in Manila and have lived her (temporarily) for seven years.  I was born and raised in Baguio.

Yes, you can.  Actually, you can apply for a marriage license at any of the following areas:

  • Where you or your fiance reside.
  • At your or your fiance’s hometown.

Just remember that when applying for a marriage license, you need to personally appear at the city hall or municipal hall – you cannot send a representative to secure the license for you.

You can use the marriage license anywhere in the Philippines.

What are the requirements I need to prepare?

  1. Duly accomplished marriage license application form (four copies).
  2. PSA birth certificates of the bride and groom.
  3. PSA Certificate of No Marriage (CENOMAR)
  4. Certificate or proof that you have completed the required marriage counseling or seminar. There are some cities and municipalities that require the couple to attend the marriage counseling and the family planning seminar even if you have attended this before. Always check with the city hall and don’t be surprised if this is part of their requirements.
  5. Government-issued IDs such as your passport, UMID, Voter’s ID, SSS or GSIS, etc.
  6. Of course, your personal appearance.

Any other additional requirements I should know of?

Some city halls may require you to submit additional documents so it is best to have the following ready as well:

  1. Baptismal certificate
  2. Residence certificate/Tax certificate/CEDULA

Prepare photocopies of your documents as the city hall is sure to ask for copies for their records.

How do I file for a marriage license?

Once you have all the documents ready, you can file your application at the city or municipal hall of your choice.

Marriage license fees range between Php 280 to Php 350.  You can verify at the Treasurer’s office before you begin your transaction, just to be sure.

You will be issued a receipt after payment; this shall also serve as your claim stub.  Normally, a marriage license is released within 10 days after filing and payment.

Your marriage license is valid only for 120 days from the date of issue.  If you do not get married within the prescribed period, you will have to go through the entire process of securing a marriage license again, including the seminars.

If this article helped you share it with someone too!

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2 Feb 23

Last week, the President signed into law the bill that intends to automatically enroll every Filipino in the National Health Insurance Program or Republic Act No. 11223.  The program will be handled by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation or PhilHealth.

What can Filipinos look forward to with the new health law?

Every Pinoy is now considered to possess immediate eligibility and therefore, must have access to all aspects of health care including:

  1. Preventive Health Care:
    1. Wellness visits and standard immunizations
    2. Screenings for blood pressure, cancer, cholesterol, depression, obesity.
    3. Pediatric screenings for hearing, vision, and developmental disorders.
    4. Other similar procedures.
  2. Promotive Health Care
    1. Child and family nutrition
    2. Injury prevention
    3. Physical activities
    4. Smoking cessation programs
    5. Other similar procedures.
  3. Curative Health Care
    1. Chemotherapy
    2. Antibiotics
    3. Radiation therapy
    4. Dialysis treatment
    5. Surgeries
  4. Rehabilitative Health Care
    1. Physical and occupational therapy
    2. Speech-language pathology
    3. Psychiatric rehabilitation services
    4. Other similar procedures.
  5. Palliative Health Care
    1. For patients with chronic diseases and need oxygen support.
    2. End-stage heart failure
    3. Debilitating stroke
    4. Cancer that has spread beyond the original tumor/site.
    5. End-stage liver failure, kidney failure, or multi-system organ failure.
    6. End-stage HIV/AIDS that does not respond to anti-viral treatments.
    7. Other similar cases.
  6. Medical, dental, mental, and emergency health services

Patients needing such medical assistance (or any other type of assistance not mentioned above) would be registered with a primary health care provider of their choice and will be included in PhilHealth’s primary care benefits package.

In order for PhilHealth to sustain the demand for quality health care under the new law, membership rates will gradually increase by .5% annually.  This, too, shall cause income ceilings for contributions to go up by Php 10,000 per year.  Contributory members can look forward to getting more benefits as their premiums increase to encourage the able members to pay higher premiums.

What are your thoughts on the Universal Health Care law?  We’d be glad to know.

 

References:

www.doh.gov.ph

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2 Feb 20.jpg

Do you have a problem with the entries in your birth date, month, or year in your birth certificate?  Like any other error, your birth date details are as vital because it indicates your age – a vital requirement for job applications, getting a driver’s license, school enrollment, and other transactions that have age requirements.  If your birth date details are erroneous or inaccurate, you have to have these corrected right away.

Here’s how:

  1. Wrong Birth Date

The owner may file a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error at the Local Civil Registry (LCR) where the birth record containing the day in the date of birth to be corrected is registered.

If the petitioner has migrated to another place within the Philippines and may no longer be practical for him to travel back to his birthplace, the petition may be filed with the LCR of the place where the petitioner is currently residing.

If the petitioner’s birth was reported abroad and is presently residing in the Philippines, the petition may be filed with the LCR of the place of residence following the procedures of the migrant petition.

  1. Wrong Birth Month

The process to correct a wrong birth month in your birth certificate is similar with correcting an incorrect birth date.

  1. Wrong Birth Year

This type of error in the birth certificate is not covered by R.A. No. 9048 or the Clerical Error Law of 2001.  Errors in the civil register pertaining to a person’s age (determined by the year of birth indicated in his birth certificate) need to undergo a court proceeding and with the aid of a lawyer.

Note that the fees for the amendment of wrong birth date and month that LCRs may charge may vary.  Always make sure that you pay only to the LCR cashier and that you are issued a government receipt after paying.  You will need this later on when claiming the first corrected copy of your birth certificate.

The fees and processes for the correction of an incorrect birth year will all depend on the attorney’s fees and LCR that shall handle the case.  Again, make sure you are paying only to the city hall cashier and are issued the necessary official receipt from the government.

We have a summary of solutions to the most common PSA birth certificate problems!  Read our blog, Common PSA Birth Certificate Problems (and their solutions!).

Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

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2 Feb 19

Another common birth certificate error involves the owner’s last name (family name).  This could either be blurred, misspelled, or missing (especially if the child is illegitimate).  Unlike first and middle names, correcting the last name can be complicated as some cases require the intervention of a lawyer or a court proceeding.

Today, we are going to feature four cases of last name issues on a birth certificate and how each can be addressed.

  1. Blurred Last Name

Solution 1: If the record of PSA is blurred, you may request the Local Civil Registrar to endorse a copy of your birth certificate with a clearer entry in the last name to the PSA.

Solution 2: If the record of the PSA and the civil registry are both blurred, file a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.

Supporting Documents:

  • Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  • Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business records, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  • Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  • Payment of One Thousand Pesos (Php 1,000) as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50.00 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  • Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.
  1. Misspelled Last Name

If the cause of the error is clearly typographical, causing the last name to look and sound foolish, this can be corrected by filing a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.

Supporting Documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  3. Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  4. Payment of One Thousand Pesos (Php 1,000) as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

  1. No Last Name

If the last name in the birth certificate is blank, a supplemental report should be filed to supply the missing entry.

To supply the missing entry, an affidavit indicating the entry missed in the registration and the reasons why there was a failure in supplying the required entry.  Supporting documents should be provided to show the name of the child.

Supporting Documents:

To supply the missing entry, an affidavit indicating the entry missed in the registration and the reasons why there was a failure in supplying the required entry.  Other supporting documents should be provided to show the first name of the child.

Take note that the LCR or the PSA will advise you of the best course to take when having your birth certificate entries corrected, especially when the error involves your last name.  Always remember that there is a very big possibility that you will be endorsed to a lawyer and a court proceeding may be required to apply the needed corrections.

Reference: http://www.psa.gov.ph/

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2 Feb 13

Most people think that a misspelled name in a birth certificate can be easily rectified by filing a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error, as stipulated in RA 9048.  However, there are cases when misspelled names may only be corrected through a court proceeding and with the assistance of a lawyer.

Correcting vs. Changing

A typographical error, a misplaced or missing letter, or an error that causes the name to sound funny, unintelligible, and downright erroneous, can be corrected by filing a Petition for Correction.  This is done at the Local Civil Registry office of the person’s birthplace.

If the error causes the name to change, but can still be considered as a valid name, it may not be counted a typo error.  This means that you will have to seek the advice of a lawyer and the case may have to undergo a court proceeding in order for the name’s spelling to be corrected.

Example:

The child’s name is Lea but the name printed on her birth certificate is Lhea.  Both spellings can be considered as ‘correct’ but since the child’s name is Lea and not Lhea, you will essentially be requesting for the name to be ‘changed’ instead of corrected.  Changing a name in a birth certificate (whether first, middle, or last name) has to undergo court proceedings; the changes will be applied after the court has decided on the petition.

This is the reason why would-be parents need to carefully check the Certificate of Live Birth document that is usually accomplished by the hospital.  Whatever is written there will be considered as true and correct by the LCR and will then reflect in the child’s birth certificate for the rest of his life.  Correcting entries can be time-consuming and expensive; this can be avoided by diligently checking all entries in the document before submitting to the LCR and by making sure that the birth certificate owner uses the same information in his or her birth certificate in all of his IDs and transactions, for the rest of his life.  Any discrepancy between the entries in the birth certificate and his IDs and other documents could cause delays and denials in his applications and transactions.

Who Shall File the Correction or Change (of first name’s spelling):

  • Owner of the record
  • Owner’s spouse
  • Children
  • Parents
  • Siblings
  • Grandparents
  • Guardians
  • Any other person duly authorized by law or by the owner of the document sought to be corrected;
  • If the owner of the record is a minor or physically or mentally incapacitated, the petition may be filed by his spouse, or any of his children, parents, siblings, grandparents, guardians, or persons duly authorized by law.

Where to file the petition for correction:

If born in the Philippines:

  • The petition shall be filed with the local civil registry office of the city or municipality where the birth is registered.
  • When the petitioner had already migrated to another place within the Philippines and it would not be practical for such party to appear in person with the civil registrar of the place of birth, the petition may be filed with the civil registry office where he/she is currently residing.

If born abroad:

  • The petitioner may file at the Philippine Consulate where the birth was reported.

Supporting Documents:

  • Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  • Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voters’ affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  • Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  • Payment of Php 1,000 as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  • Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

We have a summary of solutions to the most common PSA birth certificate problems!  Read our blog, Common PSA Birth Certificate Problems (and their solutions!).

Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

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2 Feb 11

I took the MRT last week and was surprised to see long lines of passengers (ladies mostly) waiting for their turn to surrender the bottled liquids in their bags.  I realized then that the MRT has truly implemented its stern policy against bringing liquid (all kinds!) inside the trains.  I wanted to make a u-turn and just try my luck hailing a taxi but I was already running late so with a broken heart, I opened my bag and let the lady guard take my cologne and small lotion bottle.

Among the passengers, was a young mother who had with her a bag filled with baby stuff, including 2 feeding bottles half-filled with water.  Her husband was with her, carrying their baby and they both pleaded with the lady guard to let them take their liquids.  The guard let them but not without taking the mom’s lotion which she insisted was for her baby – it was an expensive bottle of Aveeno.

I heard from the other passengers that the MRT has released a list of liquids that can be permitted inside its stations.  I did a research and am sharing this with all of you now, so you do not play tug-of-war with MRT guards when you find yourself lined up at an MRT station.

  1. Baby formula/breast milk in bottles.

This is only applicable if the mother passenger is traveling with the baby or child.  Otherwise, even the baby formula will have to be surrendered before you are permitted to enter the station.

  1. Drinking water to be used by the baby or child.

Again, the child must be with the passenger in order for the liquids to be permitted inside the station.

  1. All prescription and over-the-counter medications.
  2. Liquids including water, juice, or liquid nutrition or gels for passengers with disabilities or health conditions.
  3. Life support and life-sustaining liquids such as bone marrow, blood products, and transplant organs.
  4. Items used to augment the body and for medical and cosmetic reasons such as mastectomy products, prosthetic breasts, bras, or shells containing gels, saline solution, or other liquids.
  5. Gels or frozen liquids needed to cool disability or medical-related items used by persons with disabilities or medical conditions.

We all know that the reason the MRT has implemented such strict rules is to ensure the safety of its passengers, following the recent explosions that happened in Mindanao.  This is for our safety and so our cooperation is needed in order for the plan to work.

It may be inconvenient for most of us at this time but I personally think that the benefits far outweigh the cost of not carrying your favorite cologne whenever you take the MRT.

Let us know your thoughts.

 

Reference: https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/02/07/19/mrt-releases-list-of-liquids-other-allowed-items-amid-ban-on-bottled-drinks

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2 Feb 06

Do not fall for social media posts saying that the creation and distribution of National IDs have already begun.  This is not true.

I chanced upon a Facebook post last month announcing that Filipinos may start claiming their IDs by December 2018, even citing a TV station as its source.  The post was shared more than 185,000 times.

This information is misleading.  We featured this same topic last month and based on our research, the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA), the agency tasked to manage the National ID implementation, is still in the process of establishing the Philsys Registry Office (PRO).  The PRO shall then oversee the creation and management of the ID system.

In a recent interview with GMA News, the PSA reported that the registration for the first batch of Filipinos and resident aliens for National ID shall begin by the fourth quarter of 2019 and that no registration has started yet.

So do not believe everything that you see in your social media feed.  Always check with reliable sources such as the official pages of news networks, government agencies, and of course, the Master Citizen page!

Reference:

www.gmanetwork.com

www.psa.gov.ph

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1 jan 17

Pag-IBIG offers the provision of home financing programs for both new and repossessed (or acquired) housing properties that were developed by Pag-IBIG.  Active members have the option to purchase an acquired Pag-IBIG property at negotiated rates.

Acquired assets are foreclosed properties (house and lot) that are auctioned off by Pag-IBIG to the public at cheaper rates.  These are not “brand new” houses; these are properties that are repossessed due to non-payment of the original owners.  Once auctioned by Pag-IBIG, it becomes a possible alternative for other active members that are unable to take on the costs of a brand new housing unit.

If you are thinking of applying for a Pag-IBIG housing loan, it may be good to weigh your options and see if an acquired asset is something you can consider.

Here are the steps and requirements needed when applying for a Pag-IBIG loan for acquired properties under negotiated sale:

  1. Reserve the property and pay the Php 1,000 reservation fee (non-refundable/non-transferrable). Bring one valid ID and choose among the following modes of payment:
  • Cash – 30% discount; payment term of 1 month.
  • Installment – 20% discount; up tp 12 months only, with 12% interest rate per annum.
  • Housing Loan – 10% discount, for qualified members of Pag-IBIG Fund; up to 30 years, provided that borrower’s age shall not exceed 70 years old at date of loan maturity.
  1. For purchase through housing loan, submit the complete documentary requirements within 30 calendar days from payment of reservation fee and pay the processing fee of Php 2,000 and Documentary Stamp Tax of Php 100.00.
  2. Receive the Notice of Approval of Loan and pay the one (1) year advance insurance premiums within 30 days.
  3. Execute and submit the notarized Deed of Conditional Sale and other mortgage documents evidencing the loan in favor of the Fund.

Below are the BASIC REQUIREMENTS for:

SELF-EMPLOYED applicants:

  • Accomplished Buyer’s Information Sheet (2 copies) with recent 1×1 ID photo (2 copies).
  • One (1) valid ID (photocopy, back to back) of Principal Buyer and Spouse, Co-Buyer and Spouse, if applicable.
  • Proof of Income for (any of the following):
    1. Owned Business
      • Income Tax Return (ITR)
      • Audited Financial Statements
      • Official Receipt of Tax Payment from bank supported with DTI Registration and Mayor’s Permit/Business Permit.
    2. Commission Base
      • Commission Vouchers reflecting the issuer’s name and contract details (for the last 12 months).
    3. Drivers
      • Certified True Copy of Transport Franchise issued by an appropriated government agency (LGU for tricycles, LTFRB for other PUVs).
    4. Foreign Remittances and Pensions
      • Bank Statements or passbook for the last 12 months (in case income is sourced from foreign remittances, pensions, etc.
    5. Rental Payments
      • Copy of Lease Contract and Tax Declaration (if income is derived from rental payments).
    6. Sari-sari Store/Mini Groceries, Sub-contractor, On-call Maintenance, Technician
      • Brgy. Certificate/Clearance
      • Properly Accomplished Certificate of Engagement, duly notarized.

Additional Requirements:

  • Copy of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) with signature.
  • Photocopy of Php 1,000 reservation fee receipts.
  • Photocopy of 1 valid ID of the signatory in the Certificate of Engagement
  • Insurance Coverage (if applicable only)
    • Health Statement form (Medical Questionnaire)
      • For borrowers over 60 years old
      • For borrowers up to 60 years old, if loans are over P2.0M to P6.0M
    • Health Statement Form (Medical Questionnaire) and a copy of the result of a medical examination conducted prior to assignment overseas as required by the employment agency.
    • For OFW borrowers over 60 years old.

Locally Employed

Basic Requirements:

  • Accomplished Buyer’s Information Sheet (2 copies) with recent 1×1 ID photo (2 copies)
  • One (1) valid ID (photocopy, back to back) of Principal Buyer and Spouse, Co-buyer and Spouse, if applicable.
  • Proof of Income (any of the following):
    • Notarized Certificate of Employment and Compensation (CEC) indicating the gross monthly income and monthly allowances or monthly benefits received by the employee.
    • Certified One (1) month payslip, within the last three (3) months prior to date of loan application.
    • Latest Income Tax Return (ITR) for the year immediately preceding the date of loan application, with attached BIR Form No. 2316, stamped received by the BIR.

Note: Government employees must present one-month payslip issued within the last three months prior to the date of loan application and submitted together with CEC or ITR.

Additional Requirements:

  • Copy of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) with signature.
  • Photocopy of Php 1,000 reservation fee receipt.

Insurance Coverage (if applicable only)

  • Health Statement Form (Medical Questionnaire)
    • For borrowers over 60 years old
    • For borrowers up to 60 years old, if loans are over P2.0M to P6.0M
  • Health Statement Form (Medical Questionnaire) and a copy of the result of the medical examination conducted prior to assignment overseas as required by the employment agency.
    • For OFW borrowers over 60 years old.

If you have more questions about Pag-IBIG’s acquired assets, you may call their hotline at 02-724-4244.  They are available 24×7.

Source: www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

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1 jan 16

Active members of the Pag-IBIG Fund are entitled to avail of housing loan privileges; you can choose to build a house, buy one that is up for sale, or choose from among Pag-IBIG’s acquired assets.  It is the most affordable means to own a home through its payment terms and low interest rates.

To help you get started on your housing loan application, we are sharing Pag-IBIG’s six simple steps as published on their website.

  1. Get your CHECKLIST OF REQUIREMENTS.
  • Housing Loan (HL) application form and other related forms are available at the Servicing Department, 2nd floor JELP Business Solutions Bldg., #409 Shaw Blvd., Mandaluyong City (for NCR accounts) or at any provincial branch office (for provincial accounts). These forms are also downloadable at pagibigfund.gov.ph.
    • Health Statement Form (Medical Questionnaire)
      • For OFW applicants over 60 years old.
      • Loans over P2M to P6M and for borrowers aged up to 60 years old.
    • Health Statement Form (Medical Questionnaire) and Full Medical Examination
      • All borrowers over 60 years old.
  1. Submit your Housing Loan Application to the Pag-IBIG Fund with complete requirements. Pay partial processing fee of Php 1,000 (non-refundable).
  • For NCR properties, file at any of the following:
    • JELP Business Solutions Building – Shaw Blvd., Mandaluyong City.
    • Kamias Branch – #795 Anchor Center EDSA, Quezon City (near GMA Kamuning Station)
    • Imus Branch – Olma Bldg., Emilio Aguinaldo Highway, Imus, Cavite
  • Provincial Properties – To be filed at the Pag-IBIG office nearest the subject property.

Processing Period: 20 working days (inclusive of Credit Investigation and Property Valuation).

You may also file your housing loan application via www.pagibigfund.gov.ph, click “E-Services”.

  1. Receive your Notice of Approval (NOA)/Letter of Guaranty (LOG) and sign your loan documents.
  • NOA will be released only to the borrower or to the Attorney-In-Fact for OFW borrowers, provided with SPA.
  1. Accomplish your NOA requirements for check release.

You are given 90 calendar days to do the following:

  • For purchase of House and Lot/Purchase of Condominium Unit/Purchase of Lot
    • Give LOG to the seller
    • Proceed to the BIR for payment of Capital Gains Tax and Documentary Stamp Tax. The BIR will issue Certificate Authorizing Registration
    • Proceed to the Local Government Unit (LGU) for payment of Transfer Tax.
    • Proceed to the Registry of Deeds (RD) for the transfer of the title and annotation of mortgage.
    • Proceed to the LGU for the transfer of Tax Declaration
    • Submit complete requirements to the Pag-IBIG Fund.
  • For purchase of House and Lot Mortgaged with Pag-IBIG Fund
    • Proceed to the BIR for payment of Captial Gains Tax and Documentary Stamp Tax. The BIR will issue Certificate Authorizing Registration.
    • Proceed to the Local Government Unit (LGU) for payment of Transfer Tax.
    • Go to the Pag-IBIG office to schedule a trip to the Registry of Deeds (RD) for transfer of title and annotation of the mortgage.
    • Proceed to the LGU for transfer of Tax Declaration.
    • Submit complete requirements to the Pag-IBIG Fund.
  • For the construction of House/Home Improvement
    • Proceed to the BIR for payment of Documentary Stamp Tax
    • Proceed to the Registry of Deeds (RD) for annotation of the mortgage.
    • Submit complete requirements to the Pag-IBIG Fund.
  • For refinancing
    • Proceed to the bank/financing institution to give the Letter of Guaranty (LOG) and Loan and Mortgage Agreement (LMA).
    • Proceed to the Registry of Deeds (RD) for annotation of the mortgage.
    • Submit complete requirements to the Pag-IBIG Fund.
  1. Receive loan proceeds at the Pag-IBIG Fund
  • Payee to bring two (2) valid IDs.
  • The payee is either the:
    • Borrower
    • Seller
    • The third party to which the loan proceeds are assigned to be released.
  • Borrower to bring 12 PDCs (if payment is not thru salary deduction).
  • Loan proceeds will be released to the person/institution assigned by the borrower/buyer.
  1. Start paying your monthly amortization.
  • One month from DV/Check Date
  • For house construction/home improvement, one month from DV check date of the final loan release.

For house construction or home improvement, the loan release shall be staggered based on progress of construction.

For more information on Pag-IBIG Housing Loan or any question you may have regarding your Pag-IBIG membership, you may call their hotline at 02-724-4244.

Have you tried applying for a home loan at the Pag-IBIG? Tell us about your experience!

Source: http://www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

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1 jan 15

So the DFA needs our help in rebuilding their database and we can do so by presenting a copy of our PSA birth certificate when renewing our passports.  Do you have a copy of your birth certificate yet?

I used to keep several copies of my birth certificate in my desk; these were printed on the old yellowish sheet with NSO’s logo on the upper left hand (or was it right?) corner of the document.  When my passport was due for renewal last June 2016, I was advised by my friend to secure a new copy of my birth certificate before going to the DFA for my application.

“Bakit, may expiration ba ang birth certificate? Di ba wala naman?”

Of course, my birth certificate does not have an expiration date!  What my friend was trying to tell me (pala!) was that the PSA (formerly NSO), regularly updates (or maybe, reprints) the copies of our documents on security papers to discourage the circulation of unauthorized and fake copies made elsewhere.  Embassies and other government agencies are duly advised whenever the PSA is set to release certificates printed on new security papers so that these offices would know when the documents being presented to them are updated copies or old files (like my copies of my birth certificate).

So if you think you still have several copies of your birth certificate left in your stash, check them now to make sure these are updated ones.  Foremost, it must bear the new seal of the PSA, and not the former NSO.  If your document is worn out, has some minute tears, or the entries are hardly readable, please get yourself new copies.

I got my latest copies from PSAHelpline.ph.  It’s an online, one-stop birth certificate ordering site for all types of PSA documents you will ever need: birth, marriage, CENOMAR, and death certificates.  They deliver nationwide too so you won’t have to go to a PSA office anymore.

Birth, marriage, and death certificates cost Php 365.00 per copy while the CENOMAR costs Php 465.00 per copy.  Visit their user-friendly website now so you can place your orders ahead of the others!

Word of the wise: As soon as you have confirmed an appointment with the DFA for your passport application or renewal, get new copies of your PSA birth certificate and marriage certificate (for married female applicants who wish to change their last name in their passport).  Don’t wait until the last minute to do this because it’s a primary documentary requirement, especially if your old passport is not an e-passport.

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