Tag Archive: birth certificate correction


May 28

One of the leading causes of death in the Philippines remains to be uncontrolled hypertension leading to heart disease and stroke.  In 2017, it was reported that 25% of Pinoy adults have high blood pressure caused by either their lifestyle or inherited the condition from their parents and elders.  The climate and high fat, high sodium diet in the Philippines do very little to help Filipinos avoid the burden of hypertension.

The good news is that hypertension is a manageable disease and the patient is likely to keep its complications at bay with low-cost preventive measures like exercise and diet changes.  Regular visits to one’s physician and easy access to an emergency room can help arrest any adverse effects of an elevated blood pressure as well.

It is good to know that hypertension is covered by the PhilHealth and is available to all bona fide members and their dependents.  Below are some important things you need to remember when claiming your PhilHealth benefits for cases of hypertension:

  1. PhilHealth will cover up to Php 9,000.00 for hypertension cases, where:
  • 30% is for professional fees (Php 2,700.00);
  • 70% for room and board, drugs, supplies, ancillary tests, laboratory, and other procedures (Php 6,300.00).
  1. Benefits for hypertension cases are covered by the No Balance Billing (NBB) policy.
  • Hospitals should be able to provide the complete and quality service for hypertensive Philhealth member patients.
  • The member patient should no longer make out-of-pocket payments for his room, board, medicines, supplies, laboratory, X-ray procedures, and professional fees.
  1. Member patients can claim from PhilHealth only if they are admitted to the hospital (not outpatient cases or emergency room only).
  2. The benefits of hypertension cases are covered by the Single Period of Confinement (SPC) rule. This means that only one claim for hypertension benefits can be applied every 90 days.

A hypertensive person’s blood pressure can shoot up anytime.  It is best to always be armed with your PhilHealth benefits to help ease the burden of hospital expenses.  Of course, the best way to keep yourself from the hassles of hospital confinement and expenses is to exert extra efforts in making sure that you lead a healthy lifestyle:

  • Grab every opportunity to walk instead of riding your car, a cab, or even the elevator.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Avoid salty food and those that are high in cholesterol.
  • Get enough sleep.
  • Free your mind of negative thoughts.

Have a hypertensive-free summer, folks!

 

Source: www.philhealth.gov.ph

 

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May 03 - 2 (1)

Are you planning to buy a house soon?  Have you considered getting one through a Pag-IBIG housing loan?

Here are some facts and figures that could help you decide on availing a real estate property through your Pag-IBIG membership.

  • Lower interest rates for Regular Housing Loan

Effective February 14, 2018, the Pag-IBIG began offering home loan interest rates for as low as 5.67% per annum (from 5.5%) for a 1-year fixing period, and 6.37% per annum (from 6.5%) for a 3-year fixing period.  This applies to members who are willing to pay a 25% equity upfront.

Members can borrow up to P6-million, depending on their monthly salary and the loan may be payable up to 30 years.

Pag-IBIG boasts that their interest rates are at an all-time low this year (2018) and therefore, is the best time to avail of a housing loan from the agency.

  • More affordable pabahay for minimum-wage earners.

Lowest interest rate at 3% per annum.

Roughly P1,897.22 monthly amortization for the first five years of a P450,000 loan, over a 30-year repayment period).

No equity

For developer-assisted housing loans up to the prevailing maximum limit for socialized housing loan, the LTV ratio shall be 100% provided the developer’s License to Sell is for a socialized housing project and the loan purpose is for the purchase of a residential unit.

Longer loan term of up to 30 years.

Only 7 documents to apply!

  • Pag-IBIG offers Online Housing Loan Application.

You have the option to submit your application online at http://www.pagibigfund.gov.ph/HousingLoan

  • Housing Loan Programs Orientation
    • Every Saturday at 2/F JELP Business Solutions Building, 409 Shaw Blvd., Mandaluyong City
    • Every 2nd Saturday of the month at 3/F Lecture Hall B, Legislative Building, Quezon City Hall.
    • Every 3rd Saturday of the month at Rizal Provincial Capitol Multi-purpose Hall, Antipolo City

All orientation programs run from 9Am to 11AM and are given for free to all interested housing loan applicants.

For more information about Pag-IBIG housing loans, you may call their hotline at 02-724-4244 or visit their website at www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

 

Reference:  http://www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

 

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May 03 - 1

In a previous article, we featured the guidelines on how you can be sure that you are eligible to claim your PhilHealth benefits after you have been confined and treated in a hospital.  There are cases, however, when even a qualified PhilHealth member is not able to fully enjoy his privileges in spite of showing sufficient proof that he or she must be afforded his PhilHealth benefits.  Sadly though, the causes of these issues are often due to the medical facility’s negligence and refusal to abide by the policies set by PhilHealth for its affiliated clinics and hospitals.

To help you maximize your PhilHealth benefits, here are four important tips you need to know when applying your privileges as a PhilHealth member:

  • PhilHealth does not refund benefits directly to members.

This means that the hospital or clinic must deduct the amount of PhilHealth’s participation in your treatment, from your total hospital bill.  The benefits may not be converted to cash that the hospital “pays” to the patient.

  • The PhilHealth benefit must be applied AFTER other tax deductions, including the Senior Citizen discount.

The Senior Citizen discount and Value-added Tax (VAT) are different from PhilHealth benefits.  If the patient is a Senior Citizen, the SC and VAT must first be deducted from his total hospital bill, before his PhilHealth benefits are applied.

This computation is applicable only if the No Balance Billing was not applied to the patient’s case.

  • 3 Must-have documents when claiming your PhilHealth benefits:
    • PhilHealth Claim Form 1 (CF1)
    • Member Data Record (MDR)
    • Contributions Record
  • PhilHealth members with complete documents must not be made to pay the hospital bill in full.

Some health institutions make the patient pay the full hospital bill with the promise of refunding them their PhilHealth benefits after they have received the funds from PhilHealth.

This is not how PhilHealth benefits are disbursed to members.

Should the hospital demand that you pay the bill in full, even after you have satisfied all requirements for the application of your PhilHealth benefits, report them right away to PhilHealth.  Most hospitals have PhilHealth helpdesks in its premises; you may also call the PhilHealth call center at 02-441-7442.

Reference: www.philhealth.gov.ph

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Feb 08-a

Question: Can I apply for a passport even if my gender in my PSA birth certificate is wrong? I can have this corrected but that will take time. I already have an appointment with the DFA and I need my passport asap.

Answer: You may go ahead and appear at the DFA on the date of your appointment, bring all the required IDs and supporting documents as listed in the passport.gov. website.  You may be required by the DFA to submit an Affidavit of Undertaking in support of your claim that your birth certificate is undergoing a correction. Take note that the DFA may also simply advise you to come back when a copy of your birth certificate is already available.  It is up to you to explain to them why you still cannot execute a copy of the document.

Question: My wife and I will be accompanying our 3-year-old son for his passport application. Can we both access the priority lane so we can have our passports renewed at the same time?

The Priority Lanes at DFA offices are reserved for Senior Citizens, OFWs, PWDs, pregnant women, and children below 7 years old.  Only one companion is allowed to be with the applicant inside the DFA premises; only this companion may take advantage of the no-appointment privilege.

Question: My middle and last names were interchanged in my birth certificate so that my last name appears to be my middle name, and my middle name appears to be my last name.  What do I do? 

This can be corrected by filing a Petition for Correction at the LCR of the city or municipality where the birth was registered.  It would be wise to prepare copies of your parents’ PSA birth certificates as well to serve as supporting documents to your petition.

Question: When our daughter was born, we weren’t married yet.  We placed a false date of marriage in our daughter’s birth registration. Now we are already married, how do we correct the date of marriage in our child’s birth certificate?

Never, under any circumstance, place false information in your civil registry documents.  These types of cases need to be referred to a lawyer and may undergo a court proceeding.

Question: My child is 2 years old and is already registered at the LCR.  Can I add three more letters to his name when I get his PSA birth certificate?  Is there a fee for this and how much?

If the error is considered clerical (typographic error), you may simply file a petition for correction.  However, if the petitioner wants to “change” the name (in this case, add a few letters to the original name), you will be asked by the LCR why you wish to do so.  Your request may be granted (or denied!), depending on the veracity of your reason for changing the name.

Question: Will the DFA accept the LCR petition letter as proof that the spelling of my name in my birth certificate is already in process. I already have an appointment for passport interview.

No.  You will have to wait until your PSA birth certificate is made available.  The DFA will only accept birth certificates in PSA Security Paper.

Question: Can we apply for the late registration of birth certificate of a deceased person?  We need his birth certificate so we can claim the death benefits. 

You will have to explain to the LCR why you need to “late register” the birth of a deceased person.  Normally, this type of request is not allowed.

Question: I am scheduled to pick up my PSA birth certificate on February 13, 2018 between 1PM to 4PM at the Releasing Area, 5th floor of PSA Sta. Mesa. However, I can’t make it to Manila on the said date.  Is it okay if I pick it up after February 13?

Yes.  Requested PSA documents are kept on file for 30 days until the requesting party comes to claim the document.  PSA reserves the right to dispose of the documents if these remain unclaimed for more than 30 days.

Question: When I was 18 years old, I was “married” to my girlfriend who was only 17 years old then. We separated a few years later and I found out she got married to another man. I am planning to marry my partner too but when I requested for my CENOMAR, the details of my previous marriage are written on the document.  When I asked my ex, she said that her CENOMAR did not show the same.  What do I do?

In order for you to be allowed to remarry, your previous marriage must be dissolved by virtue of an annulment.  There is a huge possibility that your petition for an annulment will be easily granted because both you and your ex-wife were underage at the time you were supposedly married.

Question: I had my birth certificate “endorsed” by the LCR to the PSA.  How many days or weeks or months does it usually take before I am able to get a PSA copy of my birth certificate?

Normally, a week after you are given a copy of the finality an endorsement with the courier receipt by the LCR, you may begin following up at the PSA Sta. Mesa office, building 2.  Bring all the documents given to you by the LCR as proof of your transaction.

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Jan 08 (3)

Errors in your civil registry documents could adversely affect your transactions with the government or private establishments.  Often, erroneous birth certificates and other documents from the PSA are referred to the LCR of the place where the birth, death, or marriage was originally recorded.  Misspelled names and other obvious clerical corrections are rectified through a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error while more complicated cases are referred to a legal counsel or, sometimes, are heard in court.

One way or the other, the error is corrected or the missing information is supplied, and the owner of the civil registry document is then able to acquire an accurate copy of his PSA certificate.

After the correction process is completed, can the owner get a copy of his PSA document by ordering online or over the phone?

Why are there cases where even after the owner has satisfied all of the LCR’s requirements to apply the needed correction, the PSA’s copy of the same document remains erroneous?

We did our research and found out that the first corrected copy of any civil registry document (birth, death, marriage) that underwent correction or legal proceeding must be claimed at the PSA head office located at the Solicarel Building along Ramon Magsaysay Avenue, in Sta. Mesa, Manila.  Your best landmark is the LRT Pureza Station.

The first corrected copies must be claimed personally by the owner or the requesting party at the head office.  This too will trigger the PSA to provide the corrected copy of your succeeding requests that can then be done online or by phone (www.psahelpline.ph).  If you will insist on getting a corrected copy by ordering online, you will always get the old, erroneous copy.

If you have advised the LCR of the correction on your civil registry document but are still getting the erroneous copy from the PSA, chances are the corrected copy was not properly endorsed to the PSA.  If this happens, go back to the LCR where you filed the correction and ask for a copy of the endorsement made for your documents.  If they are able to provide you one, bring it to the PSA head office and use it as a supporting document for your request.  If the LCR does not have an endorsement, that means that the corrections applied to your civil registry certificate have not been properly communicated to the PSA yet.  Advise the LCR to endorse the corrected copy and inquire how long you need to wait before you may request for the corrected authenticated copy from the PSA.

Make sure to bring an endorsement from the LCR where the correction was initiated (usually, the LCR of the city or municipality where you were born or married) when requesting for the first corrected copy of your document.

If you have questions about PSA documents such as birth, marriage, death, and CENOMAR, send us a message and we will find the best answers for you.

Reference: http://www.psa.gov.ph

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05 - 29

The Philippines is the bastion of Christianity in Asia with over 93% of our population listed as Christians; we ranked 5th worldwide according to a 2011 report of the Philippine Daily Inquirer.  Filipinos take religiosity pretty seriously.  To us, it is not just some form of affiliation or membership, it is a legacy passed on to us, an identity we must protect and preserve at all costs.

And so it IS a big deal to have to find out that your religion, as written in your birth certificate, is anything but Catholic or Christian. 

Such was the case of Arabah Joy Quinto, a Roman Catholic by birth.  After receiving an Exchange Scholar grant from her high school, she immediately applied for a passport at the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA).  She thought she had all the needed documents prepared until she was required to submit a certificate from the Office of Muslim Affairs (OMA)!  Apparently, her birth certificate shows that her parents are Muslims.  She insisted that her entire family has always been devout Roman Catholics, all of them baptized by the Catholic Church as supported by their birth certificates.  The DFA would have none of it; either she presents the required OMA or have the entries in her birth certificate corrected.

How to Correct a ‘Wrong Religion’?

There are two ways of rectifying incorrect entries in a birth certificate:

  1. Under RA No. 9048 or Clerical Error Law (as amended by RA 10172) if the matter involved correcting typographical errors in the First Name, Place of Birth, Day and month of Birth , or Gender.
  2. Through a petition in court if the correction is not covered by any of the above cases.

Correcting the entries in ‘Religion’ is not included in the errors covered by RA 9048 or 10172.

In this case, Arabah Joy needs to file a petition for Correction of Entry in the Regional Trial Court of the place where her birth was registered.  Once filed, the court shall set the case for a hearing, followed by publication of the correction in a local newspaper.

As soon as the petition is granted, the LCR of Arabah’s birth place will receive a certified copy of the court’s decision.  The LCR will be directed to apply the necessary annotations on Arabah’s birth certificate, so that the same shall now reflect her parents’ correct religion.

The first corrected copy of Arabah’s birth certificate may be requested from a PSA office while succeeding copies may be ordered online at www.psahelpline.ph

If you have questions about civil registration in the Philippines, please feel free to drop usa  line and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Sources:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.gov.ph (The Family Code of the Philippines)

www.manilatimes.net

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05 - 15

Aling Nelia is a housewife and a mother of five children.  On her 57th birthday, her kids pooled their resources and surprised her with a round-trip ticket to Hong Kong as it has always been her ardent dream to see the place.

She began working on the required documents while waiting for her passport application appointment at the DFA.  However, when she got hold of her PSA birth certificate, she realized that her name is misspelled on the document.  Her real name, and the name that she has used all her life, is Cornelia Pineda Mangosing, while the name written in her birth certificate is Cornelio Pineda Mangosing.

At first glance, it looked like all Aling Nelia had to do was file a petition for correction of a clerical error on her birth certificate.  After all, it was just one letter – “o” in Cornelio should be changed to “a” to make it Cornelia.  However, when she sought assistance from the Local Civil Registry, she was informed that it is not as simple as it seemed.

What is the difference between correction of clerical error and change of name?

A lot, actually.

Correction of clerical error is covered by R.A. 9048 where an error in a birth certificate is corrected without the need to file a case in court, hire a lawyer, and attend hearings.  The corrections are applied by the LCR where the birth was registered.  RA 9048 may be applied if the error or errors are clearly typhographical in nature – harmless and innocuous.  An evidence of which is that the name, in its erroneous form, sounds ridiculous and tainted with dishonor.

On the other hand, a name that was supposedly misspelled but is still acceptable as a name, may not always be considered misspelled and therefore, may not be covered by the provisions of RA 9048.  Correcting such kinds of entries in a birth certificate follows a different process.

Cornelio vs. Cornelia

Aling Nelia’s name, as far as she is concerned, is misspelled.  Her name is Cornelia, not Cornelio.  Her argument is valid and she has all the documents to prove her claim.  However, the supposed misspelled name, Cornelio, is in itself, a name!  Changing the last letter to make it Cornelia would mean just that – changing the name – not merely correcting the spelling.

What should be done then?

Aling Nelia may resort to have the correction applied through a judicial proceeding.  She needs to file a verified petition in the Regional Trial Court of her birth place or where the LCR is located.  The rest of the procedures she needs to follow are outlined in Rule 108 of the Rules of Court in order to apply the necessary “correction”.  This may be better explained to her by a lawyer.

It may seem strange to have to go through a rather complicated process when all Aling Nelia wanted was to set her records straight and align the name on her birth certificate with the name that she had been using all her life.  At this point, she actually has two options: she could have her name changed through a court proceeding, or simply adopt “Cornelio” being the registered name and drop “Cornelia”.  The latter, of course, would be a ridiculous choice.

This is another reminder for all of us to always be careful when accomplishing public documents such as Certificates of Live Birth, Marriage Certificates, and Death Certificates.  An honest mistake may lead to a string of complications that may affect important transactions such as passport applications and benefit claims.

If you have questions regarding your birth certificate or think that there might be an error you need to rectify, proceed to the LCR office where your birth was registered.  You may also drop us a line and we will do our best to find the most accurate answers for you.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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04 - 26 (1)

I came across this interesting article on yet another case of a defective NSO-certified (now PSA) birth certificate.  The writer narrated how his grandson’s passport application was denied because the kid’s birth certificate lacked the proper entries in the birthplace field.  To get the matter straightened out, the birth certificate owner needs to seek the assistance of the Civil Registry of Manila, wait for four months, and pay (exorbitant) fees.  All because a government employee supposedly neglected double-checking the entries on the child’s birth certificate before having it officially registered and submitted to the PSA.

The taxpayer in me wants to simply believe that the LCR employee who handled the filing of the child’s birth certificate is entirely at fault.  After all, it is part of their job to go over the entries in the document before making it official.

The former government employee in me (not from the LCR though) wants to think otherwise.

The fact remains that the Certificate of Live Birth, which is handed to the parents or relatives of the newborn child, either by a hospital staff, the midwife, or right at the LCR office, is accomplished in the presence of the parents or relatives.  They are then given enough time to review the contents of the document (30 calendar days from the date of birth), and when satisfied, affix their signatures at the bottom of the page, before this is submitted to the LCR and to the PSA.

How then are LCR employees accountable for erroneous entries on birth certificates when all they actually do is receive and file the documents for authentication of the PSA?

The Certificate of Live Birth is an official, public document similar with other forms we fill out at banks, schools, and government offices.  We are expected to provide our most accurate and updated information when filling out these forms to ensure that our transactions are processed seamlessly.  We do not let other people accomplish these documents for us.

We should treat our children’s Certificates of Live Birth the same way, bearing in mind that all information we allow to be written on this document shall serve as our children’s lifelong records, to be used as references of their identification and family history.  Oversights and errors will definitely cause them unnecessary delays and expenses in the future.

We wish to thank the article’s writer for sharing his experience; may we all learn a thing or two from this incident and take it upon ourselves to ascertain that our family’s civil registry documents are filled out accurately.

Because at the end of the day, you have no one else to blame for errors on your children’s birth certificates, except yourself.

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Manila City Hall_15

Here are the requirements you need to prepare when filing for a correction on your maiden middle name after you have been married.

What to bring:

  1. 2 latest certified/local copies and 2 latest PSA (formerly NSO) birth certificate to be corrected.
  2. 2 latest certified copy of marriage contract of the document owner.
  3. 2 latest certified copies of PSA birth certificate of at least 2 children of the document owner.
  4. 2 copies of baptismal certificate of the document owner.
  5. 2 copies of school records (Elementary, High School, or College – form 137 or Transcript of Records).
  6. 2 certified copies of voter’s registration record/voter’s affidavit (COMELEC).
  7. 2 latest original NBI Clearance (purpose: For Change of Name).
  8. 2 latest original PNP Clearance (purpose: For Change of Name).
  9. 2 copies of valid ID of the petitioner and the document owner and 1 copy of latest Community Tax Certificate from the place of work or residence.
  10. Other documents which the LCR may consider relevant and necessary for the approval of the Petition, such as the following:
    • GSIS/SSS Records
    • Medical Records
    • Business Records
    • School Records
    • Insurance
    • Land Title
    • Bank Passbook

All marriage contracts, birth and death certificates to be submitted should be latest certified photocopies when issued in Manila.  If issued outside Manila, must be on Security Paper of PSA (formerly NSO).

Steps to Follow:

  1. Submit all requirements to RA 9048 receiving table for assessment and initial interview.  Please bring all original documents and ID (Table 1 & 2).
  2. Preparation of petition paper (Computer Table).
  3. Proceed to Room 214, City Legal’s Office, and have petition papers notarized.
  4. Pay at the Tax Payer’s Lounge:
    • Registration Fee – P1,000
    • Certified True Copy Fee – P230
    • Transmittal Fee – P210
  5. Proceed to Table 3 for the receiving and filing of petition papers and all other documents.  You will be given a schedule for follow ups as well.

The Manila LCR does not conduct interviews during Fridays.

Source: http://manila.gov.ph/services/civil-registry/

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Father Changed Name on Marriage Certificate

Mildred is the eldest daughter of Mang Gerry and Aling Myrna.  She migrated to the U.S. and earned her citizenship when she married her fiancé who is a natural-born citizen of America.  Two years after she was sworn in, she petitioned for her parents to legally stay in the U.S. with her and her husband.

Part of the requirements she needs to submit were her parents’ birth and marriage certificates.  When she received the copies of the documents, she was surprised to find out that her father’s names on his birth and marriage certificates were different.

On his marriage certificate, his name is written as Gerardo Perez Gonzales.  On his birth certificate, his name is Geronimo Perez Gonzalez.  Mildred knew this will cause delays on her petition if not addressed right away.

She talked to her father about the discrepancies.  Why did he use a different name all his life?  Why did he not tell his wife who he really was?

Mang Gerry admitted that he was not even aware that his real name is Geronimo; his parents and siblings have always referred to him as Gerardo.  All his school records show his name as Gerardo and his last name as Gonzales, not Gonzalez.  In all of his employment records, he used the name Gerardo Gonzales.  He does not have any other record as Geronimo Gonzalez except for his PSA birth certificate.

The family decided to have the entries on Mang Gerry’s birth certificate corrected in order to agree with all his identification cards and personal documents, including the birth certificates of his children where his name is also written as Gerardo Gonzales.

On the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website, www.psa.gov.ph Mang Gerry’s problems on his first and last names are covered by two scenarios:

  1. First name used is different from the first name entered in the birth certificate.
  2. Last name is misspelled.

For both cases, Mang Gerry may file for petitions under R.A. 9048.

To change his first name from Geronimo (written on his birth certificate) to Gerardo (the name he is using), he needs to file a Petition for Change of First Name.  To support his petition, he needs to submit the following documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment records, GSIS/SSS records, medical records, business records, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook.
  3. Notice / Certificate of Posting;
  4. Payment of P3,000 as filing fee.
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar such as:
    • NBI/Police Clearance
    • Civil registry records of ascendants and other clearances as may be required by the concerned civil registry office
    • Proof of Publication

To correct his last name, from Gonzalez to Gonzales, Mang Gerry may file a petition for correction of clerical error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.  For this petition, he needs to submit the following supporting documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/Police Clearance, civil registry records of ascendants.
  3. Notice / Certificate of Posting
  4. Payment of P1,000 as filing fee.
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

Source:

https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/wrong-spelling-0

https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/first-name-used-different-first-name-entered-birth

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