Tag Archive: LCR


June 25a

My sister gave birth last March to twins.  It was her first pregnancy which means that she had to learn all the things that came with it, twice (changing diapers, breastfeeding, etc.).  She said that from the moment her doctor confirmed she was pregnant, she felt as if she was seeing, hearing, tasting, and feeling everything around her for the first time.  Poor girl.

After she gave birth and had somehow adjusted to the life of being a brand new mom, she realized she needed to accomplish one more important thing: she needs to register her babies’ births!

Since she hardly had time to sit and browse through the internet, I volunteered to help her find out how she can have her babies registered at the Local Civil Registry (LCR).

It was then that I came across www.citizenservices.com.ph, an informative website that has the complete (and simplified!) list of things you need to prepare and do when registering your newborn at the LCR.  The information I needed I found under their Mommy Helpline link and if you are first-time Mom, you might want to bookmark this page because they have ALL the things you need to know about preparing your children’s important documents and IDs (like getting his first passport!).   So I simply copy-pasted the instructions and sent it to my sister who was only too glad to receive any kind of help (poor thing!).   Well, in a couple of days after receiving my message, her twins’ birth papers have been registered by my brother-in-law.  Yay!

If you need the same information, click on this link and look under Mommy Helpline.

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05 - 23

Brenda, a Pinay tourist in the US, married her cousin’s friend Doug, a US citizen, while on vacation in Florida.  A few months after the wedding, the couple traveled back to the Philippines to break the news to Brenda’s parents.  Sadly though, her parents vehemently opposed their daughter’s rash decision to marry a person they hardly know.  Because of the sad turn of events, Doug traveled back to the US on his own, leaving Brenda to deal with her family’s shock and disapproval.

Brenda and Doug never got the chance to see each other again.  Soon enough, the incessant email exchanges and nightly phone calls between the newlyweds slowly dwindled to brief text messages and unreturned missed calls.  Before long, Brenda met a new guy at work and quickly fell in love.  This time, she knew he was “the one”.  She introduced him to her parents who immediately approved of their budding romance.  Less than a year later, she was, again, busy planning her wedding.

“Di ba kasal ka na sa U.S.?” asked one of Brenda’s aunts.

“Oo, pero hindi naman niya pinarehistro dito sa Pilipinas yung kasal niya. So single pa din siya dito.” came Brenda’s Mom’s firm reply.

Could this be true?  Can one simply disregard a marriage solemnized in another country by not declaring it before a Local Civil Registry office?  Can you be married in one country and single in another?

We received this same question from an avid reader and thought it wise to find out if overseas marriages are not considered valid in our country.  Below are our findings:

Lex Loci Celebrationis

This is the rule we follow for marriages celebrated abroad between two Filipinos or a Filipino and a person of different citizenship.  The Latin phrase translates to “law of the place of the ceremony”.

This means that the Philippines recognizes a marriage celebrated or solemnized in a different country as long as it follows the requirements set by the law of that state.  Hence, if the marriage is deemed valid in that country, it is then deemed valid in the Philippines, even if it did not comply with the procedures and requirements set the Family Code of the Philippines.

Exceptions to the Rule           

Article 26 of the Family Code excludes the following prohibited marriages:

  1. Cases where a party is below eighteen years old at the time of marriage;
  2. A party is psychologically incapacitated to comply with the essential marital obligations;
  3. Mistake in identity of a spouse;
  4. Subsequent marriages celebrated without properly terminating, liquidating, and distributing the properties of a previous marriage;
  5. Bigamous or polygamous marriages;
  6. Incestuous marriages;
  7. Void marriages for reason of public policy such as marriage between collateral blood relatives up to fourth civil degree or between step-parent and step-child.

If the marriage abroad does not fall under any of the above-mentioned exceptions, then it is considered valid in the Philippines.

But the marriage was not registered in the Philippines

The marriage’s validity is not at all affected by the fact that it was not properly registered in the Philippines.  For as long as it is considered valid in the country where it was celebrated, the marriage is deemed valid in the Philippines as well.  Registering a marriage is done to simply record an event affecting the civil status of the persons involved; it serves as evidence of the act or occurrence.  Its absence does not invalidate the marriage.

Can Brenda continue with her plans of marrying her Filipino boyfriend?

If we are to apply the principles of Lex Loci Celebrationis, Brenda is no longer free to marry another person, in the US or here in the Philippines.  And the only way she can regain her single status and be able to marry another person is if Doug, being the US citizen, files for divorce abroad.

We hope you found these information helpful.  If you have questions about civil registration in the Philippines, please feel free to drop us a line and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source:

www.gov.ph (The Family Code of the Philippines)

http://www.manilatimes.net

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03 - 29

Ang PSA Birth Certificate (dating NSO Birth Certificate) ay madalas na kasama sa listahan ng mga primary documentary requirements ng iba’t-ibang establishments tulad ng mga bangko, eskwelahan, at mga government agencies.  Ang birth certificate ay naka-print sa Security Paper (SECPA) at may selyo ng PSA sa upper left-hand corner ng dokumento.  Maaari itong makuha mula sa mga opisina ng PSA o ipa-deliver sa inyong bahay sa pamamagitan ng pag-order online o pagtawag sa hotline (02 – 737 – 1111).

Habang may mga taong nakakatanggap ng kopya ng kanilang PSA birth certificate, meron din naman na ang natatanggap na kopya ay iyong tinatawag na Negative Certification.  Ang ibig sabihin nito ay walang kopya ang PSA ng kanilang birth certificate.

Bakit Negative Certification ang natanggap ko mula sa PSA?

Ang dalawang dahilan kung bakit may mga nakakatanggap ng Negative Certification mula sa PSA ay:

  • Hindi pa naka rehistro ang kapanganakan ng taong nag request ng birth certificate.
  • Hindi pa nai-submit ng Local Civil Registry ang kopya ng birth certificate sa PSA.

Ano ang dapat kong gawin kapag nakatanggap ako ng Negative Certification?

Nakababahalang matuklasan na walang kopya ang PSA ng iyong birth certificate ngunit may paraan para maayos ito.

May kopya ang LCR ngunit walang kopya ang PSA.

Unahin mong alamin mula sa Local Civil Registry ng lugar kung saan ka ipinanganak kung meron silang record ng iyong kapanganakan.  Kadalasan ay merong naka file ngunit hindi nai-forward sa PSA para ma-certify.  Kung makukumpirma ng LCR na meron ka ngang birth certificate sa files nila, ito ang dapat mong gawin:

  1. Manghingi ng form sa LCR para makapag request ng Endorsement of Records.
  2. Bayaran ang courier fees sa Cashier at ipakita sa LCR ang iyong resibo.  Itago ang resibo bilang katibayan ng iyong filed transaction at binayarang courier fee.
  3. Pagkalipas ng isang linggo, maaari nang mag follow-up sa PSA Sta. Mesa office.  Dalhin ang resibo ng binayarang courier fee sa LCR para mas mabilis na ma-trace ang iyong transaction.

Ang unang kopya ng iyong pina-endorse na dokumento ay sa PSA Sta. Mesa makukuha.  Ang mga susunod na request ng kopya ng iyong PSA birth certificate ay maaari nang ma-order online o sa pagtawag sa PSAHelpline hotline na 02 – 737 -1111.

Walang naka-file na rehistro ng kapanganakan sa LCR.

Kung walang record ng iyong birth certificate na mahahanap ang LCR, ibig sabihin ay hindi narehistro ang iyong kapanganakan.  Wala ka talagang birth certificate at kailangan mong mag file ng Late Registration of Birth.

Maaari itong i-file sa munisipyo ng bayan kung saan ka ipinanganak.  Sakaling sa ibang bayan ka na nakatira, maaari ka na ring mag file sa LCR kung saan ka kasalukuyang naninirahan (Out-of-town Late Registration).

Ano ang requirements para makapag file ng Late Registration of Birth?

  1. Kung less than 18 years old:
    • Apat (4) na kopya ng Certificate of Live Birth na may kumpletong detalye at pirmado ng mga concerned parties.
    • Punuan din ng hinihinging detalye ang Affidavit of Delayed Registration sa likod ng Certificate of Live Birth.  Ang mga impormasyon dito ay magmumula sa ama, ina, o guardian ng may ari ng birth certificate, tulad ng:
      • Pangalan ng bata;
      • Petsa at lugar ng kapanganakan;
      • Pangalan ng ama ng bata kung ito ay illegitimate at kinikilala ng ama;
      • Kung legitimate ang bata, isulat ang petsa at lugar kung saan ikinasal ang mga magulang;
      • Isulat ang dahilan kung bakit hindi na-rehistro ang bata sa loob ng tatlumpung (30) araw mula sa petsa ng kanyang kapanganakan.
  2. Kung 18 years old and above:

Improtanteng ma-kumpirma mo muna na wala ka talagang birth records sa LCR ng iyong birthplace para maiwasan ang tinatawag na Double Registration.  Nangyayari ito kung meron nang birth registration ang isang tao at pagkalipas ng ilang taon ay nagpa-rehistro siyang muli sa ibang munisipyo.  Kung ito ang mangyayari, ang records na susundin ng LCR ay iyong unang registration; ito rin ang record na ipadadala sa PSA for certification.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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02-24

A primary requirement when applying for a passport (or renewing an old one) is the applicant’s birth certificate in Security Paper (SECPA) issued by the Philippine Statistics Authority (formerly NSO) or a Certified True Copy issued by the Local Civil Registrar.  This has become an issue among senior citizens, especially those born on 1945 and earlier years.  Most, if not all, could not secure copies of their birth certificates as these were believed to have been destroyed during and after World War 2.

So how does a Senior Citizen acquire a passport if he could not produce a copy of his birth certificate?  The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) published a special set of requirements specifically for senior citizens born on or after 1950 and those born before 1950.  Read on!

A. First Time Passport Application and born in or after January 1, 1950

  • Personal appearance of senior citizen applicant.
  • Duly accomplished application form – may be downloaded from the DFA website.
  • Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity.
  • For birth record documents (in place of the PSA Birth Certificate):
    • Apply for the delayed registration of birth at the local civil registry office located at the place of birth of applicant.
    • Submit authenticated Birth Certificate from PSA and supporting public documents with correct date and place of birth (i.e. Form 137, Voter’s Registration Record, Baptismal Certificate with readable dry seal or National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) with photo and readable dry seal for Muslim applicants).

B. First Time Passport Application and born before 1950 (December 31, 1949 and earlier):

  • Personal appearance of senior citizen applicant.
  • Duly accomplished application form – may be downloaded from the DFA website.
  • Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity.
  • For birth record documents (in place of the PSA Birth Certificate):
    • Certificate of Non-availability of Record from the PSA.
    • Notarized Joint Birth Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons.
    • Any public document/s with correct full name, date and place of birth (i.e. Baptismal Certificate with readable dry seal or NCMF Certificate with photo and readable dry seal for Muslim applicants).

Senior Citizen passport applicants do not need to secure an appointment online.  They will be accommodated anytime at any DFA branch office.

Share this to families and friends!

Source: http://dfa.gov.ph/renewal-of-passport-requirements

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30

A most common issue encountered by Filipinos with their birth certificates are misspelled first, middle, or last names.  These can go from just a single misplaced letter to an entire unknown name that somehow made it to the person’s birth certificate by mistake.  If you need to have your name corrected or changed, you may do so at the city or municipality where your birth was registered.

Here is the list of requirements and fees when filing for an affidavit for clerical error and change of first name at the Quezon City Hall.  This is also otherwise known as Republic Act 9048.

Requirements for Clerical or Typographical Error:

  1. Certified true machine copy of the Certificate sought to be corrected.  Make three copies.
  2. Documents showing the correct entry/entries upon which the correction shall be based such as Baptismal Certificate, Voter’s ID, School Records, GSIS records, SSS records, medical records, business records.
  3. Other relevant documents as the Registrar may require.
  4. Filing Fee: PHP1,000 and additional service fee for Migrant Petitioner of PHP500.00.

Requirements for Change of First Name/Nickname:

  1. Certified true machine copy of the Certificate sought to be corrected.  Make three copies.
  2. Clearance from the following authorities (these are MANDATORY):
    • Clearance from Employer or Certification that the applicant has no pending case with the company (if employed).
    • Affidavit of No Employment (if the applicant is not employed).
    • NBI or PNP Clearance
    • Documents showing the correct entry/entries upon which the correction shall be based, such as: Baptismal Certificate, Voter’s ID, School records, GSIS records, SSS records, medical records, business records.
    • Other relevant documents as the Registrar may require.
  3. Filing fee: PHP3,000.00 and additional service fee for Migrant Petitioner of PHP1,000.00.

Applicants must proceed to the Civil Registry Department for further instructions.

Source:

http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-services/requirements-a-procedures/261-civilregguide

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09-27

We receive a lot of inquiries about the annotation of marriage certificates after the annulment has been handed down by the court.  Most couples think that the moment they receive the finality of the annulment, they are free to get married anytime.  They would soon realize that the process of annotating the marriage certificate and the CENOMAR of annulled couples take longer than most of us think.

So we conducted some research on this subject to find out what happens after the court has declared a marriage null and void.  How long do the parties need to wait before they can re-marry?

Find out here:

  1. Once the decision of nullity of marriage is received, the opponent/adverse counsel is given fifteen (15) days to file an appeal.  The fifteen (15) days is counted from the time the Decision is received by the Office of the Solicitor General.
  2. If no appeal is received, the Clerk of Court will issue a Certificate of Finality within three months from the date the decision was received by the Solicitor General.
  3. The Certificate of Finality and the Certified True Copies of the Decision of Nullity shall be forwarded to the Local Civil Registrar.  The LCR will issue an endorsement to the Philippine Statistics Authority or PSA (formerly NSO).
  4. The parties may request for the first annotated copies of their Marriage Certificate and CENOMAR from the PSA after one to two months from the time the papers were endorsed.

That is the reason why when you request for a copy of your MC or CENOMAR a few days or weeks after your annulment has been granted, you receive the old copy without any markings that your previous marriage has been annulled already.  Also, clarify with your lawyer if their services already include the facilitation of the annulment documents with the LCR.  Some firms do not include this in their services and the client is left wondering why their annulment papers never reached the LCR or the PSA.

Source: http://bit.ly/2dfiKXv

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Registered Twice

While some parents fail to properly register their newborn babies at the Local Civil Registry office, therefore resulting to Late Registration when the need for the child’s birth certificate arises, others do it not once, but twice (I hope not more than that!).  The following are just some of the reasons why this happens:

  • I wanted to change my child’s name;
  • I wanted to remove the name of my ex-husband from my child’s birth certificate;
  • My parents-in-law interfered with the child’s birth registration; and
  • We got a Negative Certification from the NSO so we went ahead and registered our child again (thinking that that is the only solution). 

At the end of the day, an individual whose birth has been registered twice will still have the same question: So which of the two birth certificates should I use?

Resty Mendoza got the shock of his life when, upon receiving his birth certificate, he saw that his name and birth place were different from what he has been using and declaring all his life!  He knew his real name was Restituto Alain Mendoza and that he was born in Camarines Sur (where he now resides).  The birth certificate he received from the mail says that his name is Ferdinand Alain Mendoza and that he was born in Pasay City.  All the rest of the information were correct: his parents’ names and birth places and his birthday.  All except his name and birthplace.

When he showed his parents the copy of the birth certificate he received, they confirmed that they had indeed registered his birth in Pasay City, a few weeks after he was born.  When the family moved to Camarines Sur, they requested for a copy of his birth certificate at the NSO in the area and were advised that the NSO did not have a copy of his birth certificate.  Instead of checking with the Pasay LCR, his parents filed a late registration of his birth certificate and took the opportunity to change his name and his place of birth.  They realized now that the LCR in Pasay may have endorsed a copy of his birth registration after all and now the PSA (formerly NSO) has the first copy of his birth certificate.

Resty will be graduating from college soon and the school required him to submit a copy of his PSA birth certificates (formerly NSO birth certificate).  Which birth certificate must he use now?

This time, Resty and his parents consulted the LCR in Camarines Sur and they were advised that the entries in his first birth registration are considered as his true and official birth details – especially his name and birthplace.  Since he is graduating, he will have to advise his school that his real name is Ferdinand and that to avoid confusion on his future transactions, his school records and diploma should now bear Ferdinand as his first name.

To avoid further expenses and delays in completing his school requirements, Resty agreed to use the details in his PSA birth certificate.  Although it will take a long time before he starts responding to the name “Ferdinand”, he knows that it is the best thing to do at that point.

His friends and families continued calling him “Resty” as his nickname.  And he has not failed to explain to new acquaintances how his nickname was coined when his real name is actually Ferdinand.  By doing this, he is also able to warn people of the hassles of registering a child’s birth twice.

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No Birth Record

What if your request for a copy of your NSO Birth Certificate (now PSA Birth Certificate) yields a “negative certification” instead of the actual birth certificate?  Is it possible to “not have a birth certificate”?  If yes, how do you get one when you’re already almost 60 years old?

Mila is a 58-year-old public school teacher who made it through different jobs and employers, here and abroad, without a birth certificate.  She said that the system for securing passports in the late 1980s was not yet as strict – something that worked to her favor because she was able to send all three kids to school by working as a domestic helper in Hong Kong.

Her parents failed to register her birth.  She is not even sure if she is a legitimate child as she has not seen any wedding photos of her parents, or any document that would prove that they were married.

Now that she is set to retire in less than two years, she is compelled to work at getting herself a birth certificate.  It is a basic requirement in claiming her pension and other benefits after she retires from work.

Mila is just one of the many Filipinos who do not have certified copies of their birth certificates.  Here is what one needs to do in order to properly register their birth and secure a copy of their birth certificate in PSA Security Paper.

  1. When you receive a Negative Certification from the Philippine Statistics Authority of PSA (formerly National Statistics Office or NSO) instead of receiving a copy of your certified birth certificate, proceed to the Local Civil Registry (LCR) office where your birth was registered and check if they have a record of your birth.
  2. If they do, request that it be endorsed to the PSA.  The LCR will advise you of the time it will take before a copy of your birth certificate is made available.  You may follow-up at a PSA office or at the LCR where you filed the request for endorsement.
  3. When a copy of your birth certificate is available, you need to claim this at the PSA East Avenue office.  Your succeeding requests for copies of your certified birth certificate may then be made online at psahelpline.ph or by calling the hotline (02) 737-1111.
  4. In case you do not have a copy of your birth certificate at the LCR office where you were supposedly registered, you need to file for Late Registration.  You may inquire about the process at the LCR office as well.

We have a summary of solutions to the most common PSA birth certificate problems!  Read our blog, Common PSA Birth Certificate Problems (and their solutions!).

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/negative-result-or-no-record-nso

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I Know My Name Is Pedro

What if the first name you have been using all your life is not the name written on your NSO Birth Certificate (now PSA Birth Certificate)?  )?  Is it possible to have such errors corrected?  Let’s find out from “Pedro”.

His family and friends have always called him Pedro, “Pete” for short.  In a sea of long, convoluted combinations and spellings of kids’ names that seem to have become a norm in the ‘90s, his was straightforward, easy to recall, and even patriotic.  He was really proud of his name and at a very young age, he has decided to make his first son a Pedro Junior.  He was that proud.

One very unexpected day, Pedro’s teacher called him aside and showed him a piece of paper.  The teacher said that the paper is Pedro’s PSA Birth Certificate except that Pedro could not find his first name on it!  All the other details were correct: his birth date, birth place, the names of his parents, except for that one tiny detail which happens to be his first name.

On the Birth Certificate, his name is Peter.  English for Pedro.  It was like a really bad joke.

If you were in Pedro / Peter’s place, what would you do?  Pedro / Peter found the need to do this because all his school records bear the name Pedro, instead of Peter.  Even his school I.D. shows his name as Pedro.

So how exactly do you get to correct your first name on your birth certificate?

First, you need to file a petition to change your first name in accordance with the provisions in R.A. 9048.  This includes corrections for errors like Ma. to Maria.

a). The following may file for the said petition:

  • Owner of the record
  • Owner’s spouse
  • Children
  • Parents
  • Siblings
  • Grandparents
  • Guardian
  • Other person duly authorized by law or by the owner of the document sought to be corrected;
  • If the owner of the record is a minor or physically or mentally incapacitated, petition may be filed by his spouse, or any of his children, parents, siblings, grandparents, guardians, or persons duly authorized by law.

b). If the owner was born in the Philippines, the petition shall be filed with the Local Civil Registry (LCR) Office of the city or municipality where the birth is registered.  In case he has transferred to a different province far from where his birth was registered, he can have it processed at the LCR where he is currently residing.  Those registered abroad need to have the petition filed with the Philippine Consulate of the country where his birth was reported.

c). Petitioner must present the following documents:

  • Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  • Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook;
  • Notice / Certificate of posting;
  • Payment of Three Thousand Pesos (P3,000) as filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of $150 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  • Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar;
  • NBO / Police Clearance, civil registry records or ascendants and other clearances as may be required by the concerned civil registry office;
  • Proof of publication.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/first-name-used-different-first-name-entered-birth

No First or Last Name in NSO Birth Certificate

What could be more disappointing than finding out that you do not have a first name or last name written on your NSO Birth Certificate (now PSA Birth Certificate)?

It could be that your parents were overwhelmed with joy when they first saw you that they failed to tell the nurses your name.  Or maybe they haven’t decided on a name yet and thought that they’d just have yours registered later on.  The clerk may have missed it.  Or the nurse.

There are a whole bunch of reasons why a PSA Birth Certificate would show a blank space where a first or last name should be.  But take heart; this can be corrected so that your name would clearly reflect on your Birth Certificate.

Here’s how:

a. You need to file a supplemental report to supply the missing entry.

b. Any of the following may file the said report:

  • Owner of the record
  • Owner’s spouse
  • Children
  • Parents
  • Brothers and Sisters
  • Grandparents
  • Guardian
  • Other person duly authorized by law or by the owner of the document sought to be corrected;
  • If the owner is a minor, physically or mentally incapacitated, the petition may be filed by his spouse, or any of his children, parents, brothers, sisters, grandparents, guardians, or persons duly authorized by law.

c. If the owner of the birth certificate was born in the Philippines, the reports must be filed with the Local Civil Registry (LCR) Office of the city or municipality where the birth is registered.  Otherwise, the report must be filed with the Philippine Consulate of the country where the birth was reported.  In case the owner (who was born abroad) is already in the Philippines, supporting documents for supplemental reports shall be coursed through the Department of Foreign Affairs, Office of Consular Affairs.

d. In support of your claim, you need to execute a notarized affidavit to explain why the name (first or last) was not supplied when the birth was registered.  Be prepared to submit other documents that may be required by the Local Civil Registry.

After your petition has been filed and accepted, you will be informed of the possible timeline when the changes may already be visible on your PSA Birth Certificate.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/no-first-name

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