Tag Archive: passport


06 - 20 (1)

After getting married, the next thing the couple needs to attend to are the updating of their IDs and other public documents, from their old civil status to that of married.  For women, they also have the option to change their maiden last name and begin using their husband’s last name in their IDs and government documents.  Take note that changing the woman’s last name is not mandatory; women have the option to keep their maiden last name for as long as they want.

To help newlyweds get started on this rather daunting task, we are sharing the following information, requirements, and processes involved in updating your marital status and changing your last name:

I. PHILHEALTH

  1. Bring a photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate and the original for verification.
  2. Advise the customer service personnel that you wish to change your marital status; you should be given a blank Membership Form.
  3. Your marital status should be accomplished while you wait; you will also be issued a new Philhealth ID.
  4. This can be done at any Philhealth office or satellite office.
  5. Updating of status and changing of name is free of charge.

II. Bank Records

  1. Bring a copy of your PSA Marriage Certificate; bank personnel normally photocopy the documents within bank premises.
  2. Bring valid IDs.  Banks like BDO and Eastwest prefer IDs that already bear your married name.
  3. Advise bank teller that you want to update your marital status and change your last name.  Most banks do not charge any fees for such updates.

III. Pag-IBIG

  1. Bring the original and photocopies of your PSA Marriage Certificate and valid IDs.
  2. Advise frontline personnel that you wish to update your marital status and last name.  You will be given an MCIF (Members Change of Information Form) for you to fill out.
  3. This can be done at any Pag-IBIG branch office near you.
  4. Updating your information is free of charge but if you wish to get a Loyalty Card, prepare Php 100.00.
  5. Updating of member’s information can be accomplished while you wait.

IV. SSS

  1. If you are employed, advise your employer that you wish to update your SSS data.  You will be given a Member’s Data Amendment Form (E4).  Fill it out and submit to your HR.
  2. Attach a photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate, SSS, ID, and an authorization letter for your employer to process this on your behalf.
  3. Updating your SSS details is free of charge but requesting for a new ID (UMID) will cost you Php 300.00.  The new ID may take a two to three months before it is issued to you.

V. Passport

  1. Confirmed appointment date and time; you may secure an appointment online at www.dfa.gov.ph
  2. Download a copy of the form online, accomplish it in your handwriting, but do not sign until you are in front of a DFA personnel.
  3. Get a complete list of required documents and IDs from the DFA website; double-check that you have all requirements on the day of your appointment.

VI. Driver’s License

  1. Bring the original and photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate and your current or expired license.
  2. Submit a duly accomplished Application for Driver’s License.
  3. This may be done at any LTO branch and should be accomplished within the day.  Be at the office early.

Sources:

www.lto.gov.ph

www.dfa.gov.ph

www.sss.gov.ph

www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

www.philhealth.gov.ph

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06 - 01

To avoid delays when going through pre-flight boarding procedures for your domestic flights, make sure you have ANY of the following identifications on hand.  Note that airport and airline personnel may request for additional IDs as they deem necessary and so it is best that you have more than one government-issued ID with you when travelling.

  1. Passport (Philippine and Foreign Issued)
  2. Driver’s License
  3. Philippine Regulation Commission ID
  4. SSS ID
  5. GSIS E-card
  6. Voter’s ID
  7. Integrated Bar of the Philippines ID
  8. Seaman’s Book
  9. Government Office ID
  10. ACR / ICR
  11. Company ID
  12. Unified Multi-purpose ID
  13. NBI Clearance
  14. Police Clearance
  15. Senior Citizen ID
  16. Postal ID
  17. TIN Card
  18. Barangay Certification
  19. Health Insurance Card ng Bayan
  20. OWWA ID
  21. OFW ID
  22. National Council of Disability Affairs ID
  23. DSWD Certification
  24. School ID with Principal’s signature

Sources:

www.philippineairlines.com

http://www.philippines-travel-guide.com

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05 - 29

The Philippines is the bastion of Christianity in Asia with over 93% of our population listed as Christians; we ranked 5th worldwide according to a 2011 report of the Philippine Daily Inquirer.  Filipinos take religiosity pretty seriously.  To us, it is not just some form of affiliation or membership, it is a legacy passed on to us, an identity we must protect and preserve at all costs.

And so it IS a big deal to have to find out that your religion, as written in your birth certificate, is anything but Catholic or Christian. 

Such was the case of Arabah Joy Quinto, a Roman Catholic by birth.  After receiving an Exchange Scholar grant from her high school, she immediately applied for a passport at the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA).  She thought she had all the needed documents prepared until she was required to submit a certificate from the Office of Muslim Affairs (OMA)!  Apparently, her birth certificate shows that her parents are Muslims.  She insisted that her entire family has always been devout Roman Catholics, all of them baptized by the Catholic Church as supported by their birth certificates.  The DFA would have none of it; either she presents the required OMA or have the entries in her birth certificate corrected.

How to Correct a ‘Wrong Religion’?

There are two ways of rectifying incorrect entries in a birth certificate:

  1. Under RA No. 9048 or Clerical Error Law (as amended by RA 10172) if the matter involved correcting typographical errors in the First Name, Place of Birth, Day and month of Birth , or Gender.
  2. Through a petition in court if the correction is not covered by any of the above cases.

Correcting the entries in ‘Religion’ is not included in the errors covered by RA 9048 or 10172.

In this case, Arabah Joy needs to file a petition for Correction of Entry in the Regional Trial Court of the place where her birth was registered.  Once filed, the court shall set the case for a hearing, followed by publication of the correction in a local newspaper.

As soon as the petition is granted, the LCR of Arabah’s birth place will receive a certified copy of the court’s decision.  The LCR will be directed to apply the necessary annotations on Arabah’s birth certificate, so that the same shall now reflect her parents’ correct religion.

The first corrected copy of Arabah’s birth certificate may be requested from a PSA office while succeeding copies may be ordered online at www.psahelpline.ph

If you have questions about civil registration in the Philippines, please feel free to drop usa  line and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Sources:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.gov.ph (The Family Code of the Philippines)

www.manilatimes.net

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04 - 06 (1)

When a person changes his name, whether due to marriage, adoption, or corrections on birth certificate entries, the rest of his identification documents, such as passports, should also be updated.  Here is a list of name amendments allowed by Philippine laws and the specific requirements when applying for a new or renewed passport due to change in name.

  1. Change of name due to marriage.
  2. Change of surname of a legitimated child by virtue of a subsequent marriage of parents.
  3. Change of name due to adoption.
  4. Change of name due to death of spouse or annulment of marriage.
  5. Change of name due to divorce (valid only for those Filipinos who did not act as Plaintiff in the divorce proceedings, i.e. the Filipino spouse did not initiate the divorce proceedings; not valid for couples who were both Filipinos at the time of the marriage).
  6. Change of name as duly ordered by Philippine courts or the Civil Registrar General.

General Requirements

  1. Duly accomplished passport application form, typed or printed legibly in black or blue ink.
  2. Latest original passport and one photocopy of data page of passport (original will be returned).
  3. Proof that applicant has not applied for foreign citizenship, e.g. resident alien card.

Requirements for Change of Name DUE TO MARRIAGE:

  1. If marriage was solemnized in the Philippines, bring your PSA certified original copy and one photocopy or marriage certificate.  The original copy is for verification only and will be returned to the applicant. Applicant may order a copy of the PSA Marriage Certificate online at www.psahelpline.ph.  Copies will be delivered to their address.
  2. Original and one photocopy of marriage certificate The original copy is for verification only and will be returned to the applicant. Applicant may order a copy of the PSA Marriage Certificate online at www.psahelpline.ph.  Copies will be delivered to their address.
  3. If marriage was solemnized abroad, bring a duly accomplished Report of Marriage Contracted Abroad form.

Requirements for Change of Name DUE TO DEATH OF HUSBAND, DIVORCE, ANNULLED MARRIAGES:

  1. For widowed applicants, authenticated death certificate of husband, authenticated court order of presumptive death.
  2. If marriage was annulled, PSA Marriage Certificate, with annotation reflecting the annulment of marriage.  Applicant may have a copy delivered by ordering online at www.psahelpline.ph.
  3. If applicant is divorced, submit an original and one photocopy of Divorce Decree (original will be returned).
  4. Number 3 is applicable only when the applicant is the Filipino spouse; if both parties were Filipino citizens at the time of marriage, this will not apply.

Requirement for change of name DUE TO LEGITIMATION UPON SUBSEQUENT MARRIAGE OF PARENTS (or as ordered by Philippine courts or by the Civil Registrar General):

Requirement for change of name DUE TO ADOPTION:

Changes in name allowed under Republic Act 9048:

These are changes in name entries that did not have to undergo a judicial order:

  • Correction of clerical or typographical errors in any entry in civil registry documents, except corrections involving the change in sex, age, nationality, and civil status of a person.
  • Change of a person’s first name in his/her civil registry document under certain grounds specified under the law through administrative process.

Requirement:

Source:

www.gov.ph

www.dfa.gov.ph

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03 - 21

Last year, we featured the announcement on vacationing OFWs’ exemption from filing an OEC if they are returning to the same employers abroad.  This took effect on the first week of September of the same year.  Included in the privilege is the OFW’s exemption from paying travel taxes and terminal fees when exiting the country as covered by Section 35 of RA 8042 (Migrant Workers and Overseas Filipino Act).

There are rampant cases, however, where these fees are incorporated in the cost of the airline ticket bought by OFWs online or over the counter.  And in order for them to “refund” the paid fees, they have to line up at the airport.  Most OFWs are not aware of this or do not have the luxury of time to wait in line for their reimbursement.

Good news!

Starting April 30, 2017, the P550 terminal fee will automatically be waived for OFWs purchasing tickets over the counter; the same will be extended to online ticket purchases by the end of July 2017.  This means that departing OFWs no longer need to go through the process of “refunding” terminal fees that are supposedly incorporated in the price of the tickets they purchased!

Not just for OFWs

The exemption is extended to other Pinoy travelers such as pilgrims, Philippine Sports Commission (PSC) delegates, and other Filipinos authorized by law and the Office of the President to travel outside the Philippines.

Meanwhile, the Overseas Workers’ Welfare Administration is appealing to have the unreturned fees (those not refunded by OFWs) accounted for and returned to the OWWA who stands as Trustee of OFWs.

Share this news with your OFW friends and relatives!

Source:

http://www.rappler.com/nation/164286-ofws-automatic-exemption-airport-terminal-fee-april-july

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02-24

A primary requirement when applying for a passport (or renewing an old one) is the applicant’s birth certificate in Security Paper (SECPA) issued by the Philippine Statistics Authority (formerly NSO) or a Certified True Copy issued by the Local Civil Registrar.  This has become an issue among senior citizens, especially those born on 1945 and earlier years.  Most, if not all, could not secure copies of their birth certificates as these were believed to have been destroyed during and after World War 2.

So how does a Senior Citizen acquire a passport if he could not produce a copy of his birth certificate?  The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) published a special set of requirements specifically for senior citizens born on or after 1950 and those born before 1950.  Read on!

A. First Time Passport Application and born in or after January 1, 1950

  • Personal appearance of senior citizen applicant.
  • Duly accomplished application form – may be downloaded from the DFA website.
  • Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity.
  • For birth record documents (in place of the PSA Birth Certificate):
    • Apply for the delayed registration of birth at the local civil registry office located at the place of birth of applicant.
    • Submit authenticated Birth Certificate from PSA and supporting public documents with correct date and place of birth (i.e. Form 137, Voter’s Registration Record, Baptismal Certificate with readable dry seal or National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) with photo and readable dry seal for Muslim applicants).

B. First Time Passport Application and born before 1950 (December 31, 1949 and earlier):

  • Personal appearance of senior citizen applicant.
  • Duly accomplished application form – may be downloaded from the DFA website.
  • Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity.
  • For birth record documents (in place of the PSA Birth Certificate):
    • Certificate of Non-availability of Record from the PSA.
    • Notarized Joint Birth Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons.
    • Any public document/s with correct full name, date and place of birth (i.e. Baptismal Certificate with readable dry seal or NCMF Certificate with photo and readable dry seal for Muslim applicants).

Senior Citizen passport applicants do not need to secure an appointment online.  They will be accommodated anytime at any DFA branch office.

Share this to families and friends!

Source: http://dfa.gov.ph/renewal-of-passport-requirements

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02-23

My Mom misplaced her Senior Citizen ID a few months ago.  She has yet to make that trip to the Quezon City hall to secure a new one and until then, she would shrug her shoulders every time she foregoes an opportunity to get a discount on her purchase.

Last month, she lined up at a bus terminal to buy a ticket for a one-way trip to La Union.  I heard her mention to the cashier that she is a Senior Citizen and that she doesn’t have her ID in her possession and for the cashier to please give her the discounted ticket price.  The cashier looked quizzically at her and said that without my Mom’s SC ID, she cannot grant her the discount.  My Mom dyes her hair a subtle shade of mahogany brown and would never leave the house without make up on.  She is 71 years old but people would always mistake her for someone who is in her mid-50s.  My Mom probably caught the cashier’s doubtful look because she immediately pulled her passport out of her bag and showed it to the ticket lady. However, without even uttering a word (or taking a glance at my Mom’s passport), the cashier punched the numbers on the ticket and handed it to my Mom.  I did not need to look at the ticket; I knew right away that she did not grant my Mom her discount.

Is the Senior Citizen ID the only required document before a Senior Citizen is granted his government-mandated discounts?

The Expanded Senior Citizen Act of 2010 (RA 9994) states that senior citizens may avail of benefits and privileges under the Act upon presenting a valid and original Senior Citizen’s ID as proof of his or her eligibility.

But does it end there?

My mom volunteered to present her passport, a document bearing her photograph, her address, and her birth date.  That should have been enough to prove that she is a senior citizen and she should be granted senior citizen discounts.

A careful review of the Implementing Rules and Regulations of RA 9994, particularly Article 5.5, will lead you to realize that there are indeed ALTERNATIVE IDs that senior citizens may present, in the absence of their SC IDs, if only to prove that they are qualified to avail of SC benefits and privileges.

Article 5.5 defines these alternative IDs as any document or proof of being a senior citizen which may be used to avail of benefits and privileges under the Act and its Rules.  It shall be any of the following:

  1. Senior Citizens’ ID card issued by the OSCA in the municipality where the elderly resides;
  2. The Philippine passport of the elderly person or senior citizen concerned; and
  3. Government-issued ID which reflects on its face the name, picture, date of birth and nationality of the senior citizen which includes any of the following:
    • Digitized Social Security System ID
    • Government Service Insurance System ID
    • Professional Regulation Commission ID
    • Integrated Bar of the Philippines ID
    • Unified Multi-purpose ID (UMID)
    • Driver’s License

Had I known these facts that day we were lined up at the ticket booth, I would have stepped up and demanded that my Mom be given her rightful privilege as a Filipino Senior Citizen.

Nonetheless, we took time off from work one Thursday morning and accompanied our 71-year-old mother to the Office of Senior Citizen Affairs at the QC Hall.  She was issued a shiny new ID that she now proudly flashes whenever she is asked, “Senior na po kayo?”

Source:

www.bir.gov.ph

http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/new-acceptable-ids-to-avail-yourself-of-senior-citizen-privileges/

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02-20

While we anticipate the approval of the proposed 10-year validity of Philippine passports, we should continue to mark our calendars as to when we should be applying for a passport renewal.  Currently, Philippine passports have a 5-year validity period and most passengers who have less than a year before their passports expire are no longer permitted to leave the country.

This is a dilemma encountered by most OFWs.

So what happens if your passport expires while you are overseas?

Read on:

1.Allow a one year renewal period.

Avoid waiting until you only have a few weeks left before your passport expires.  The process of renewing your passport from abroad takes at least 8 to 12 weeks.

2. Visit the Philippine Embassy / Consulate General in the country where you are currently located.

a. Bring your passport and other pertinent documents related to your travel or stay.

b. The Philippine Embassy will send your renewal application to the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) office in Manila.

c. Check online if the Philippine Embassy in your area requires applicants to set up an appointment.  Most Philippine Embassies accommodate walk-in applications for passport renewal.

d. All details such as photographs, fingerprints, and signatures will be taken on-site.

3. What are the documents you need to bring?

a. Duly accomplished passport application form, typed or printed legibly on black or blue ink.

b. Latest passport.

c. One (1) photocopy of each of the data page/s of the passport.

d. Photocopy of any valid identification card where the middle name is fully spelled out, such as state4 ID, driver’s license, Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate, or Baptismal Certificate.

e. Proof that applicant has not applied for foreign citizenship, e.g. resident alien card (green card).

These requirements may vary depending on the host country of the Philippine Embassy you will be applying to.

4. But how about if the passport IS already expired?

If your passport got lost or is already expired and you need to travel back to the Philippines, you have to secure a Travel Document from the Philippine Embassy in your host country.

What is a Travel Document?

  • Travel documents are issued to Philippine nationals returning to the Philippines, who for one reason or another, have lost their passport or cannot be issued a regular passport.
  • It is also issued to Filipino citizens who are being sent back to the Philippines.
  • It is valid for a non-extendable period of thirty (30) days from date of issuance and only for a one-way direct travel to the Philippines.  It cannot be used for re-entry to the host country.

The travel Document can only be issued when:

  • The consular officer determines that its use is warranted by emergency/critical circumstances.
  • It cannot be used as a short cut in complying with the requirements for the renewal of a passport or the replacement of a lost passport.

Renewing your Philippine passport abroad may be the last thing you would want to do while on a trip, whether as a tourist or an overseas worker.  You can avoid this by simply making sure that your passport is kept up-to-date.  Until the law on the 10-year validity period for Philippine Passports has been ratified, we all need to exert a little more effort in making sure that our passports are updated and are not expiring anytime soon.

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/2013-04-04-07-00-36

http://bangkokpe.dfa.gov.ph/consular-office/services/passport/travel-document

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/philippines-dc/consular-services-dc/faq-dc/

http://www.pinoyhood.com/renew-passport-abroad/

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02-14

In June 2016, we shared the news on the government’s proposal to extend Passport and Driver’s License validity from 5 years and 3 years respectively, to 10 years for both.  Fast forward to eight months from the time the news broke out, the House of Representatives have submitted their approval to extend the lifespan of Philippine passports to 10 years!

The amendment of House Bill 4767, Section 10 of the RA 8239 (Philippine Passport Act of 1996) will positively impact OFWs, seafarers, and business people who travel often.  The government aims to help Pinoys save on time, effort, and money by extending passport validity to 10 years; this has also been the public’s clamor for a while now since the U.S. Embassy now grants 10-year multiple entry visas to Filipino applicants.

The bill has been transmitted to the Senate and will undergo three readings before the final decision is handed down.  The entire country awaits the approval and enactment of this proposition.

Tell us what you think about this latest update on Passport Validity.

Source:

http://www.rappler.com/nation/161366-house-approves-bill-extending-passport-validity-10-years?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=referral

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02-09

After you have successfully satisfied all the ID and documentary requirements to obtain a new passport or have your old one renewed, you will be issued a receipt by the DFA cashier.  If you opted not to have your passport delivered to you, you will have to go back to that DFA branch to claim your passport.  The date of release is stamped on the receipt; you may come back on or after the date stated on your receipt – but not later than six months.

What happens if I fail to claim my passport after six months?

Based on DFA regulations, all unclaimed passports at the DFA main office, Philippine Overseas Employment Agency (POEA) Passport Extension Office, Regional Consular Offices (RCOs) nationwide will be considered inactive and will be disposed of after six months.

Do I need to apply for a new one again and pay the same fees?

Yes.  You need to secure an appointment online in order to be accommodated for your new passport application.  Apart from all the required IDs and documents, you also need to secure an Unclaimed List from the DFA Records Division.  This must be attached to your application documents and submitted to the DFA.

Pay the corresponding fee at the cashier and wait for your receipt.  Make sure that the release date is clearly stamped on the slip.

  • PHP 950.00 for regular processing (15 working days).
  • PHP 1,200 for rush processing (7 working days).
  • Additional PHP 150.00 if you opt to have the passport delivered to you.

What if I lose my receipt?

You need to draft a signed explanation letter to detail the reasons why you lost your receipt.  This must be presented at the releasing section on or after the release date.

Can I ask a relative or a friend to claim my passport on my behalf?

No, you have to personally appear at the DFA branch when claiming your passport.

Source:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph

http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/210509/news/nation/dfa-reminds-applicants-claim-passports-within-6-months

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