Category: NSO Birth Certificates and more


08 - 22

Last week, I shared how I was able to order for my entire family’s birth and marriage certificates online through PSAHelpline.ph.  Like I mentioned, we are in the process of completing our documents for our upcoming trip to Japan, and while the rest of the family prepares excitedly for the trip, some of us were tasked to do the legwork like getting everyone’s copies of their PSA birth and marriage certificates.  Good thing I knew there was a website I could run to for help.  PSAHelpline saved me a leave credit, probably a half tank of gas, and lots and lots of time.

Today I’m going to tell you about how we paid for the documents we ordered.  Our relatives were delighted to see that PSAHelpline offers various convenient payment options, especially for bulk orders like ours.

So how does one pay for PSA documents ordered online?  Here are your options:

A. Online Payments

Visa or Mastercard Credit Cards

This is the most convenient means to complete your order online.  Just click the Pay via Credit Card button on the center of the page and a pop-up window will appear.  You have 15 minutes to complete the online form before the page expires – for security purposes.

B. Over-the-counter Payments

  1. 7-11 ECPay

At 7-11, you need to key-in your payment details in a Cliqq machine – a touch screen, ATM-like machine located inside 7-11 stores where you tap in important information such as your order’s reference numbers, your contact number, and the amount you need to pay.  The machine will print out a slip, take this and hand it to the cashier who then takes your payment and issues you a receipt.

  1. Bayad Center

There are tons of Bayad Center outlets all over the country so you’re sure to find one near your home or office.  Paying for your PSA documents at a Bayad Center is like paying for your monthly utility bills: just fill out a transaction form and hand this to the cashier along with the cash.

C. Bank Payments

  1. Security Bank

I think Security Bank is one of PSAHelpline’s newest payment partners.  If you are not familiar with Security Bank locations, simply click on the Open Branch Locator button on the right side of the payment page to locate the branch nearest to your place.

  1. Metrobank

When you click on the Metrobank tab, you will be given complete instructions on how to pay for your PSA certificate order at any Metrobank branch.  You even have the option to print the payment instructions, especially if you’re sending someone else to do the errand for you.

  1. Bancnet ATMs

I used to pay for my utility bills via a Bancnet ATM so I know how convenient this payment option is.  Just go to any Bancnet ATM (preferably one that does not have a long line waiting by the sidewalk), pop in your card and key-in your PIN like you would every payday.  Instead of choosing “withdraw”, choose Payment Option, and then follow the rest of the instructions until you’ve successfully authorized the payment.  Wait for the machine to print out the thermal paper that will serve as your proof of payment.

Since we were paying for 19 documents, we decided to simply use my aunt’s credit card so we would not have to leave home (it was a lazy Sunday afternoon).  A day later, five more cousins requested for copies of their PSA birth certificates; this time, we paid at the 7-11 branch across the street from my office building.  So convenient!

Before the end of that week, we received our orders and on the same day, submitted all these to our travel agent.  Today, exactly 8 days from when we began working on our documents, we got our visas from the Japanese embassy!

If you have questions about how to order PSA certificates online, send us a message and we will do our best to find the best answers for you.

Arigato gozaimasu!

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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08 - 17

Our family will be traveling to Japan later this year and we are currently in the process of completing all our documentary requirements for our visa application.  I was tasked to take care of everyone’s copies of PSA birth and marriage certificates, and make sure these are ready for submission by the end of the month.

Back in the ‘90s, this would have been a herculean task – traveling all the way to an NSO branch (PSA used to be called NSO), lining up for my turn, and waiting until they are able to release my requested documents.  With the 15 names and 4 marriages in my list that needed PSA certificates, it would have taken me the whole day to get the errand done.  I would have had to take a leave from work and spend extra on gas, parking, and food.

Good thing I can do all these online now, through PSAHelpline.ph.  The moment I got my assignment from my Tita during our Sunday family lunch, I immediately borrowed by cousin’s laptop and began submitting my orders online.  The process is really easy and simple:

  1. Log on to www.psahelpline.ph and click on the type of certificate you need (in my case, 15 birth certificates and 4 marriage certificates).  Take note that you will be placing one order for each person’s certificate (I had to be patient, but only for 30 minutes, not an entire day!).
  2. Choose the reason for ordering the certificate.  I chose the first one: Passport/Travel; I also had to select the country we were traveling to.
  3. You will be taken to a page where you’ll have to type the certificate owner’s information.  If you are applying for a different person (other than yourself), it’s best to have their complete information handy so you don’t waste your time going back and forth, asking for their personal details.  This is why I endeavored to finish the task while the entire family was literally, “under the same roof”.
  4. After submitting all your information, you will be asked if you had any procedure done on your certificate such as: Correction of Entries, Legitimation, Adoption, Court Hearings, and Supplemental.  If you’ve never had any, just click on “None”.
  5. The next page will ask who is requesting for the document.  Anybody can request for a person’s birth certificate PROVIDED he is of legal age and has a valid ID that matches the name on the application form.  The ID will be presented to the courier upon delivery.  On the same page, you will also be asked for authorized representatives who can receive the documents on your behalf in case you are not around when the courier arrives.  Again, these representatives must have valid IDs that they can present upon documents’ delivery.  As the requesting party, you must also provide the representatives with a Letter of Authorization and one of your valid IDs.
  6. On the Checkout page, you have a chance to double check all the information you provided.  Before submitting your request, you will be asked to provide your contact information, the complete delivery address, and the number of copies you need delivered.  One copy costs P350, this already includes processing and delivery.
  7. Upon hitting the “Submit” button, you will be taken to the confirmation page.  You will then receive an email from PSAHelpline with your order number and the different modes of payments.
  8. Pay and wait for your orders to be delivered.

And now, the easier part: paying for my orders!  I was delighted to see that PSAHelpline now has various payment center partners that we could choose from.  Normally, I would simply whip out my credit card and pay online but since the transactions involved a lot of other people, I opted not to offer my card (hehe!).

Visit my blog again tomorrow for details on the different payment options of PSAHelpline.  Meantime, let me go online to shop for preloved winter clothes to prepare for our Japan trip!

Arigatou gozaimasu!

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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05 - 29

The Philippines is the bastion of Christianity in Asia with over 93% of our population listed as Christians; we ranked 5th worldwide according to a 2011 report of the Philippine Daily Inquirer.  Filipinos take religiosity pretty seriously.  To us, it is not just some form of affiliation or membership, it is a legacy passed on to us, an identity we must protect and preserve at all costs.

And so it IS a big deal to have to find out that your religion, as written in your birth certificate, is anything but Catholic or Christian. 

Such was the case of Arabah Joy Quinto, a Roman Catholic by birth.  After receiving an Exchange Scholar grant from her high school, she immediately applied for a passport at the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA).  She thought she had all the needed documents prepared until she was required to submit a certificate from the Office of Muslim Affairs (OMA)!  Apparently, her birth certificate shows that her parents are Muslims.  She insisted that her entire family has always been devout Roman Catholics, all of them baptized by the Catholic Church as supported by their birth certificates.  The DFA would have none of it; either she presents the required OMA or have the entries in her birth certificate corrected.

How to Correct a ‘Wrong Religion’?

There are two ways of rectifying incorrect entries in a birth certificate:

  1. Under RA No. 9048 or Clerical Error Law (as amended by RA 10172) if the matter involved correcting typographical errors in the First Name, Place of Birth, Day and month of Birth , or Gender.
  2. Through a petition in court if the correction is not covered by any of the above cases.

Correcting the entries in ‘Religion’ is not included in the errors covered by RA 9048 or 10172.

In this case, Arabah Joy needs to file a petition for Correction of Entry in the Regional Trial Court of the place where her birth was registered.  Once filed, the court shall set the case for a hearing, followed by publication of the correction in a local newspaper.

As soon as the petition is granted, the LCR of Arabah’s birth place will receive a certified copy of the court’s decision.  The LCR will be directed to apply the necessary annotations on Arabah’s birth certificate, so that the same shall now reflect her parents’ correct religion.

The first corrected copy of Arabah’s birth certificate may be requested from a PSA office while succeeding copies may be ordered online at www.psahelpline.ph

If you have questions about civil registration in the Philippines, please feel free to drop usa  line and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Sources:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.gov.ph (The Family Code of the Philippines)

www.manilatimes.net

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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04 - 11

Joy gave birth to her eldest daughter before she turned 17 years old.  Since she was too young to care for her infant, her parents decided to claim Joy’s daughter as their own.  The baby was named Mia and Joy’s parents were listed as the baby’s parents in her birth certificate.

Ten years later, Joy married Mia’s biological father.  A few months into their marriage, both decided that it is time they took over the parental responsibilities for their one and only child.  This includes changing Mia’s last name to the last name of her biological father.  A lawyer friend explained that in order to achieve this, they need to adopt Mia.

Why do you need to adopt your own child?

Mia’s parents could have just easily filed for her Legitimation after they got married however, since Mia’s birth certificate shows her grandparents as her parents, they now need to adopt Mia so she can be legally recognized as their child.

What is the process of adopting your own child?

  1. The husband and wife must file a joint petition for adoption of Mia, with respect to Section 7 of R.A. 8552.  This must be filed at the Family Court of the province or city where the adopting parties reside.
  2. The petition should include the couple’s application for the change of surname of Mia.  Since Mia is already 16 years old at the time of adoption, her consent on the adoption is also needed.  She should be made aware that should she agree to the adoption, her last name will change to that of her biological father’s and custody will be transferred to her biological parents.

How will this kind of adoption be treated by the Family Court?

There are three kinds of adoption in the Philippines:

  1. Agency Adoptions – a licensed adoption agency finds and develops adoptive families for children under their care.
  2. Family or Relative Adoptions – where biological parents make a direct placement of the child to a relative.
  3. Private or Independent Adoptions – either a direct placement to a family known by the child’s biological parents or through the use of an intermediary or a go-between.

Mia’s adoption falls under Family or Relative Adoptions since her grandparents stood as her biological parents.  Take note that this could pose an issue in court as the grandparents might be accused of falsifying the child’s birth documents (listing themselves as Mia’s parents), but that is a separate matter that can be tackled in a different article later on.

What will be the effect of this kind of adoption?

  1. Mia’s legal ties with her grandparents (standing as her parents) will be severed.  They shall now assume the roles of grandparents to Mia and that is something they can deal with as a family.
  2. She will now be treated as a legitimate child of her adopters (who are actually her biological parents).
  3. Mia and her biological parents now have reciprocal rights and obligations arising from the relationship of parent and child, including but not limited to:
    • The right of the adopter to choose the name the child is to be known;
    • The right of the adopter and adoptee to be legal and compulsory heirs of each other.

Joy and her husband’s petition for adoption was granted by the Family Court.  It took a while before Mia got used to her new living arrangement and still opts to spend her weekends with her grandparents.  Mia’s inheritance, as stated in her grandparents’ will, remained intact in spite of the changes in her name and legitimacy.

So yes, you can adopt your own child.  It all depends on the events surrounding your circumstances and, up to a certain degree, your lawyer’s skill in convincing the Family Court that your petition merits approval.

Reference: http://www.gov.ph/2002/07/31/rule-on-adoption/

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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11-03

When my uncle was granted citizenship in the U.S. by virtue of a petition filed by his daughter who is a natural born U. S. Citizen, he also elected to change his first name.  So from being a Jose Paulo de Guzman Asuncion, he is now Mark Arthur de Guzman Asuncion.

He recently celebrated his 65th birthday and is now taking an extended vacation in the Philippines.  He is technically “retired” from private employment in the U.S. but still has the option to continue working for smaller firms.

Last Monday, he requested me to help him order copies of his and my aunt’s birth certificates and two copies of their marriage certificate.  Of course, I ordered online at PSAHelpline.ph because I know they can get it done in 2 to 3 days max.  He told me to have it delivered to his home address in Quezon City and list him as the recipient.

I did as he requested and was able to successfully submit all orders in less than 15 minutes.  I went to a nearby 711 store to pay for the documents (yes! 711 accepts PSAHelpline.ph payments!) and told my uncle to just wait for the courier within the week.  I also reminded him to prepare his IDs as these will be asked of him before he receives the documents.

Later that evening while we were having dinner, my uncle showed me all the IDs he has in his envelope.  It was then that I realized that he no longer had any IDs that bore his old first name, Jose Paulo.  From his driver’s license, to his Senior Citizen ID, to his passport, he is identified as Mark Arthur De Guzman Asuncion.  Since he is declared as the owner of the ordered documents, and his name on his PSA birth certificate is Jose Paulo, he needs to show the courier a valid ID with his name listed as Jose Paulo.

We launched a major search operation in his old cabinets and desk drawers; I asked the helper to find any old IDs that do not have expiration dates and bear his name as Jose Paulo.  After turning his entire bedroom upside down, we finally saw one!  The last SSS ID he had before he left for the U.S. in 2002 was neatly kept in a box and still looked as good as new!  And, it does not have an expiration date!  Of course, his name on this ID is Jose Paulo De Guzman Asuncion.

When the PSAHelpline.ph courier arrived yesterday with the documents, my uncle was eagerly waiting by his porch with his SSS ID.  He handed this to the courier who carefully studied the ID and my uncle’s face.  The courier smiled and said: “Parang di po kayo tumatanda!”

So yes, you can use an old ID when receiving your ordered PSA documents, just as long as these are non-expiring IDs like your SSS.

My uncle, having stayed in the U.S. for 14 years, is used to quick, efficient, and hassle-free transactions.  And I must say that he was really impressed with the online ordering and delivery services of PSAHelpline.ph.  He could not believe how far the PSA has gone from being an overly crowded office with people lined up everywhere, to having an online portal where Pinoys can easily request for their documents and have these conveniently delivered wherever in the country.

He also loved being told that his photo on his old SSS ID looked like it was taken just yesterday.

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10-04-1

The central outlet office of the Philippine Statistics Authority (formerly NSO) in East Avenue, Quezon City has transferred to its new location in Sta. Mesa, Manila.  Their new address is Solicarel Building I and II, Ramon Magsaysay Boulevard, in Sta. Mesa near the LRT 2 Pureza Station.  You may now proceed to their new location for the issuance of civil registry documents such as Birth, Marriage, Death, and Certificate of No Marriage or CENOMAR.

The PSA also holds offices at the following locations:

  1. Pasay City – Hobbies of Asia, #8 Diosdado Macapagal Avenue
  2. Caloocan City – Caloocan City Hall, A. Mabini Street
  3. Makati City – Makati City Hall, J.P. Rizal Street, Poblacion
  4. Muntinlupa City – 2nd level, East Parking, Starmall, Alabang
  5. Pasig City – Pasig City Hall, Caruncho Avenue, Barangay San Nicolas

All PSA offices are open during weekdays (Monday to Friday) from 7:00AM to 4:00PM and on Saturdays from 8:00AM to 5:00PM.

You may also have your civil registry documents delivered to your preferred address through the PSAHelpline.ph website or by calling (02) 737 – 1111.  The documents will be delivered to you within 2 to 3 days without leaving your home or office.  Online payment options are also made available for everyone’s convenience and security.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/content/transfer-psa-central-outlet-sta-mesa

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09-27

We receive a lot of inquiries about the annotation of marriage certificates after the annulment has been handed down by the court.  Most couples think that the moment they receive the finality of the annulment, they are free to get married anytime.  They would soon realize that the process of annotating the marriage certificate and the CENOMAR of annulled couples take longer than most of us think.

So we conducted some research on this subject to find out what happens after the court has declared a marriage null and void.  How long do the parties need to wait before they can re-marry?

Find out here:

  1. Once the decision of nullity of marriage is received, the opponent/adverse counsel is given fifteen (15) days to file an appeal.  The fifteen (15) days is counted from the time the Decision is received by the Office of the Solicitor General.
  2. If no appeal is received, the Clerk of Court will issue a Certificate of Finality within three months from the date the decision was received by the Solicitor General.
  3. The Certificate of Finality and the Certified True Copies of the Decision of Nullity shall be forwarded to the Local Civil Registrar.  The LCR will issue an endorsement to the Philippine Statistics Authority or PSA (formerly NSO).
  4. The parties may request for the first annotated copies of their Marriage Certificate and CENOMAR from the PSA after one to two months from the time the papers were endorsed.

That is the reason why when you request for a copy of your MC or CENOMAR a few days or weeks after your annulment has been granted, you receive the old copy without any markings that your previous marriage has been annulled already.  Also, clarify with your lawyer if their services already include the facilitation of the annulment documents with the LCR.  Some firms do not include this in their services and the client is left wondering why their annulment papers never reached the LCR or the PSA.

Source: http://bit.ly/2dfiKXv

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08 - 31

A few months back, we featured an article on the conditions for married women to use their maiden names on their passports.  In that article, it was mentioned that a married woman needs to show proof that her marriage has been annulled or that she has been widowed before she can revert to her maiden name on her passport.

How easy (or difficult) is it really to get your maiden name back especially on major IDs like a passport or a driver’s license?  Here is a personal experience I would like to share for everyone’s information and guidance.

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My mom had her passport renewed at a DFA satellite office a few weeks back.  She was excited to have this processed as she saw it as a chance to change her name on her passport back to her maiden name.  Ever since she and my dad were granted their annulment several years ago, she had been diligently updating her IDs with her maiden name and her passport was actually foremost in her agenda.

She went to the DFA satellite office with her IDs, a copy of her original birth certificate (she was born in 1946), her annulment papers, and her old passport.  When she advised the DFA personnel that she would like to revert to her maiden name, she was requested to present a copy of her PSA birth certificate.  Since she did not have a copy ready with her, she decided to reschedule her passport renewal.

We ordered for a copy of her PSA birth certificate online through PSAHelpline.ph.  In less than 15 minutes, we were done with the entire ordering and payment process because the site accepts credit card payments!  In two days, my mom received a parcel from PSAHelpline.ph.

When she opened the package, she wasn’t entirely surprised to find a Negative Certificate instead of a copy of her birth certificate.  The PSA does not have a copy of her birth records.  We were advised by a friend who works at the Quezon City Hall to file for a late registration of our mother’s birth details that will then be forwarded to the PSA for certification.  Doing so would mean traveling all the way back to Cabanatuan City, my mom’s birth place.

Since my mom did not want to wait that long to have her passport renewed, she agreed to just use her married last name.  I advised that this may be a wise decision if she intends to apply for a tourist visa to the U.S. soon as her previous visas were issued under her married name.

When she agreed to keep her married name, all she needed to submit was a copy of her Senior Citizen ID and her old passport.  She is scheduled to pick up her new passport on September 21st, her 70th birthday.

===========================

You see ladies, getting your maiden name back is not as easy as most think.  So before giving it up, consider other possibilities.  In documents such as passports, you actually have the option to use your maiden name even if you are already married.

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Proof of Citizenship

After we graduated from college in 1998, my best friend, James, got married to his pregnant girlfriend who is a naturalized US citizen.  They got married in California and then flew back to the Philippines to settle here for good.  However, when their baby was born, his wife asked that they move back to the US so she can pursue her career in I.T.  My friend was only 20 years old then and was at the height of his career as a band singer, travelling all over the country and earning well.  He wanted to stay until his band is able to launch an album and go main stream.

His wife took their baby and left for the US anyway and left my friend behind.  But because James missed his daughter so much, he applied for a tourist visa and followed his family to Texas and spent a year trying to get used to his new environment.  That was all he needed to realize that he is not cut-out for the ‘American Dream’.  He came back to the Philippines with a broken heart.

Not long after, his wife filed for divorce and sent him the papers which he promptly signed.  She later married an American and are now happily settled in Connecticut with her and my friend’s daughter.

James, on the other hand, is also planning to marry his girlfriend of three years.  To be able to do this, he needs to file a petition for his divorce to be recognized in the Philippines.  He went to the Manila City Hall to find out how this can be done.

As the petition will be filed in court, James sought the services of a Public Attorney’s Office (PAO) lawyer to guide him in the legal proceedings of his case.  He was required to present a copy of his NSO birth certificate and that of his ex-wife’s.  Their birth certificates will support the rest of the documents they had on hand, proving his ex-wife’s citizenship at the time she secured the divorce abroad.  This is because under the Family Code, only the alien spouse has the legal capacity to seek a valid divorce abroad.  A Filipino citizen who files for divorce abroad will remain legally married to his spouse in the Philippines and will not be legally capable of marrying another person here.

In James’ and his ex-wife’s case, she was born in the Philippines but was petitioned by her parents to become a citizen of the U.S.  She acquired her American citizenship right before she and James got married.  This makes her the ‘alien spouse’ and is legally capacitated to seek divorce in America.

James ordered for copies of his and his ex-wife’s PSA birth certificates at www.psahelpline.ph.  His ex-wife had to send additional identification to the PSAHelpline (like her passport) since James will be receiving her birth certificate on her behalf.  It took less than a week for the birth certificates to be delivered and James was able to complete all required documents for submission to the city hall in less than a month.

He is now currently waiting for the results of his petition.  As soon as he receives the court’s acknowledgment of his divorce in the U.S., he would be free to marry his girlfriend here in the Philippines.

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How Often Should I Get A BC

When I had my MRP passport renewed two weeks ago, I was required to bring a copy of my PSA birth certificate.  As the one I had on file is already a bit old (with tears on the corners and some entries have faded over time), I was left with no choice but to have a new, fresh copy delivered to me instead.  I was glad to have an excuse to finally secure a new copy of my birth certificate.  I received my order from PSAHelpline.ph after two days, in time for my appointment with the DFA.

I prepared a photocopy of my birth certificate and brought the original one for verification.  When the interviewer took my documents, I was surprised to find out that they will also be keeping the original copy of my PSA birth certificate (apart from the photocopy that I prepared).  I asked the interviewer why they need to take the original copy; she said that since I am renewing an MRP passport, my renewal is considered a new application and therefore, they need to collect the original copy of my identification (the birth certificate).  I offered the old copy of my birth certificate (the frayed one) instead but she said that the DFA requires the document to be in the most recent SECPA (Security Paper).  I had no choice but to surrender the brand new copy of my birth certificate.

When I left the DFA office, I was both happy and disappointed: happy because I’ve crossed out one major item from the to-do list (get your passport renewed), disappointed because I again do not have a copy of my PSA birth certificate.

Before I placed a new order to have my PSA document delivered, I searched online if there are any differences with the old copy I got from NSO before and the new one that I submitted to the DFA.  I just wanted to understand why the DFA would not honor the NSO copy I was offering them.

I came across a press statement made by PSA, explaining that birth certificates do not have “expiration dates” (unlike Certificate of No Marriage which is only valid for six months) because the details contained in this document do not change and cannot be altered.  Even when there have been changes in the details (like correction of misspelled entries, changes in names, legitimation), these are indicated only as annotations on the original copy.

If there had been any changes on the copies (if I were to compare the old copy from NSO and new one I got recently), it would only be the color of the Security Paper and the new logo of the PSA.  According to the press statement, these changes are implemented to prevent the spread of fake PSA birth certificates.  The new features of the document do not nullify the validity of an old copy you may already have in your files.  Whichever copy you are holding, whether sealed with the logo of the former NSO or the new PSA, you can be sure that it is a valid copy of your birth certificate as long as it was acquired through an authorized PSA partner like PSAHelpline.ph.

The PSA also emphasized that they do not have control over the specific requirements of agencies and establishments that require “updated” copies of PSA birth certificates (like DFA).  There are a multitude of reasons why some offices require that we execute new copies of our documents, including birth certificates.

So that answered my question.

After this experience, I ordered two copies of my PSA birth certificate: one for my files and the other as a ready document should I be required to submit an original copy anytime soon.

I suggest you do the same so you can always be sure that you have a copy of your birth certificate on file.

The PSAHelpline.ph delivers your PSA documents in two to three days.  You may visit their website or call their hotline at 02-737-1111.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/content/press-statement-issue-civil-registry-documents-such-birth-death-and-marriage-certificates

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