Tag Archive: PSA Birth Certificate problems


2 Feb 13

Most people think that a misspelled name in a birth certificate can be easily rectified by filing a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error, as stipulated in RA 9048.  However, there are cases when misspelled names may only be corrected through a court proceeding and with the assistance of a lawyer.

Correcting vs. Changing

A typographical error, a misplaced or missing letter, or an error that causes the name to sound funny, unintelligible, and downright erroneous, can be corrected by filing a Petition for Correction.  This is done at the Local Civil Registry office of the person’s birthplace.

If the error causes the name to change, but can still be considered as a valid name, it may not be counted a typo error.  This means that you will have to seek the advice of a lawyer and the case may have to undergo a court proceeding in order for the name’s spelling to be corrected.

Example:

The child’s name is Lea but the name printed on her birth certificate is Lhea.  Both spellings can be considered as ‘correct’ but since the child’s name is Lea and not Lhea, you will essentially be requesting for the name to be ‘changed’ instead of corrected.  Changing a name in a birth certificate (whether first, middle, or last name) has to undergo court proceedings; the changes will be applied after the court has decided on the petition.

This is the reason why would-be parents need to carefully check the Certificate of Live Birth document that is usually accomplished by the hospital.  Whatever is written there will be considered as true and correct by the LCR and will then reflect in the child’s birth certificate for the rest of his life.  Correcting entries can be time-consuming and expensive; this can be avoided by diligently checking all entries in the document before submitting to the LCR and by making sure that the birth certificate owner uses the same information in his or her birth certificate in all of his IDs and transactions, for the rest of his life.  Any discrepancy between the entries in the birth certificate and his IDs and other documents could cause delays and denials in his applications and transactions.

Who Shall File the Correction or Change (of first name’s spelling):

  • Owner of the record
  • Owner’s spouse
  • Children
  • Parents
  • Siblings
  • Grandparents
  • Guardians
  • Any other person duly authorized by law or by the owner of the document sought to be corrected;
  • If the owner of the record is a minor or physically or mentally incapacitated, the petition may be filed by his spouse, or any of his children, parents, siblings, grandparents, guardians, or persons duly authorized by law.

Where to file the petition for correction:

If born in the Philippines:

  • The petition shall be filed with the local civil registry office of the city or municipality where the birth is registered.
  • When the petitioner had already migrated to another place within the Philippines and it would not be practical for such party to appear in person with the civil registrar of the place of birth, the petition may be filed with the civil registry office where he/she is currently residing.

If born abroad:

  • The petitioner may file at the Philippine Consulate where the birth was reported.

Supporting Documents:

  • Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  • Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voters’ affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  • Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  • Payment of Php 1,000 as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  • Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

We have a summary of solutions to the most common PSA birth certificate problems!  Read our blog, Common PSA Birth Certificate Problems (and their solutions!).

Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

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July 09 (1)

Any misspelled entry in your child’s birth records can and will cause him a lot of trouble in the future.  It is always best to have these corrected as soon as possible to avoid inconsistencies in your child’s records, especially when he starts going to school.

There are two types of corrections that can be done on any erroneous birth certificate: the types of corrections that can be rectified by the LCR through a petition for correction of clerical error, and the ones that need to undergo a court proceeding (in which case, you may have to hire the services of a lawyer).  If the correction is a typo error, the LCR will only require you to file a petition for correction where you only need to execute an affidavit, pay minimal fees, and wait for the LCR to release the corrected copy of the certificate.  If the case involves changing the name, or if the correction will result to a new name altogether (example: the child’s name is Michelle, but the name on the birth certificate is Richelle which is also a valid name, changing the “R” to an “M” will result to a new name), the LCR may recommend for a Change of Name (instead of a simple petition for correction) and therefore, the petitioners will have to go through the whole nine yards – filing the case, court hearings, attorney’s fees, and the like.

I found a website that can help you better understand the intricacies of correcting errors in your child’s birth certificate.  This site has helped me and a lot of my relatives address minor glitches in our civil registry records.  If you have any problems with your child’s birth records, visit www.citizenservices.com.ph  or better yet, click this link that will take you directly to their article on correcting baby’s names.

Have a productive day!

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May 15

Pinoys have yet to fully accept the values and benefits of being insured.  Whether it is a life or medical insurance, every working Filipino must be protected from the inevitable.  When unfortunate situations arise – a family member gets sick, a child meets an accident – it is best to be prepared.

If you are employed by the government or by a private firm, it is most likely that you are granted a medical insurance sponsored by your employer.  This is a good thing to have, especially if it is extended to your family.  However, this is only applicable while you are salaried by your employer.  The moment you quit your job (or it quits you!), you lose the privilege and will be left on your own to manage when you or someone in your family gets sick.

That is why it is important that you have yourself enlisted as a member of the PhilHealth, if you haven’t yet.  The PhilHealth voluntary membership is open to anyone who does not have a fixed employment, not a senior citizen, not an indigent member, or sponsored member of the PhilHealth.

Who are qualified to become voluntary PhilHealth members?

  1. OFWs – documented or undocumented Filipino workers abroad.
  2. Self-employed professionals – self-earning individuals such as entrepreneurs, lawyers, doctors, and freelancers whose income is generated from their profession or business.
  3. Informal sector workers – people working in the informal economy, including jeepney and tricycle drivers, street and market vendors, and small construction workers.
  4. Dual citizens – Filipinos who also hodl citizenship in another country.
  5. Naturalized Filipino citizens – foreigners who have become Filipino citizens through naturalization.
  6. Expats – foreign workers who live in the Philippines with valid working permits or Alien Certificate of Registration.

What documentary requirements do you need to prepare when applying?

You only need a duly accomplished PhilHealth Member Registration Form (PMRF) and submit this to the nearest Local Health Insurance Office or PhilHealth Express outlet.

You will then be issued a Member Data Record or MDR and an ID card after your application has been reviewed.  Your PhilHealth ID number will serve as your lifetime PhilHealth number and must be used as reference when you pay your contributions to the cashier.

Online application is also available!

  1. Go to the PhilHealth Electronic Registration System.
  2. Click on “Proceed”.
  3. Read the Terms and Conditions, tick the small box below, and click “Accept”.
  4. On the PhilHealth online registration form, enter the required information.
  5. Upload your document in jpeg, pdf, gif, or png format.  (optional)
  6. Enter the provided Captcha code, tick the small box below, and click “Submit Registration”.

Access your email for the instructions on how to complete the rest of your application.  Take note of your transaction number as this will serve as your reference number to your registration.

How much should be my contribution?

Members earning PHP 25,000 or below every month must pay a quarterly contribution of PHP 600 (or PHP 200 per month / PHP 2,400 per year).

Members earning over PHP 25,000 must pay PHP 900 for the quarter (or PHP 300 per month / PHP 3,600 per year).

It costs so little to become a bona fide PhilHealth member, but the assurance of knowing that you are covered by the PhilHealth when emergencies strike will far outweigh the price you think you are paying now.

Visit the nearest PhilHealth office now and have yourself signed up as a member.

Reference: http://www.philhealth.gov.ph

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May 03 - 2 (1)

Are you planning to buy a house soon?  Have you considered getting one through a Pag-IBIG housing loan?

Here are some facts and figures that could help you decide on availing a real estate property through your Pag-IBIG membership.

  • Lower interest rates for Regular Housing Loan

Effective February 14, 2018, the Pag-IBIG began offering home loan interest rates for as low as 5.67% per annum (from 5.5%) for a 1-year fixing period, and 6.37% per annum (from 6.5%) for a 3-year fixing period.  This applies to members who are willing to pay a 25% equity upfront.

Members can borrow up to P6-million, depending on their monthly salary and the loan may be payable up to 30 years.

Pag-IBIG boasts that their interest rates are at an all-time low this year (2018) and therefore, is the best time to avail of a housing loan from the agency.

  • More affordable pabahay for minimum-wage earners.

Lowest interest rate at 3% per annum.

Roughly P1,897.22 monthly amortization for the first five years of a P450,000 loan, over a 30-year repayment period).

No equity

For developer-assisted housing loans up to the prevailing maximum limit for socialized housing loan, the LTV ratio shall be 100% provided the developer’s License to Sell is for a socialized housing project and the loan purpose is for the purchase of a residential unit.

Longer loan term of up to 30 years.

Only 7 documents to apply!

  • Pag-IBIG offers Online Housing Loan Application.

You have the option to submit your application online at http://www.pagibigfund.gov.ph/HousingLoan

  • Housing Loan Programs Orientation
    • Every Saturday at 2/F JELP Business Solutions Building, 409 Shaw Blvd., Mandaluyong City
    • Every 2nd Saturday of the month at 3/F Lecture Hall B, Legislative Building, Quezon City Hall.
    • Every 3rd Saturday of the month at Rizal Provincial Capitol Multi-purpose Hall, Antipolo City

All orientation programs run from 9Am to 11AM and are given for free to all interested housing loan applicants.

For more information about Pag-IBIG housing loans, you may call their hotline at 02-724-4244 or visit their website at www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

 

Reference:  http://www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

 

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Apr 30

The Department of Education has announced the age cut-off policy for incoming Kindergarten and Grade 1 students for school year 2018-2019.  Find out if your little one is qualified to step up!

  1. Children who are five years old by June 1 of every calendar year shall be accepted in Kindergarten by both public and private schools.
  2. Learners entering Kindergarten who will turn five years old by the end of August may be considered by schools provided that they are administered with the Philippine Early Childhood Development (ECD) checklist before the school year opens.
  3. Recognizing the difference in school year opening among schools, Kindergarten learners should be five years old by July 1, with an extension period until September 30, if their schools open the school year in July; and by August 1, with an extension period until October 31, if their schools open the school year in August.
  4. Learners who completed Kindergarten in SY 2017-2018 shall be allowed to enroll in Grade 1, given that they turned five years old within SY 2017-2018.
  5. Learners who will turn five years old within SY 2018-2019 shall be accepted in Kindergarten granted that they pass the Philippine ECD checklist.
  6. Incoming Kindergarten for SY 2019-2020 must strictly comply with the cut-off age policy.

The above provisions were announced by DepEd, following the issuance of the “Amendment to DepEd Order No. 47, S. 2016” otherwise known as the “Omnibus Policy on Kindergarten Education.  These policies are applicable to both public and private schools and providing for transitory provisions to accommodate Kindergarten and Grade One enrollees for SY 2018-2019 and SY 2019-2020.

Reference: http://www.deped.gov.ph

 

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Apr 17 (2)

If you plan to apply for a Pag-IBIG housing loan soon, know that the first thing you need to do is attend a loan counseling session at designated Pag-IBIG offices.  To help you plan your trip to Pag-IBIG, here are their schedules for the said counseling session, as well as the addresses of the offices where they hold such talks:

  • Every TUESDAY and THURSDAY

3/F Training Room, Kamias MSB

#795 Anchor Center, Edsa, Quezon City

(Near GMA-Kamuning MRT Station)

  • Every SATURDAY

2/F JELP Business Solutions Building

409 Shaw Blvd., Mandaluyong City

  • Every 2ND SATURDAY OF THE MONTH

3/F Lecture Hall B, Legislative Building,

Quezon City Hall

  • Every 3RD SATURDAY OF THE MONTH

Rizal Provincial Capitol Multi-purpose Hall

Antipolo City

All orientations are scheduled to start at 9:00AM and will end at 11:00AM.  You do not need to pay anything to attend the seminar.  You just need to be at the venue or session hall on time, with a pen and paper for your notes.  You may approach any Pag-IBIG staff after the session if you have further questions.

Reference: www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

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Apr 05

An employee is entitled to a separation pay after he resigns from his job.  But why do some get more than others, even when both had the same number of years in service and are receiving almost the same monthly salaries?

Here is a summary of how a resigning employee’s separation pay is determined by the employer, as published by the National Wages and Productivity Commission.

  1. One-half Month Pay Per Year of Service

An employee is entitled to receive a separation pay equivalent to one-half month pay for every year of service, a fraction of at least six (6) months being considered as one (1) whole year, if his/her separation from the service is due to any of the following authorized causes:

  1. Retrenchment to prevent losses (i.e. reduction of personnel affected by management to prevent losses);
  2. Closure or cessation of operation of an establishment not due to serious losses or financial reverses; and
  3. When the employee is suffering from a disease not curable within a period of six (6) months and his/her continued employment is prejudicial to his/her health or to the health of his/her co-employees.
  1. One-Month Pay Per Year of Service

An employee is entitled to separation pay equivalent to his/her one-month pay for every year of service, a fraction of at least six (6) months being considered as one whole year if his/her separation from service is due to any of the following:

  1. Installation by the employer of labor-saving devices;
  2. Redundancy, as when the position of the employee has been found to be excessive or unnecessary in the operation of the enterprise; and
  3. Impossible reinstatement of the employee to his or her former position or to a substantially equivalent position for reasons not attributable to the fault of the employer, as when the reinstatement ordered by a competent authority cannot be implemented due to closure or cessation of operations of the establishment/employer, or the position to which he or she is to be reinstated no longer exists and there is no substantially equivalent position in the establishment to which he or she can be assigned.

An employee is entitled to a separation pay when his or her termination from work is due to any of the above circumstances.

An employee who voluntarily resigns from employment is not entitled to separation pay, except when it is stipulated in the employment contract or Collective Bargaining Agreement or based on established employer practice in the company.

Separation pay may also be granted to an employee under the following instances:

  1. As financial assistance as an act of social justice, even in cases of legal dismissal under Article 282 of the Labor Code of the Philippines, where the employee is validly dismissed but for causes other than serious misconduct or those involving moral turpitude;
  2. If an employee is illegally dismissed and is ordered reinstated but reinstatement is not viable because of the strained relationship between the employee and the employer;
  3. When the payment of separation pay is part of the company policy or a benefit granted under the CBA of the employer and the employee.

 

References:

www.dole.gov.ph

www.nwpc.dole.gov.ph

 

Apr 03 (2)

There are four additional grounds that the divorce bill will include in the list of reasons why a person may seek to dissolve his or her marriage.  Bear in mind that the grounds listed for legal separation and annulment remain in effect and are carried into the divorce bill.

 Below are the grounds under Article 55 of the Family Code, and Annulment under Article 55 of the same code:

  1. Physical violence or grossly abusive conduct directed against the petitioner, a common child, or a child of the petitioner.
  2. Physical violence or moral pressure to compel the petitioner to change religious or political affiliation.
  3. Final judgment sentencing the respondent to imprisonment of more than 6 years, even if pardoned.
  4. Drug addiction or habitual alcoholism or chronic gambling of the respondent.
  5. Homosexuality of the respondent.
  6. Contracting by the respondent of a subsequent bigamous marriage, whether in the Philippines or abroad.
  7. Marital infidelity or perversion or having a child with another person other than one’s spouse during the marriage, except when the spouses have agreed to have a child through in vitro or a similar procedure, or when the wife bears a child as a result of being a rape victim.
  8. Attempt against the life of the petitioner, a common child, or a child of the petitioner.
  9. Abandonment without justifiable cause for more than a year.
  10. Those legally separated by judicial decree for more than two years can also avail of divorce.
  11. One of the spouses was older than 18 but younger than 21 at the time of marriage without the consent of a parent, guardian, or substitute parental authority unless, after the age of 21, the pair freely cohabitated and lived together.
  12. Either party was of unsound mind, unless such party, after coming to reason, freely cohabitated with the other.
  13. The consent of one party was obtained through fraud unless, despite after knowing the fraud, continued to cohabit as husband and wife.
  14. That the consent of one party was obtained by force, intimidation, or undue influence unless, despite the cessation of such, the pair continued to cohabit.
  15. That either party was incapable of consummating the marriage with the other, and the incapacity continues or appears to be incurable.
  16. That either party is afflicted with a sexually transmissible infection that is serious or appears to be incurable.

The bill introduces four additional bases for divorce:

  1. Separation for at least five years at the time the petition is filed, with reconciliation highly improbable, except if the separation is due to the overseas employment of one or both spouses in different countries, or due to the employment of one of the spouses in another province or region distant from the conjugal home.
  2. Psychological incapacity of the other spouse as defined in Article 36 of the Family Code, whether or not the incapacity was present at the time of marriage or later.
  3. When one of the spouses undergoes gender reassignment surgery or transition from one sex to another.
  4. Irreconcilable marital differences and conflicts resulting in the total breakdown of the marriage beyond repair despite the efforts of both spouses.

What do you think of the listed grounds for divorce?  Do you think these aptly cover all possible situations that an unhappily married couple may face?

We’d love to hear from you!

Reference: https://www.rappler.com/nation/196612-explainer-house-divorce-bill

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Mar 27

On Monday, April 2, 2018, the Social Security System (SSS) will once again open its doors to members who with unpaid obligations with the agency.  This is another opportunity that the state-run pension  fund is extending to members to allow them to settle overdue loans and regain their good standing with the SSS to avoid problems with their claims later on.

Who can benefit from this offer?

The SSS will condone penalties of member borrowers, making special mention of those who were affected by the Marawi siege and Mayon Volcano eruption.

How will members benefit from the program?

Members with delinquent accounts will not have the opportunity to settle their overdue loan principal and interests – in full payment or through installment basis – with respect to the SSS’ terms, depending on the member’s capacity to pay.

Whether the member is paying in full or through installment basis, the SSS will waive the loan penalties after the member has completed payment for the restructured loan.

Below is a summary of the program’s provisions, for reference:

  • Past due payments for the following loans:
    • Salary loan
    • Emergency loan
    • Old educational loan
    • Study Now, Pay Later Plan
    • Voc-tech loans,
    • Y2K loans,
    • Investments Incentive Loan
    • Other loans that were past due for at least six months as of April 2, 2018.
  • An interest rate of 3% will be implemented for restructured loans.
  • Penalties will be condoned upon full payment, with option to renew the loan after six months.
  • Members will be back to “good standing” with the SSS, be able to apply for new loans, and be assured of fully enjoying their final benefit claims in the future.
  • Members who were granted condonation in the last loan restructuring program of the SSS will no longer be accommodated.

Visit the nearest SSS branch office in your area now to know more about this offer.  The SSS Loan Restructuring Program will be available until October 1, 2018.

Reference: www.sss.gov.ph

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Mar 19

There are a total of 112 state universities and colleges and about 78 local universities and colleges that are covered by the free tuition fee law signed by the President last week.  We are sharing the list of schools that are expected to comply with the free tuition fee law beginning June 2018.

National Capital Region

  • Eulogio ‘Amang’ Rodriguez Institute of Science and Technology
  • Marikina Polytechnic College
  • Philippine Normal University
  • Philippine State College of Aeronautics
  • Polytechnic University of the Philippines
  • Rizal Technological University
  • Technological University of the Philippines
  • University of the Philippines System
  • Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila
  • Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Muntinlupa

Region I – Ilocos Region

  • Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University
  • Ilocos Sur Polytechnic State College
  • Mariano Marcos State University
  • North Luzon Philippines State College
  • Pangasinan State University
  • University of Northern Philippines
  • Ilocos Sur Community College
  • University of Eastern Pangasinan
  • Binalatongan Community College
  • Urdaneta City University

Cordillera Administrative Region

  • Abra State Institute of Science and Technology
  • Apayao State College
  • Benguet State University
  • Ifugao State University
  • Kalinga State University
  • Mountain Province State University

Region II – Cagayan Valley

  • Batanes State College
  • Cagayan State University
  • Isabela State University
  • Nueva Vizcaya State University
  • Quirino State University

Region III – Central Luzon

  • Aurora State College of Technology
  • Bataan Peninsula State University
  • Bulacan Agricultural State College
  • Bulacan State University
  • Central Luzon State University
  • Don Honorio Ventura Technological State University
  • Nueva Ecija University of Science and Technology
  • Pampanga State Agricultural University
  • Philippine Merchant Marine Academy
  • Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
  • Tarlac College of Agriculture
  • Tarlac State University
  • Mabalacat College
  • Baliuag Polytechnic College
  • Bulacan Polytechnic College
  • City College of Angeles
  • City College of San Fernando, Pampanga
  • Eduardo L. Joson Memorial College
  • Guagua Community College
  • Kolehiyo ng Guiguinto
  • Kolehiyo ng Subic
  • Limay Polytechnic College
  • Norzagaray College
  • Pambayang Dalubhasaan ng Marilao
  • Polytechnic College of Botolan
  • Polytechnic College of the City of Meycauayan

 Region IV-A – CALABARZON

  • Batangas State University
  • Cavite State University
  • Laguna State Polytechnic University (Laguna State Polytechnic College)
  • Sourthern Luzon State University
  • University of Rizal System
  • Balian Community College
  • City College of Calamba
  • Colegio de Montalban
  • Colegio ng Lungsod ng Batanga
  • Dalubhasaan ng Lungsod ng Batangas
  • Dalubhasaan ng Lungsod ng Lucena
  • Kolehiyo ng Lungsod ng Lipa
  • Laguna University
  • Pambayang Kolehiyo ng Mauban
  • San Mateo Municipal College
  • Trece Martires City College
  • Antipolo Institute of Technology (AiTech)
  • Tanauan City College (TCC)
  • Pamantasan ng Cabuyao (PNC)
  • Dalughasaan ng Lungsod ng San Pablo
  • City College of Tagaytay (CCT)

Region IV-B – MIMAROPA

  • Marinduque State College
  • Mindoro State College of Agriculture and Technology
  • Occidental Mindoro State College
  • Palawan State University
  • Romblon State University
  • Western Philippines University
  • Baco Community College
  • MIMAROPA City College of Calapan

Region V – Bicol Region

  • Bicol University
  • Bicol State College of Applied Sciences and Technology
  • Camarines Norte State College
  • Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges
  • Catanduanes State University
  • Central Bicol State University of Agriculture
  • Emilio B. Espinosa, Sr. Memorial State College of Agriculture and Technology
  • Partido State University
  • Sorsogon State College
  • Community College of Manito
  • Ligao Community College
  • Baao Community College
  • Calabanga Community College
  • Caramoan Community College
  • City College of Naga
  • Daraga Community College
  • Libon Community College
  • Oas Community College
  • Polangui Community College
  • Rapu-Rapu Community College
  • San Jose Community College
  • Sorsogon Community College
  • Donsol Community College (DCC)
  • San Pascual Polytechnic College (SPPC)
  • Aroroy Municipal College (AMC)
  • Governor Mariano E. Villafuerte Community Colleges

Region VI – Western Visayas

  • Aklan State University
  • Capiz State University
  • Carlos C. Hilado Memorial State College
  • Guimaras State College
  • Iloilo State College of Fisheries
  • Central Philippines State University
  • Northern Iloilo Polytechnic State College
  • Northern Negros State College of Science and Technology
  • University of Antique
  • Iloilo Science and Technology University
  • West Visayas State University
  • Iloilo City Community College (ICCC)
  • Passi City College
  • Libacao College of Science and Technology
  • Bago City College

Region VII – Central Visayas

  • Bohol Island State University
  • Cebu Normal University
  • Cebu Technological University
  • Negros Oriental State University
  • Siquijor State College
  • Buenavista Community College
  • Carcar City College
  • Sibonga Community College
  • Trinidad Municipal College

Region VIII – Eastern Visayas

  • Eastern Samar State University
  • Eastern Visayas State University
  • Leyte Normal University
  • Naval State University
  • Northwest Samar State University
  • Palompom Polytechnic State University
  • Samar State University
  • Southern Leyte State University
  • University of Eastern Philippines
  • Visayas State University
  • Maasin City College

Region IX – Zamboanga Peninsula

  • H. Cerilles State College
  • Jose Rizal Memorial State University
  • Western Mindanao State University
  • Zamboanga City State Polytechnic College
  • Zamboanga State College of Marine Sciences and Technology
  • Zamboanga del Sur Provincial Government College (ZdSPGC)

Region X – Northern Mindanao

  • Bukidnon State University
  • Camiguin Polytechnic State College
  • Central Mindanao University
  • University of Science and Technology of Southern Philippines – Cagayan De Oro Campus
  • MSU – Iligan Institute of Technology
  • University of Science and Technology of Southern Philippines – Claveria Campus
  • Northwestern Mindanao State College of Science and Technology
  • Pangantucan Bukidnon Community College (PBCC)
  • Magsaysay College
  • Initao College
  • Alfonso D. Tan College
  • Northern Bukidnon Community College
  • Opol Community College
  • Tagoloan Community College

Region XI – Davao Region

  • Compostela Valley State College
  • Davao Del Norte State College
  • Davao Oriental State College of Science and Technology
  • Southern Philippines Agri-Business and Marine and Aquatic School of Technology
  • University of Southern Philippines
  • Kapalong College of Agriculture, Sciences, and Technology (KCAST)
  • Governor Generoso College of Arts, Sciences, and Technology (GGCAST)
  • Monkayo College of Arts, Sciences, and Technology
  • Kolehiyo ng Pantukan (KNP)

Region XII – Main SOCCSKSARGEN

  • Cotabato State University
  • Cotabato Foundation College of Science and Technology
  • Sultan Kudarat State University
  • University of Southern Mindanao
  • Glan Institute of Technology
  • Makilala Institute of Science and Technology
  • Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
  • Adiong Memorial Polytechnic State College
  • Basilan State College
  • Mindanao State University
  • MSU-Tawi-Tawi College of Technology and Oceanography
  • Sulu State College
  • Tawi-Tawi Regional Agricultural College

Region XIII – Caraga Administrative Region

  • Agusan del Sur State College of Agriculture and Technology
  • Caraga State University (Northern Mindanao State Institute of Science and Technology)
  • Surigao del Sur State University
  • Surigao State College of Technology
  • Hinatuan Southern College

According to the CHED, the recipients of the free tuition fee privilege shall be required to render services to their respective colleges and universities.  Menial tasks like providing assistance in the library and other similar activities may be required by the school administration from qualified students.  Whatever these tasks are going to be, the schools must make sure that the service does not get in the way of the students’ academic requirements and study time.

A student’s tuition and miscellaneous fees will be waived for as long as:

  1. They pass or meet the admission and retention policies of the institution;
  2. They have no previous undergraduate degree; and
  3. They are not overstaying.

Needless to say, schools will now be more stringent in monitoring their students’ grades to make sure that the privilege is not abused and the objectives of the law are met.  At the end of the day, what we all want is for every Filipino, regardless of economic status, to be provided with quality education and equipped to perform in the corporate or business arena later on.

Reference: www.ched.gov.ph

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