Tag Archive: Problems with PSA Certificate


5 May 21

Now that we know the different types of birth certificate errors and how we can have these corrected, the next question we need to answer is when will the amended copies of the birth certificate be made available? 

This is important information that we all need to know, especially since Pinoys only attend to matters such as birth certificate corrections when a bigger concern is at hand.  For example, you are applying for an overseas job and therefore, you need a passport.  However, you could not secure a passport because there is an error in your birth certificate (such as the spelling of your name, incorrect gender, birth date, or birthplace.).  So you proceed to the LCR of your birthplace to have the error corrected, hoping that you can get it done in a jiffy.

Jiffy is not possible when correcting entry in a birth certificate.  It takes time to apply the corrections and has an amended copy of the document available for the owner’s use.

We did research on how long a birth certificate is corrected and we found out that the timeline actually depends on the type of correction involved.  Needless to say, if your birth certificate required a court proceeding, it would take so much longer than expected.

Below is the list:

  1. Administrative Correction:
  1. Supplemental Report – 1 month
  2. Change of first name – 4 to 7 months
  3. Change of Gender/Correction of Birthday or birth month – 4 to 7 months
  1. Correction of Clerical Error

All cases under correction of clerical error are processed within 2 to 5 months.

  1. Judicial Correction

Cases under judicial correction are expected to be significantly longer; these could go on from one to one and a half years or even longer, depending on how complicated the case is.

Source:

http://www.psa.gov.ph

http://www.filipiknow.net

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5 May 14

As mentioned in our previous blogs, there are three ways you can have the errors in your birth certificate corrected: by filing a petition for correction, going to court, or filing a supplemental report.

Today’s blog will tackle the birth certificate errors that can be corrected by supplemental reports.

What birth certificate errors need a Supplemental Report?

  1. No first name, middle name, or last name (legitimate).
  2. No middle name (if the owner is illegitimate and acknowledged by the father).
  3. The first name on the birth certificate is written as Baby Boy, Baby Girl, Boy, or Girl and the child was born before 1993.
  4. No check mark for gender/there are check marks for both genders.
  5. The illegitimate child wants to use the father’s surname. Take note that this correction only involves the surname. Changing status to legitimate or illegitimate requires court order/proceeding.

How to file for a Supplementary Report

  1. Prepare an affidavit by indicating the missing detail entry of the birth certificate owner;
  2. Include the reasons why the field was left blank in the birth certificate;
  3. Prepare other supporting documents that could help in your petition, such as medical records, school records, etc.

Submit your petition to the Local Civil Registry Office of the city or municipality where the birth was registered.  If the birth certificate owner was born abroad, he can file the petition at the Philippine Consulate where the birth was reported.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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4 Apr 24

There are two types of errors that can happen to your birth certificate: one that can be corrected by filing a petition for correction, and one that requires legal proceedings and court hearings.  We summarized the different types of birth certificate errors and how these can be corrected.  Read on.

Administrative Correction

Always remember that all the entries in your birth certificate are transcribed by human hands.  The document may have been accomplished by your parents, a nurse at the hospital where you were born, the midwife that assisted during your mother’s delivery, or any one of your relatives.  Upon registration, a staff at the Local Civil Registry office will again transcribe your details to create your birth certificate; during which, typographical errors and misspellings are likely to be committed.  These are considered clerical errors and are not done intentionally.

These types of errors may cause delays in your transactions and applications but the good news is, it can be fixed without much expense and without the need for a lawyer’s services.

Here are the different types of corrections that fall under Administrative Corrections:

  1. Change of First Name
  • First name being used is different from the first name on the birth certificate.
  • The first name on the birth certificate is written as “Baby Boy”, “Baby Girl”, “Boy”, or “Girl” and the child was born 1993 onwards.
  1. Wrong Gender or Wrong Day or Month of Birth
  • Date of birth (day or month) is wrong.
  • The wrong gender is checked.
  1. Clerical Error Correction
  • Blurred name (first, middle, or last name)
  • Mother’s last name is wrong while the child’s middle name is correct.
  • Child’s middle name is wrong while the mother’s last name is correct.
  • Wrong spelling of the name (first, middle, or last name).
  • Middle and last names have been interchanged.
  • Middle initial entered instead of the full surname.
  • The wrong gender is checked.
  1. Supplemental Report
  • No first name, middle name, or last name (if legitimate).
  • No middle name (if illegitimate and acknowledged by the father).
  • The first name on the birth certificate is written as “Baby Boy”, “Baby Girl”, “Boy”, or “Girl” and the child was born before 1993.
  • No check mark for gender/there are check marks for both genders.
  • The illegitimate child wants to use the father’s surname.  Take note that this correction only involves the surname.  Changing status to legitimate or illegitimate requires court order/proceeding.

Judicial Correction

These types of corrections cannot be processed by the birth certificate owner on his own and therefore must undergo judicial proceedings.

Below are the requirements for judicial correction:

  • Documents containing information or entries pertinent to your case.  The documentary requirements you will submit depends on the correction you are requesting and will be subject to evaluation once you file your case with the Regional Trial Court (RTC).
  • Prepare to pay court fees which is the sum total of the initial filing, sheriff’s, photocopying, postage, and notarization fees.  You also need to prepare your pocket for additional fees such as newspaper fees for the mandatory 3-week publication requirement, lawyer’s professional fees, pleading fees, and court appearance fees.

Reference: https://filipiknow.net/birth-certificate-correction/?fbclid=IwAR14os3EPdWocgLOXrbvNr0ohDwIpP8_QFbdbIhTGq5EBZ4_3Yt78Pmx3kM

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2 Feb 19

Another common birth certificate error involves the owner’s last name (family name).  This could either be blurred, misspelled, or missing (especially if the child is illegitimate).  Unlike first and middle names, correcting the last name can be complicated as some cases require the intervention of a lawyer or a court proceeding.

Today, we are going to feature four cases of last name issues on a birth certificate and how each can be addressed.

  1. Blurred Last Name

Solution 1: If the record of PSA is blurred, you may request the Local Civil Registrar to endorse a copy of your birth certificate with a clearer entry in the last name to the PSA.

Solution 2: If the record of the PSA and the civil registry are both blurred, file a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.

Supporting Documents:

  • Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  • Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business records, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  • Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  • Payment of One Thousand Pesos (Php 1,000) as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50.00 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  • Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.
  1. Misspelled Last Name

If the cause of the error is clearly typographical, causing the last name to look and sound foolish, this can be corrected by filing a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.

Supporting Documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  3. Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  4. Payment of One Thousand Pesos (Php 1,000) as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

  1. No Last Name

If the last name in the birth certificate is blank, a supplemental report should be filed to supply the missing entry.

To supply the missing entry, an affidavit indicating the entry missed in the registration and the reasons why there was a failure in supplying the required entry.  Supporting documents should be provided to show the name of the child.

Supporting Documents:

To supply the missing entry, an affidavit indicating the entry missed in the registration and the reasons why there was a failure in supplying the required entry.  Other supporting documents should be provided to show the first name of the child.

Take note that the LCR or the PSA will advise you of the best course to take when having your birth certificate entries corrected, especially when the error involves your last name.  Always remember that there is a very big possibility that you will be endorsed to a lawyer and a court proceeding may be required to apply the needed corrections.

Reference: http://www.psa.gov.ph/

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Feb 14

Sofie has always known that her mother’s name is Emelita.  That is the name written on all her mother’s IDs and on the birth certificates of Sofie and her siblings.  However, when Aling Emelita requested for a copy of her PSA birth certificate, they were shocked to see that her name is actually not Emelita but Maria Rosario!  All other information on her birth certificate is correct, her birth date, birthplace, and the names of her parents.  Everything, except her name.

They discovered this in the early ‘90s when Aling Emelita was preparing to work abroad.  Since she was in a hurry to get a passport, she resolved to use her Maria Rosario birth certificate and was granted a passport as Maria Rosario.

When Sofie graduated from high school with flying colors, her parents gifted her and her siblings a trip to Tokyo Disneyland.  Sofie and her three siblings, all minors, trooped to the DFA to get their passports.  But they were all horribly disappointed when their applications were put on hold because of the inconsistency in their mother’s name as written on their birth certificates and the name that appears on their mother’s birth certificate.  On their birth certificates, their mother is Emelita.  But on Aling Emelita’s, her name is Maria Rosario.

How does one correct their parent’s name as it appears on their birth certificate?

While it is clear that Aling Emelita has chosen to simply adopt her name as written on her birth certificate (Maria Rosario), she failed to work on correcting the details on her children’s birth certificates, where her name is still written as Emelita. 

Sofie and her siblings need to have their birth certificates corrected to reflect their mother’s name as Maria Rosario.  Here’s what they need to do:

  1. They need to go to the Local Civil Registry of their birthplace and request for correction of their mother’s name as it appears on their birth certificates.
  2. They must bring a copy of Aling Emelita’s PSA birth certificate where her name is written as Maria Rosario.  Any other government-issued ID of Aling Emelita (as Maria Rosario) will likewise help in further solidifying their petition.
  3. Fees vary according to municipality and payments must be made only with the city or municipal hall’s cashier.  All payments must be issued with a government receipt.  Be wary of fixers.
  4. When the petition is successfully filed by the LCR, Sofie and her siblings will be given a copy of the Finality and Endorsement pertaining to the correction they requested.
  5. After three to six months, they can begin following up with the PSA for the corrected copies of their birth certificates.  When making a follow-up, bring the Finality and Endorsement documents from the LCR.
  6. The first corrected copies of their birth certificates must be claimed at the PSA head office in Sta. Mesa, building 2.  All other succeeding copies may be requested online at www.psahelpline.ph.

If you have similar concerns about your birth certificate, send us your questions and we will do our best to find the best answer for you.

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Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

 

Jan 04 (1)

Your PSA birth certificate is a primary requirement when applying for a passport with the DFA.  Without it, it would be nearly impossible to get the rest of the application process done.

Unfortunately, there are some people who really do not have their civil registry documents on file at the PSA.  When they request for a copy, they receive a Negative Certification, indicating that they do not have any records or theirs may have gotten lost during or after the war.

How do you apply for a passport if you do not have a birth certificate?

Let us show you how:

If you were born in or after January 1, 1950, you need to submit the following:

General Requirements:

  1. Personal appearance at your chosen DFA branch.
  2. Confirmed appointment (done online at www.passport.gov.ph/appointment)
  3. Accomplished application form.
  4. Valid picture ID with photocopy.
  5. Supporting Documents

In case of NO BIRTH CERTIFICATE:

  1. Apply for the delayed registration of birth at the local civil registry office at the applicant’s place of birth.
  2. Submit the following documents:
    • Authenticated Negative Result of Birth Certificate from the PSA.
    • Supporting public documents with the correct date and place of birth such as:
      • Form 137
      • Voter’s registration record
      • Baptismal certificate with readable dry seal.
      • National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) certificate with photo and readable dry seal (for Muslim applicants).

If you were born in or before December 31, 1949:

General Requirements:

  1. Personal appearance at your chosen DFA branch
  2. Confirmed appointment (done online at www.passport.gov.ph/appointment)
  3. Accomplished application form
  4. Valid picture ID with photocopy
  5. Supporting documents

In case of NO BIRTH CERTIFICATE:

  1. Certificate of Non-availability of Record from the Philippine Statistics Authority.
  2. Notarized Joint Birth Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons
  3. Any public document with the correct full name, and date and place of birth such as:
    • Baptismal Certificate with readable dry seal
    • National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) Certificate with photo and readable dry seal (for Muslim applicants).

If you are unable to secure a copy of your birth certificate from the PSA, proceed right away to the LCR of the city or municipality where you were born.  There are a multitude of reasons why your birth records may not be available at the PSA, you just need to find out why so you would know what to do next.  The LCR would be able to tell you what you need to do in order to have your birth records documented, or corrected, or reconstructed, whatever the case may be.

If you have questions about birth certificates, send us a message and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

References:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.dfa.gov.ph

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10 - 23

About 15 years ago when I first worked on my passport application, I got overwhelmed with all the documents and IDs I needed to prepare.  I thought to myself, if this is how complicated the process is, how can senior citizens, PWDs, and other citizens with special needs and cases manage to get everything done.

A lot has changed since the first time I applied for a passport (and have only been renewing my passport ever since.  Passport renewals are simpler than applying for the first time).  And now that I have been given the facility to help and reach out to others, I decided to come up with a quick guide on the general requirements, fees, and turn-around-time for the applicants to receive their passports.

Save this article in your bookmarks to serve as your ready reference when you or a family member, friend, or even a total stranger asks for the basics when applying for a Philippine passport.

Read on!

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

  1. Personal appearance of applicant.
  2. Confirmed appointment.  You may set an appointment at www.passport.gov.ph/appointment
  3. Accomplished application form.  You may download a copy at www.dfa.gov.ph
  4. PSA-issued Birth Certificate.  You may order for a copy of your PSA documents at www.psahelpline.ph
  5. Government-issued picture ID with photocopy.
  6. Supporting documents and IDs.  You may check the list of acceptable documents and IDs here: http://dfa.gov.ph/images/OCA/Forms/RequirementsForPassportApplication.pdf

FEES AND PROCESSING TIME

  1. Express processing fee – P1,200

Ideal processing time is:

    • 7 working days for Metro Manila applicants
    • 10 working days outside Metro Manila.
    • The stated processing period does not include the delivery time.

     2. Regular processing fee – P950

Processing time is:

  • 20 working days for Metro Manila applicants
  • 30 working days outside Metro Manila.
  • The stated processing period does not include the delivery time.

VALID IDs

The DFA accepts any one of the following:

  1. Digitized SSS ID
  2. Driver’s License
  3. GSIS E-card
  4. PRC ID
  5. IBP ID
  6. OWWA ID
  7. Digitized BIR ID
  8. Senior Citizen’s ID
  9. Unified Multi-purpose ID (UMID)
  10. Voter’s ID
  11. Old College ID
  12. Alumni ID
  13. Employment ID

FOR APPLICANTS WHO DO NOT HAVE ANY BIRTH RECORD

  1. If born in or after January 1, 1950:
    • All general requirements listed above.
    • Apply for the delayed registration of birth at the local civil registry office at the applicant’s place of birth.
    • Submit the following documents:
  2. Born in or before December 31, 1949:
    • All general requirements as listed above.
    • Certificate of Non-availability of Record from the Philippine Statistics Authority.
    • Notarized Joint Birth Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons.
    • Any public document with the correct full name, and date and place of birth such as:
      • Baptismal certificate with readable dry seal.
      • National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) Certificate with photo and readable dry seal (for Muslim applicants).

FOR APPLICANTS WHO HAVE BEEN NATURALIZED

  1. All general requirements as listed above.
  2. Identification Certificate of Naturalization
  3. Oath of Allegiance.

Note that the DFA may require additional documents and IDs, especially if the applicant is a minor, adopted, traveling without his parents, and many other cases involving legitimacy, age, and physical condition of the minor or the traveler.  It would be best to be ready with the above documents as these are the basic requirements when applying for a passport.  Preparing these in advance will help you save time, effort, and money.

For more information on passport application, you may visit the DFA’s website at www.dfa.gov.ph

Reference:

www.dfa.gov.ph

 

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06 - 05 (2)

Minerva was already 23 years old when she learned that her father is married with children before she was born.  She learned about it the hard way – when she landed her first job, her supervisor turned out to be her father’s eldest son from his previous marriage, making him her half-brother.

She did her research and found out that her father’s marriage with his previous wife is still in effect; he had not filed for an annulment and in fact, has been sending financial support for his children while staying with Minerva and her mom!

What proved to be more difficult and confusing for Minerva is the fact that her status in her birth certificate is ‘Legitimated’ (due to subsequent marriage).  As far as she knows, she was born before her father (who was presumed to be single then) and mother were ‘married’.  They got married when Minerva was 7 years old, she even stood as flower girl during their wedding!

Now that it looks like her father is not even legally capable of ‘marrying’ her mother in the first place, what does that make of her ‘legitimation’?

What is ‘Legitimation’?

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website, legitimation is a remedy by means of which those who in fact were not born in wedlock and should, therefore, be considered illegitimate, are by fiction, considered legitimate, it being supposed that they were born when their parents were already validly married.

Who can be ‘Legitimated’?

Legitimation may be done for children who were conceived before their biological parents were married, provided that their parents were not disqualified by any impediments to marry each other.

For a child to be considered legitimated by subsequent marriage, it is necessary that:

  • The parents could have legally contracted marriage at the time the child was conceived;
  • That the child has been acknowledged by the parents before or after the celebration of their marriage; and
  • The acknowledgment was made with the consent of the child, if age or with the approval of the court, if a minor, unless it has been made in the certificate before a court of record, or in any authentic writing.

In all aspects, Minerva’s legitimation would have been legal and binding except for the fact that her father is married to another woman at the time he ‘married’ Minerva’s mother.  Effectively, this invalidates Minerva’s legitimation because the marriage between her parents is invalid.  In fact, she is not even qualified for legitimation.

Can a legitimation be cancelled?

Yes it can be cancelled by filing a petition for cancellation before the court where the petitioner’s birth certificate was registered.  The petitioner will need the assistance and guidance of a lawyer.  When approved, the civil registrar shall again annotate in the birth certificate that the ‘legitimation’ (also a previous annotation) is hereby cancelled.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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05 - 29

The Philippines is the bastion of Christianity in Asia with over 93% of our population listed as Christians; we ranked 5th worldwide according to a 2011 report of the Philippine Daily Inquirer.  Filipinos take religiosity pretty seriously.  To us, it is not just some form of affiliation or membership, it is a legacy passed on to us, an identity we must protect and preserve at all costs.

And so it IS a big deal to have to find out that your religion, as written in your birth certificate, is anything but Catholic or Christian. 

Such was the case of Arabah Joy Quinto, a Roman Catholic by birth.  After receiving an Exchange Scholar grant from her high school, she immediately applied for a passport at the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA).  She thought she had all the needed documents prepared until she was required to submit a certificate from the Office of Muslim Affairs (OMA)!  Apparently, her birth certificate shows that her parents are Muslims.  She insisted that her entire family has always been devout Roman Catholics, all of them baptized by the Catholic Church as supported by their birth certificates.  The DFA would have none of it; either she presents the required OMA or have the entries in her birth certificate corrected.

How to Correct a ‘Wrong Religion’?

There are two ways of rectifying incorrect entries in a birth certificate:

  1. Under RA No. 9048 or Clerical Error Law (as amended by RA 10172) if the matter involved correcting typographical errors in the First Name, Place of Birth, Day and month of Birth , or Gender.
  2. Through a petition in court if the correction is not covered by any of the above cases.

Correcting the entries in ‘Religion’ is not included in the errors covered by RA 9048 or 10172.

In this case, Arabah Joy needs to file a petition for Correction of Entry in the Regional Trial Court of the place where her birth was registered.  Once filed, the court shall set the case for a hearing, followed by publication of the correction in a local newspaper.

As soon as the petition is granted, the LCR of Arabah’s birth place will receive a certified copy of the court’s decision.  The LCR will be directed to apply the necessary annotations on Arabah’s birth certificate, so that the same shall now reflect her parents’ correct religion.

The first corrected copy of Arabah’s birth certificate may be requested from a PSA office while succeeding copies may be ordered online at www.psahelpline.ph

If you have questions about civil registration in the Philippines, please feel free to drop usa  line and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Sources:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.gov.ph (The Family Code of the Philippines)

www.manilatimes.net

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Manila City Hall_12

If the place of birth written on your birth certificate is not the same as the one written on your passport or any other document that you use as an identification, you might encounter problems with your transactions as this is a vital ID information.

Here are the steps you need to follow when filing for correction of your place of birth under RA 9048:

What You Need To Bring:

(a). 2 latest certified LCR copies and 2 latest PSA (formerly NSO) copies of birth certificate to be corrected.

(b). 2 latest certified copies of certification from the hospital indicating the exact hospital address.  IF the hospital or clinic where the birth certificate owner was born is no longer in existence, the petitioner needs to submit a certification from the Barangay stating that the said hospital or clinic was formerly established in the area and is now no longer in operation.

(c). 2 copies of baptismal certificate.

(d). 2 copies of school records, Elementary and High School, either Form 137/138 or Certificate or College Transcript of Records (TOR).

(e). 2 Certified copies of Voter’s Registration record/voters’ affidavit (COMELEC).

(f). 2 copies of valid ID of the petitioner and the document owner and 1 copy of latest community tax certificate from the place of work or residence.

(g). SPA (Special Power or Attorney).  If the petitioner is abroad, or sick, he/she can be represented by a lawyer or his/her nearest relative (up to third degree of consanguinity).

Reminders:

  1. All civil documents from the PSA (Birth, Marriage, and Death) to be submitted should be the latest certified local copy or on Security Paper from the PSA.
  2. After the compliance of the requirements, please proceed to the information counter.  Only applicants with complete requirements will be allowed to proceed to pre-interview.
  3. Processing of the petition is four (4) months and will commence on the date the petition is received by the Manila City Hall.
  4. Payments are as follows:
    • Registration Fee – P1,000
    • Certified Xerox Copy – P230
    • Transmittal Fee – P210
    • Additional Payment  for documents with supplemental – P30

Please be advised that the city hall does not conduct interviews during Fridays.

Source: http://manila.gov.ph/services/civil-registry/

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