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06 - 23 (1)

If your job requires that you drive a company vehicle or a public transportation, you need to get a Professional Driver’s License.  If you have had a Non-professional License all your life, how do you change it to Professional classification?  How do you change your name on your driver’s license after getting married?  How do you change erroneous entries in your license such as the spelling of your name and your birth date?

This is the second and last part of our series on Driver’s License Application Requirements.  Read and share!

A. CHANGE CLASSIFICATION TRANSACTIONS

  1. License Change Classification – Non-Professional to Professional
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
    • NBI and Police Clearance
      1. NBI
      2. Police Clearance
    • Current or Expired License
  2. License Change Classification – Professional to Non-Professional
    1. Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    2. Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
    3. Current or Expired License

B. REVISION OF RECORDS TRANSACTIONS

  1. Record Change – Incorrect Name/Birth Date
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Original Birth Certificate with Photocopy
      1. PSA Authenticated Birth Certificate with Official Receipt
    • Current or Expired License
    • Affidavit of Discrepancy
  2. Record Change – Change in Name
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Current or Expired License
    • Court Order Authorizing name change
      1. Certification from OMA for Change in Name
  3. Record Change – Change in Marital Status
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Current or Expired License
    • Photocopy of Marriage Contract or Court Order for annulled for Divorce Applicants or Passport with Amendments for change in Marital Status
      1. Court Order for Annulled or Divorced Applicants
      2. Passport with amendments for change in Marital Status
  4. Record Change – Change in Address
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Current or Expired License
  5. Record Change – Change in Citizenship
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Current or Expired License
    • Passport for Change of Citizenship
      1. Alien Certificate of Registration
      2. Foreign License

C. ADDITIONAL RESTRICTION CODE

Additional Restriction Codes 1 to 8

  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

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06 - 22

Did you know that there are more than 10 types of driver’s license applications that can be done at the Land Transportation Office (LTO)?  The most common are Student Permits and Non-professional license applications, but it appears that these are just the tip of the iceberg. Farther are other types of applications for Conductor’s License, License Change Classification (from Non-Professional to Professional), Additional Restriction Codes, and so much more.

We are sharing the LTO’s list of license applications and the corresponding documentary requirements in today’s blog.  Keep this as a bookmark or print a hard copy to serve as your reference when transacting with the LTO.

I. STUDENT PERMIT TRANSACTIONS

  1. New Student Permit
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Original Birth Certificate with Photocopy
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines.
  1. Student Permit – Minor Applicants
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Original Birth Certificate with Photocopy
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Letter of Parental or Guardian Consent with one valid government-issued ID containing the signature of consenting Parent or Guardian.
  1. Student Permit – Foreigners
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines.
  • Original and photocopy of Passport
  • Alien Certificate of Registration I-card
  1. Student Permit – Minor Foreigners
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Original and photocopy of Passport
  • Alien Certificate of Registration I-card
  • Letter of Parental or Guardian Consent with one (1) valid government issued ID card containing the signature of consenting parent/guardian.

B. NEW LICENSE TRANSACTIONS

  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Valid Student Permit
  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional, Filipino, with valid foreign license
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
  • Photocopy of License (not in English)
  • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional, Filipino with expired foreign license
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
  • Photocopy of License (not in English)
  • Translation from Embassy to Consular Officer
  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional, Foreigner with valid foreign license
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines.
  • Original and Photocopy of Passport
    • Photocopy of Passport with entry at least one month and visa duration of at least one year from date of application.
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
  • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional, Foreigner with expired foreign license
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Original and Photocopy of Passport
    • Photocopy of Passport with entry at least one month and visa duration of at least one year from date of application.
  • Photocopy of License (not in English)
  • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician
  • Valid SPR (Student Permit)
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional, Filipino with valid foreign license
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines.
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
    • Photocopy of License (not in English)
    • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional, Filipino w/ expired foreign license
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
    • Photocopy of License (not in English)
    • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional, Foreigner w/ valid foreign license
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Original and Photocopy of Passport
    • Photocopy of Passport with entry of at least one (1) month and working visa duration of at least one (1) year from date of application
    • Photocopy of License (in English)
    • Photocopy of License (not in English)
    • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional, Foreigner w/ expired foreign license
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Original and Photocopy of Passport
    • Photocopy of Passport with entry of at least one (1) month and working visa duration of at least one (1) year from date of application.
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
    • Photocopy of License (not in English)
    • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Conductor’s License
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Original Birth Certificate with Photocopy
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance

C. LICENSE RENEWAL TRANSACTIONS

  1. Non-Professional Driver’s License Renewal
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  1. Non-Professional Driver’s License Renewal – Dormant
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Expired License
  1. Professional Driver’s License Renewal
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  1. Professional Driver’s License Renewal – Dormant
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Expired License
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. Conductor’s License Renewal
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  1. Conductor’s License Renewal – Dormant
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Expired License
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. Advance Renewal Non-Professional
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  • Plane Ticket, Visa or Contract
  1. Advance Renewal Professional
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  • Plane Ticket, Visa or Contract

Tomorrow we are going to include the list of requirements for Duplicate License transactions as well as Changes in License Classification, so make sure to visit us again tomorrow.

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

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06 - 20 (1)

After getting married, the next thing the couple needs to attend to are the updating of their IDs and other public documents, from their old civil status to that of married.  For women, they also have the option to change their maiden last name and begin using their husband’s last name in their IDs and government documents.  Take note that changing the woman’s last name is not mandatory; women have the option to keep their maiden last name for as long as they want.

To help newlyweds get started on this rather daunting task, we are sharing the following information, requirements, and processes involved in updating your marital status and changing your last name:

I. PHILHEALTH

  1. Bring a photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate and the original for verification.
  2. Advise the customer service personnel that you wish to change your marital status; you should be given a blank Membership Form.
  3. Your marital status should be accomplished while you wait; you will also be issued a new Philhealth ID.
  4. This can be done at any Philhealth office or satellite office.
  5. Updating of status and changing of name is free of charge.

II. Bank Records

  1. Bring a copy of your PSA Marriage Certificate; bank personnel normally photocopy the documents within bank premises.
  2. Bring valid IDs.  Banks like BDO and Eastwest prefer IDs that already bear your married name.
  3. Advise bank teller that you want to update your marital status and change your last name.  Most banks do not charge any fees for such updates.

III. Pag-IBIG

  1. Bring the original and photocopies of your PSA Marriage Certificate and valid IDs.
  2. Advise frontline personnel that you wish to update your marital status and last name.  You will be given an MCIF (Members Change of Information Form) for you to fill out.
  3. This can be done at any Pag-IBIG branch office near you.
  4. Updating your information is free of charge but if you wish to get a Loyalty Card, prepare Php 100.00.
  5. Updating of member’s information can be accomplished while you wait.

IV. SSS

  1. If you are employed, advise your employer that you wish to update your SSS data.  You will be given a Member’s Data Amendment Form (E4).  Fill it out and submit to your HR.
  2. Attach a photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate, SSS, ID, and an authorization letter for your employer to process this on your behalf.
  3. Updating your SSS details is free of charge but requesting for a new ID (UMID) will cost you Php 300.00.  The new ID may take a two to three months before it is issued to you.

V. Passport

  1. Confirmed appointment date and time; you may secure an appointment online at www.dfa.gov.ph
  2. Download a copy of the form online, accomplish it in your handwriting, but do not sign until you are in front of a DFA personnel.
  3. Get a complete list of required documents and IDs from the DFA website; double-check that you have all requirements on the day of your appointment.

VI. Driver’s License

  1. Bring the original and photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate and your current or expired license.
  2. Submit a duly accomplished Application for Driver’s License.
  3. This may be done at any LTO branch and should be accomplished within the day.  Be at the office early.

Sources:

www.lto.gov.ph

www.dfa.gov.ph

www.sss.gov.ph

www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

www.philhealth.gov.ph

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06 - 19

A common requirement in most government and private transactions is a copy of a Barangay Clearance and or a Barangay Certificate  Most people think these two are one and the same so they end up submitting a Certificate when they are required to submit a Clearance, and vice versa.

To help address this common confusion among Filipino citizens, we did a research and found out that these two documents are completely different from each other and are issued for different purposes.  Here is a summary of how  Barangay Clearances and Barangay Certificates are secured, and when these two are needed.  Read on!

Barangay Certificate

  • Otherwise known as Barangay Certificate of Residency.
  • This document proves that you are a resident of a particular barangay.
  • You can be issued a copy of this certificate if you have been residing in a particular barangay for at least 6 months or more.
  • This can be secured at the barangay hall that covers the applicant’s place of residence.

Barangay Clearance

  • A Barangay Clearance is a common requirement for business permits and license applications.
  • This can be secured at the barangay hall that covers the place where the business will operate.

The requirements needed for such certifications and clearances to be issued are detailed in the barangay’s Citizen’s Charter.  Common requirements are:

  • Documents pertaining to the business’ establishment
  • Community Tax Certificate
  • Valid IDs such as Driver’s License, Company ID, GSIS or SSS IDs, Voter’s ID, etc.

Note that a Voter’s ID is just one of the many IDs that may be required from an applicant.  It should not serve as the sole basis for granting a person’s request for a Certificate of Residency.

Next time you are required to submit a certification or clearance from your barangay, clarify which among the two should you submit.  Keep this as your reference in differentiating the documents you are applying for.

Source: www.dilg.gov.ph

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06- 16

Getting married is a once-in-a-lifetime event and all brides-to-be want nothing less than a perfect wedding day.  From the weather, to the place of ceremony, to the littlest of details in the bride’s wedding gown, everything should be flawless.  All because in the Philippines, you’re only supposed to marry once.

Over the years, weddings have become more and more elaborate, more detailed, and more personal.  From the basic white and ecru color motifs, couples have learned to be more bold and creative with their choices in colors, clothing, and quite recently, even the look and feel of the ceremony and reception areas.  Yes, weddings have become more fun and meaningful, yet it has also elevated the costs involved in achieving the desired “themes and motifs”, as wedding organizers would often say.

So how exactly do you plan, organize, and celebrate the perfect dream wedding without breaking the bank?  We researched on this topic and found quite a handful of information from wedding suppliers, organizers, and even brides themselves!  We are sharing everything that we’ve gathered so far and hope these could help you plan the perfect, yet not too expensive, wedding day for you.

  1. Choose the date and time.

According to wedding bloggers, you actually need to decide on the date and time before you even decide on the budget.  A wedding in June could be cheaper than a wedding in December or February since the latter months are considered by most businesses as peak months.

  1. Draft your entourage and guest list.

After you’ve confirmed the date, it is easier to list down the people you wish to be present on your wedding day, including and most importantly, your wedding entourage.  Save up on call toll charges by creating an online group chat or call them through the internet.

  1. Budget. Budget. Budget.

Now that you have a pretty good idea how many people will attend your big day, it is time to work on the wedding budget.  Before deciding how much you intend to spend, you would need to first discuss who will shoulder which expenses.

Filipino wedding traditions are very different from Western culture where the father of the bride shoulders majority, if not all, of the wedding expenses.  Filipino parents seldom shoulder their kids’ weddings unless extremely necessary.  If at all, it is the groom’s parents who share more in the wedding expenses than the bride’s.  Case in point: if you can’t afford your wedding yet, how do you plan to manage a lifelong marriage?

You will have to create a long list of items that need to be purchased, built, and sewn.  Keep in mind too that expenses do not end when you’ve made your way to the altar and exchanged “I dos”.  Your suppliers, drivers, relatives, and other people who will be helping out in your celebration need to be fed, sheltered, and dressed up too.  Prepare your petty cash for incidental expenses that are sure to crop up during the day itself.

  1. Finalize your booking for the ceremony and reception venue.

Weddings are commonly held during the dry months, beginning in December to the early weeks of June.  Top wedding destinations are the cool cities of Tagaytay, Batangas, and Baguio, while more adventurous couples are also keen on celebrating their union by the seashores of La Union, Boracay, Cebu, and Bohol.  The choices are endless and choosing could be fun except you have a budget and guests to consider.  Choose a venue that is not too far from where most of your guests will be coming from.  If you are on a tight budget, we suggest that you hold your ceremony and reception in the same place.  This cuts your expenses on rental fees, decorations, and travel by more than half.

  1. Book your wedding suppliers.

When choosing wedding suppliers, gather as much information from other newlyweds, relatives, and friends as you can.  This gives you first-hand information on the suppliers’ quality of service, negotiable rates, and other important details.  Remember, you do not need to “outsource” everything.  You can borrow, ask for, and create things on your own.  Wedding organizers were non-existent in the ‘80s and ‘90s but are now virtually indispensable.  If they were able to hold grand weddings in the past without the expensive services of a coordinator, why can’t you now?  Ask for your friends’ assistance and delegate assignments to your bride’s maids.  You’d be surprised to find out how much your “squad” wants to be part of your wedding preparations!

If you should spend (or splurge!) on suppliers, you’d be wise to focus on your caterer and photographers.  Your guests will remember your wedding more from the kind and quality of food you served and the candid and wacky photos they will be posting in social media.

And then again, if you have a brother who cooks mean dishes and friends who like to take beautiful photos, you can consider yourself one blessed woman!

  1. Save-the-dates and Wedding Invitations

If you can tap the limitless reach of social media to let everyone know when you’re getting married, use that.  Save-the-date cards add to your expenses and do not do much in ensuring that your guests will show up, so why bother?

While there are hundreds of wedding invitation suppliers who undoubtedly could come up with the most creative invitations for you, remember, you can easily copy a design online and print these yourself!  Invitations end up in people’s waste baskets or filed in a long forgotten shelf anyway, so why spend so much on these stuff?  Take a trip to the bookstore and channel the Martha Stewart in you.  Creating your wedding invitations could also be a good bonding opportunity with your mom, your sisters, and friends.

  1. Buying your wedding apparel.

Divisoria and Baclaran boast of designer quality fabrics that you can send to your trusty seamstress who can create lovely pieces for you and your groom.  If you are paying for your entourage’s gowns, then these two places in Manila are your best bets.  Buying off the rack is convenient but can be too pricey.  Also, expect to lose some weight (or gain some if you’re the type who eats when stressed) after all the stressful wedding preparations so having your gown done by a seamstress will prove to be more convenient when you need some adjustments  done before the big day (because having your gowns altered by designer stores cost money!).

  1. Wedding Permits, Licenses, and Seminars

Now these are the things your wedding suppliers, not even your expensive wedding coordinators, will remind you to accomplish.  Ironically, all your pricey wedding preparations will go to waste if you fail to secure the necessary documents for getting married.

First, you need to secure a Marriage License.  Keep in mind that a marriage license is only valid for 120 days.

Also, secure copies of your PSA birth certificates and CENOMAR (Certificate of No Marriage).  Check your documents for spelling errors and other inaccuracies.

Attend required seminars and retreats (required by either your parish or your municipality) and secure the necessary certifications.  These requirements vary per municipality and parish.

Word of the wise: Accomplish all permits, documents, and seminars yourselves, do not hire the services of fixers no matter how busy you think you are.

  1. Account your expenses

Keep a journal of your expenses and mark off all items that have been paid off and those that will be settled at a later date.  Keep track of your checks, receipts, acknowledgments, and other proofs of payment to avoid confusion and unnecessary expenses.

  1. Hold a pre-wedding gathering of your entourage and suppliers.

It does not have to be fancy; you just need to get them together to ease any tension and encourage coordination.  This is best done a week before the big day.  Include a rehearsal of sorts just to fine tune each person’s responsibility and involvement in the occasion.

Remember, you cannot achieve perfection so leave room for last-minute emergencies and allow your team some errors and oversights.  No matter how hard you prepare, something is bound to go wayward and it’s all part of the fun and excitement.

So enjoy the moment while it lasts.  You will soon realize that preparing for a wedding that lasts for a day pales in comparison to preparing for the marriage that is expected to last a lifetime.

Best wishes!

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06 - 14

Mercy is married to Joel and they have three kids, all minors.  In 2015, they separated, with Joel taking their children with him to the province where they can continue their studies while he tended the family’s farm as his means of income.  Mercy was left in Manila with her parents; she was working as a call center agent at the time of their separation.

In 2016, Joel filed for annulment.  Around the same time the papers were hand-carried by a court personnel to Mercy’s house, she was already dating a new guy from work.  Not long after, Mercy broke the news to her family that she is pregnant.

Her boyfriend, an unmarried man, is willing to acknowledge Mercy’s baby.  Their plan is to get married as soon as Mercy’s previous marriage is officially annulled; they will have their baby legitimized after they get married.

Will Mercy and Joel’s plans succeed?  Will this not cause problems or confusion on the child’s birth right?  Can the child use his biological father’s last name while his mother is still married to her previous husband?

According to the Family Code, a child born to a married woman is considered legitimate, even if the mother declares against its legitimacy, or even if she has been sentenced as an adulteress (Article 164 and Article 167).

Given these insights, Mercy’s boyfriend is not legally entitled to acknowledge the child because Mercy is still married to Joel (pending decision of filed annulment case).  Moreover, letting the child use Mercy’s boyfriend’s last name will cause further confusion in the child’s legitimacy and birth right.  To make matters worse, Mercy’s child is not qualified to be “legitimized due to subsequent marriage” because of the existence of her marriage with Joel at the time of the child’s birth.

Only if Joel, being Mercy’s legal husband at the time of the child’s birth, disputes the child’s legitimacy, will Mercy be able to declare the child as ‘illegitimate’; otherwise, her child remains ‘legitimate’ and registered as Joel’s child.

What are the provisions for remarrying after an annulment has been approved?

It would have been best for Mercy to have waited until the annulment was approved before she and her boyfriend decided to have a child.  Technically, there is even a prescriptive period of 300 days after the annulment has been handed down, before Mercy bears another child, if only to avoid any controversy on her child’s legitimacy.

Below are the specific articles from the Family Code that will help us understand this provision better:

Article 168.  If the marriage is terminated and the mother contracted another marriage within 300 days after such termination of the former marriage, these rules shall govern in the absence of proof to the contrary:

(1) A child born BEFORE 180 days after the solemnization of the subsequent marriage is considered to have been conceived during the former marriage, provided it be born within 300 hundred days after the termination of the former marriage;

(2) A child born AFTER 180 days following the celebration of the subsequent marriage is considered to have been conceived during such marriage, even though it be born within the 300 days after the termination of the former marriage.

It is also good to note that getting married immediately after the issuance of the decree of annulment may be considered a crime of premature marriage; this is punishable under Article 351 of the Revised Penal Code.

Sources:

www.gov.ph

http://www.manilatimes.net

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06 - 06

Classes in public schools opened yesterday, June 5, 2017.  Nearly 27 million students, from grade school to high school, trooped to their respective classrooms, ready to begin a new school year.  Private schools are likewise poised to open their gates next week while enrollment and admissions in colleges and universities are still in full swing.

The Department of Education released a helpful guideline on the different policies involved in school opening, particularly for the grade school and high school levels.   We are sharing the salient points of the material here for your ready and easy reference.

The policies cover both public and private schools.

Read and share!

I. ENROLLMENT POLICY

A. Kindergarten

  • Age qualification – must be 5 years old by the end of August 2017
  • Presentation of birth certificate or baptismal certificate (may be submitted within the school year).
  • Affidavit of identity of the learner, if birth or baptismal certificate is not available.

B. Eligibility to Grade 1

  • Completers of DepEd-accredited Kindergarten programs
  • Kindergarten Catch-up Education Program (KCEP) completers and passed the Philippine ECD checklist.
  • Children who completed alternative Kindergarten programs and passed the validating test (PVT).

II. OPENING OF CLASSES

A. Transfer of Learners

  • Learners Information System (LIS) as platform in the request and release of learner’s school records.
  • School to school transfer of Form 137 (permanent records) should not be hand carried by either the parent or learner.

B. Wearing of Uniforms and IDs

  • School uniforms are not required.
  • IDs will be provided by the school at no cost.

C. No Collection Policy

  • For Kinder to Grade 4 levels – no collection of any fees.
  • For Grade 5 to High School levels
    • No collection of any type during enrolment period up to the first month of classes.
    • Starting second month of every school year, authorized contributions may be collected but on a voluntary basis only.
  • No teacher, school officials, nor school personnel shall collect fees or contributions, nor shall they be entrusted with the safekeeping and disbursement of collections made by the PTA.
  • In no case shall non-payment of voluntary school contributions or membership fees be made a basis for non-admission, non-promotion, or non-issuance of clearance to a student by the school concerned.

III. SCHOOL CALENDAR

School Year 2017-2018

  • 204 school days (June 5, 2017 to April 6, 2018).
  • 195 class days, 5 days INSET, 4 days for the Parent-Teacher conferences.
  • Conduct of General Assembly to orient stakeholders on the curriculum, co-curricular programs, and ancillary services.
  • Private schools may deviate from this calendar but should notify Regional Offices in advance.
  • Deviation should not be earlier than the first Monday of June and not later than the last day of August.

IV. PRIVATE SCHOOL

A. A student is officially enrolled in a private school after:

  • Submission of appropriate admission or transfer credentials.
  • Has made an initial payment of school fees.
  • Authorized to attend classes.

B. Transferring to another private school:

  • A student enrolled in a private school is entitled to transfer provided all obligations with current school are settled.
  • Release of transfer credentials may be withheld due to:
    • Suspension
    • Expulsion
    • Nonpayment of financial obligations
  • A student without appropriate admission or transfer credentials may be provisionally enrolled and attend classes during the school year.  He is given until the last day of the school year to submit his transfer credentials.

C. Tuition and other fees

  • A private school shall determine its rate of tuition and other school fees or charges.
  • Any revisions in rates and tuition fees shall be filed with the Regional Director.
  • Increases in tuition and other school fees shall be subject to the following conditions:
    • Consultation with duly organized student government, parents, and students.
    • No increase in tuition or other school fees shall be approved unless 70% of the proceeds is allocated for increase in salaries or wages of the faculty and other school employees and the balance for institutional development, student assistance, and extension services.
    • In no case shall the return to investments exceed 12%.
  • SHS Voucher – Students automatically qualifying for vouchers:
    • All Grade 10 completers in Public JHSs
    • All Grade 10 completers in SUCs and LUCs
    • All Grade 10 completers in private schools that are ESC grantees
    • Grade 10 completers in non-ESC private schools need to apply for vouchers.

IV. FIELD TRIPS

  • Moratorium on field trips is currently in effect.
  • DepEd officials and personnel shall not endorse any plans, proposals, and intentions relative to the conduct of the field trips.
  • Schools where all arrangements have been set up including approved permits prior to the moratorium may proceed provided that existing guidelines are strictly observed.

Source: http://www.deped.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

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06 - 05 (2)

Minerva was already 23 years old when she learned that her father is married with children before she was born.  She learned about it the hard way – when she landed her first job, her supervisor turned out to be her father’s eldest son from his previous marriage, making him her half-brother.

She did her research and found out that her father’s marriage with his previous wife is still in effect; he had not filed for an annulment and in fact, has been sending financial support for his children while staying with Minerva and her mom!

What proved to be more difficult and confusing for Minerva is the fact that her status in her birth certificate is ‘Legitimated’ (due to subsequent marriage).  As far as she knows, she was born before her father (who was presumed to be single then) and mother were ‘married’.  They got married when Minerva was 7 years old, she even stood as flower girl during their wedding!

Now that it looks like her father is not even legally capable of ‘marrying’ her mother in the first place, what does that make of her ‘legitimation’?

What is ‘Legitimation’?

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website, legitimation is a remedy by means of which those who in fact were not born in wedlock and should, therefore, be considered illegitimate, are by fiction, considered legitimate, it being supposed that they were born when their parents were already validly married.

Who can be ‘Legitimated’?

Legitimation may be done for children who were conceived before their biological parents were married, provided that their parents were not disqualified by any impediments to marry each other.

For a child to be considered legitimated by subsequent marriage, it is necessary that:

  • The parents could have legally contracted marriage at the time the child was conceived;
  • That the child has been acknowledged by the parents before or after the celebration of their marriage; and
  • The acknowledgment was made with the consent of the child, if age or with the approval of the court, if a minor, unless it has been made in the certificate before a court of record, or in any authentic writing.

In all aspects, Minerva’s legitimation would have been legal and binding except for the fact that her father is married to another woman at the time he ‘married’ Minerva’s mother.  Effectively, this invalidates Minerva’s legitimation because the marriage between her parents is invalid.  In fact, she is not even qualified for legitimation.

Can a legitimation be cancelled?

Yes it can be cancelled by filing a petition for cancellation before the court where the petitioner’s birth certificate was registered.  The petitioner will need the assistance and guidance of a lawyer.  When approved, the civil registrar shall again annotate in the birth certificate that the ‘legitimation’ (also a previous annotation) is hereby cancelled.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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06 - 01

To avoid delays when going through pre-flight boarding procedures for your domestic flights, make sure you have ANY of the following identifications on hand.  Note that airport and airline personnel may request for additional IDs as they deem necessary and so it is best that you have more than one government-issued ID with you when travelling.

  1. Passport (Philippine and Foreign Issued)
  2. Driver’s License
  3. Philippine Regulation Commission ID
  4. SSS ID
  5. GSIS E-card
  6. Voter’s ID
  7. Integrated Bar of the Philippines ID
  8. Seaman’s Book
  9. Government Office ID
  10. ACR / ICR
  11. Company ID
  12. Unified Multi-purpose ID
  13. NBI Clearance
  14. Police Clearance
  15. Senior Citizen ID
  16. Postal ID
  17. TIN Card
  18. Barangay Certification
  19. Health Insurance Card ng Bayan
  20. OWWA ID
  21. OFW ID
  22. National Council of Disability Affairs ID
  23. DSWD Certification
  24. School ID with Principal’s signature

Sources:

www.philippineairlines.com

http://www.philippines-travel-guide.com

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06 - 01-1 (1)

If you are due to vacate your rented apartment unit (or any other residential building, including a dorm room or bed space), your landlord should reimburse your security deposit.  This is the money you gave your landlord before you moved in to the property, apart from your advance.  If your unit does not have any damages and is basically ready for the next occupant to move in, the security deposit should be refunded to you in full.

But what if the landlord refuses to hand your security deposit?  How do you get it back?

Step 1:  Review your lease.

You have a contract, right?  Go over the document and verify that you did not violate any of the rules.  Make sure that the contract includes the landlord’s acknowledgment of your advance and security deposits.

A contract clearly stipulates the length of time you are to occupy the unit; if you are leaving before the agreed time is up, your landlord has the right to withhold your deposit.

But I don’t have a contract with the landlord.

You should have at least kept the receipts or acknowledgment slips from when you handed him your advance and deposit.  You will also have a better chance at winning this argument if you maintained punctuality in your monthly payments.

Step 2: Clean the unit before leaving.

Make sure all fixtures such as light bulbs, faucets, electric wall sockets, pipes, cabinets, and windows are all in good working condition before you vacate the property.  Clean up and sanitize rooms, especially the kitchen and bathrooms.  If possible, leave the place looking better than when you moved in.  Do not leave any room for your landlord to complain about damages and dirt.

Your deposit should not be used to pay for the unit’s restoration and other ordinary wear and tear such as:

  1. Faded wall paint
  2. Tacks or nails on the wall
  3. Black spots in the bathroom mirror
  4. Clogged toilet
  5. Stains on figurines, etc.

Step 3: Request for a report on deductions

Should there be unavoidable deductions against your deposit, you may request for a detailed report from the landlord.  Ask him to itemize the expenses, including the cost of each material that he supposedly will purchase to repair your unit.  This way, you can double check that all expenses shall go to damages present in your unit only.

Step 4: Know your rights

Basically, you are entitled to your security deposit and your landlord’s obligation is to hand it back to you before you leave.  He has 30 days to produce the amount if he is not able to give it immediately after you vacate the property.

Should the landlord find any reason why you should not be refunded your deposit, he must send you a letter detailing the damages in your unit.  If you do not receive such letter within 30 days, you may demand for your deposit.

Ultimately, complete and proper information remain to be your best weapons against stubborn landlords.  It helps that they know that you did your research on tenancy laws.

Also, keep a friendly yet professional relationship with your landlord/landlady.  Avoid becoming too close with them or asking for personal favors to discourage familiarity.  Always command respect when dealing with them.

If you have questions about tenancy in the Philippines, drop us a line and we will do our best to find the answers for you!

Source:

www.dotproperty.com.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

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