Tag Archive: PSAHelpline.ph


07 - 17

A leading cause of traffic jams and road mishaps are drivers who deliberately disobey traffic rules.  It could be as uncomplicated as tailgating another vehicle, to overtaking on single or double white lines, to beating red lights especially when there are no traffic enforcers around.

If drivers knew how much they would have to pay, apart from the damages they could cause others because of their negligence, they would probably be a lot more careful on the road.

Our fourth installment in this series will focus on fines and penalties for Frauds and Falsities, and Traffic Violations.  Read on!

1. Frauds and Falsities

Violation Fines and Penalties (Php)
1. Use of fake plates / sticklers / pursuant documents 2,000 to 4,000 to be imposed upon the owner and / or driver of the subject MV.
2. Misrepresenting a copy of a document pertinent to a motor vehicle before the Traffic Adjudication Services 1,500 to be imposed upon the driver or owner.

2. Traffic Violations

Violation Fines and Penalties (Php)
1. Parking

a. Within an intersection

b. Within 5 meters of the intersection

c. 4 meters from the driveway entrance

d. Within 4 meters from a fire hydrant

e. In front of a private driveway

f. On the roadway side of any unmoving or parked MV at the curb edge of the highway.

g. At any place where signs of prohibitions have been installed.

200
2. Reckless Driving

Such as but not limited to the following:

a. Disregarding Traffic Signs

–  Failure to yield right-of-way;

– Failure to yield right-of-way to ambulance police or fire department vehicles;

– Failure to yield right-of-way at a “through highway” or a “stop intersection”

– Failure to give proper signal

– Illegal turn

– Failure to stop motor vehicle and notch handbrake of motor vehicle when unattended

– Unsafe towing.

b. Allowing passenger on top or cover of a motor vehicle except in a truck helper.

c. Failure to provide canvass cover to cargos or freight of trucks requiring the same.

d. Permitting passenger to ride on running board stepboard or mudguard of MV while in motion.

e. Driving for hire motor vehicles in slippers.

f. Driving in a place not intended for traffic or into place not allowed for parking.

g. Hitching or permitting a person or a bicycle, tricycle or skate roller to hitch a motor vehicle.

h. Driving against traffic.

i. Illegal overtaking.

j. Overtaking at unsafe distance.

k. Cutting an overtaking vehicle.

l. Failure to give way to an overtaking vehicle.

m. Increasing speed when being overtaken.

n. Overtaking when left side is not visible or clear of oncoming traffic.

o. Overtaking upon a crest of a grade.

p. Overtaking upon a curve.

q. Overtaking at any railway grade crossing.

r. Overtaking at any intersection.

s. Overtaking between “men working” or “caution” signs.

t. Overtaking at no overtaking zone.

u. Failure to yield the right-of-way.

v. Failure to stop traversing a “through a highway or railroad” crossing.

1,000 – 1st offense

1,500 – 2nd offense and suspension of DL for two months.

2,000 – 3rd offense and suspension of DL for six months

5,000 – succeeding offense and revocation of DL

3. Obstruction

Obstructing the free passage of other vehicles on the highway while discharging or taking passengers or loading and unloading freight, or driving a motor vehicle is such a manner as to obstruct or impede the passage of any vehicle.

200

In our final article, we will feature the violations involving taxi units and other non-traffic violations that can still be fined and penalized by LTO and MMDA.

If you have questions about the LTO, traffic rules, fines and penalties, send us a short message and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

07 - 14

Our third installment on our LTO Fines and Penalties series is all about limits on cargo weight and illegal operation of motor vehicles, more particularly those that are used as public conveyance.  The fines are exorbitant, so make sure you stay within the limits set by the LTO and the MMDA if you belong in these categories.

Read on!

  1. Weights and Load Limits
Violation Fines and Penalties (Php)
1. Load extending beyond the projected without permit 500 – to be imposed upon the driver.
2. Axle overloading An amount equivalent to 25% of MVUC at the time of infringement on owner/operator or driver of trucks and trailers for loading beyond their registered gross weight, vehicle weight.  The penalty shall be waived for loads exceeding the registered GVW by a tolerance of less than 5%.  No motor vehicle shall be allowed to proceed on the roadway if either a dual-wheel axle load shall exceed 13,500 kgs. Or the vehicle load exceeds 150% of the maximum allowable gross weight.
3. Operating a passenger trtuck (bus) with cargo exceeding 160 kgs. 300 – to be imposed upon either the driver / operator / conductor.
4. Allowing more passenger and / or freight or cargo in excess of carrying capacity of MV 300 – to be imposed upon either the driver / operator or conductor.
5. Baggage or freight carried on top of truck exceeds 20 kgs. per square meter and not distributed in such a manner as not to endanger the passenger or stability of the truck. 400

2. Prohibited or Illegal Operation of Motor Vehicles

Violation Fines and Penalties (Php)
1. Out of line For Operators / Owners

 

1st offense – 6,000 for and additional 1,500 per day reckoned from the day of apprehension until the case was settled and suspension of registration and / or impoundment of MV for three months.

 

2nd offense – 6,000 and additional 2,000 per day reckoned from the day of apprehension until the case was settled and suspension of registration and / or impoundment of MV for six months.

 

3rd offense – 6,000 and additional 2,500 per day reckoned from the day of apprehension until the case was settled, revocation of registration and forever banned from applying for a franchise and / or revocation of franchise if franchise holder.

 

For Drivers:

 

1st offense – 250 and suspension of DL for three months.

2nd offense – 500 and suspension of DL for six months.

3rd offense – 750 and suspension of DL for one year.

2. Colorum Operation For operators and owners:

 

1st offense – 6,000 and additional 1,500 per day reckoned from the day of apprehension until the case was settled and suspension of registration and / or impoundment of MV for three months.

 

2nd offense – 6,000 and additional 2,000 per day reckoned from the day of apprehension until the case was settled and suspension of registration and / or impoundment of MV for six months.

 

3rd offense – 6,000 and additional 2,500 per day reckoned from the day of apprehension until the case was settled, revocation of registration and forever banned from applying for a franchise and / or revocation of franchise if franchise holder.

 

For drivers:

 

1st offense – 250 and suspension of DL for three months.

 

2nd offense – 500 and suspension of DL for six months.

 

3rd offense – 750 and suspension of DL for one year

3. Operating a motor vehicle with expired franchise (CPC) Driver – 500

Operator / owner / possessor of MV – 1,000 per day from the date of expiry to date of the CPC.

–          The place, OR/CR of the subject MV shall be suspended for 6 months from the date of apprehension in addition to the fines.

4. Operating or using a “for hire” motor vehicle different from its types of service mentioned in the CPC. First Offense:

For driver – 1,000

For operator – 3,000

 

–          For hire MOTOR VEHICLES used by the members of the family of the operator, during emergency cases is allowed.

 

Second offense:

For driver – 2,000

For operator – 4,000

 

–          And suspension of plates, OR/CR for six months

 

For subsequent offenses and suspension of DL, plate, OR/CR for one year

For driver – 3,000

For operator – 5,000

 

Next week, we will tackle violations on franchising and traffic policies.

If you have questions on LTO fines and penalties, send us a message and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

07 - 13

In the second installment of our series on LTO Fines and Penalties for erring drivers, please take note that this includes offenses committed by public utility drivers and operators.

Today, we are going to feature violations in connection with number plates, equipment, parts, accessories, devices, and markings of motor vehicles.  Lady drivers are strongly advised to go over this list too.

  1. Violations in Connection with Number Plates
VIOLATION PENALTIES (PHP)
1. MV number plates not firmly attached. 200
2. Obscure plates. 200
3. License plates different from body number on Public Utility Motor Vehicle. 500
4. Improper display of a motor vehicle permanent plate. 500
5. Display / Use of an expired commemorative plates or stickers. 2,000
6. Tampered / Marked plates or stickers. 2,000
7. Illegal transfer or use of MV regularly issued MV plates, tags or stickers except security plates on authorized motor vehicle. 10,000

–          Owners/operators are conclusively presumed to have committed the illegal transfer.

–          Drivers of MV involved in illegal transfer of plates or stickers shall suffer the suspension of their DL for three months.

–          If the MV with illegal transferred plates or stickers is used in the commission of a crime, its owner shall suffer the penalty of P12,000 fine and suspension of plates and registration certificate and Official Receipt for two years.

 

2. Violations Relative to Equipment, Parts, Accessories, Devices, and Markings of Motor Vehicles.

VIOLATION PENALTIES (PHP)
1. Operating MV with metallic tires in any public highways. 5,000
2. Defective brakes. 500
3. Use or installation of unnecessary lights in front and rear of a motor vehicle 300
4. Operating motor vehicle without head, tail, plate, and / or brake lights. 300
5. Without muffler 150
6. Without wiper 150
7. Dirty or unsightly or unsanitary MV 300
8. Dilapidated or defective MV 1,000

–          To hold release of plates until defect is corrected.

9. Failure to paint or improper painting of authorized route our PUJ, Filcabs, Shuttle Services, trucks for hire, taxis, and similar for hire motor vehicles operating with fixed routes. 500

–          To hold plates until defect is correct.

10. Non-painting of business or trade name. 500

–          To hold plates until defect is corrected.

11. Use of unauthorized or improvised plates. 300
12. Without or defective hand brakes. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect.

13. Without or defective speedometer. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect.

14. Without or defective windshield wiper. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect.

15. Without rear view mirror. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect

16. Without interior light. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect.

17. Without name or business name and address of operator inscribed on both sides of MV for hire. 500

–          To hold plates or OR/CR until defect is corrected.

18. Unauthorized use of bell, siren, or exhaust whistle. 15,000

–          Forfeiture of said gadgets in favor of the government.

19. Without functional spare tire. 300
20. Without red flag or red lights on projecting end of load extending more than a meter beyond the bed or body, and in the evening red lights visible at least 50 meters away. 500
21. Failure to paint plate number on a motor vehicle for hire. 500

–          To be imposed upon the owner/ operator.

22. Failure to carry EWD 150
23. Failure to install EWD 4 meters from the front and rear of the stalled motor vehicle. 500

–          To be imposed upon the owner/driver.

24. Without capacity marking 375

–          To be imposed upon the owner.

25. Unauthorized installation of jalousies, painted windshield or colored windshield. 600

–          To be imposed upon the owner/driver.

26. Installation of dim/colored lights, strobe lights, dancing lights or similar lights. 600

–          To be imposed upon the owner/operator or motor vehicle.

27. Use or installation of heavily tinted colored/painted windshield or window glass. 600

–          To be imposed upon the owner/operator sun visor or light tinted are allowed.

28. Without permanent tail gate with inscription “not for hire” sign in a private jeepney. 500

–          To be imposed upon the owner.

29. Use/installation of a glaring/stainless object upon at the front and/or rear of a motor vehicle. 500

–          To be imposed upon the owner/driver.

Tomorrow we will focus on illegal operation of motor vehicles and load limits.  If you are an operator or driver of a public utility vehicle, don’t miss our feature story tomorrow.

For questions on traffic violations, fines, and penalties, drop us a line here.  We will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

 

 

 

07 - 11

Anong violation ko?

That is a common defense mechanism of most drivers who go against road rules but would like to dodge fines and penalties.  Does it work?  Well, sometimes it does (with the help of a few hundred bucks).  But most of the time, traffic enforcers choose to slap you with a ticket and worse, confiscate your driver’s license.

Being apprehended for a traffic violation is not such a bad thing.  We all need to learn a lesson or two in order not to commit the same errors in the future, don’t we?  What’s not good about the whole ticket-tubos hullabaloo is when the erring driver is made to pay more than what the law prescribed for his violation.  Has this happened to you before?

Arguing with corrupt enforcers will not get you anywhere.  Unless you know better than them, you will always end up on the losing end.  So to help drivers avoid paying more than what their violation requires, we researched on the LTO-approved rates for traffic and administrative violations’ fines and penalties.

Remember, knowledge is power.

Read on.

  1. Violations in Connection with Licensing
VIOLATION PENALTY (PHP)
1. Driving without license. 1,500
2. Driving with delinquent or expired license. 400
3. Driving with suspended or revoked or improper license. 1,000
4. Failure to carry Driver’s License 200
5. Failure to sign Driver’s License 200
6. Driving under the influence of liquor

First offense

Second offense

For subsequent violations after the second offense.

 

5,000 – and two months suspension of DL

5,000 – and three months suspension of DL

6,000 – and six months suspension of DL;

After third offense, automatic revocation of DL.

7. Driving under the influence of drugs 10,000 – and automatic revocation of license.
8. Allowing an unlicensed/improperly licensed person to drive a motor vehicle. 1,000 – and suspension of plates, registrations and Driver’s License for two months.
9. Possession and use of fake / spurious Driver’s License

– Driver has been issued an authentic license, it shall be suspended for one year in addition to the fine.

– Driver has not bee issued an authentic license, he shall be disqualified from securing a Driver’s License for a period of two years.

2,000
10. Conviction of the driver of a crime using a motor vehicle. 3,000
11. Student driver operating an MV without being accompanied by a licensed driver. 500
12. Unlicensed conductor of a motor vehicle for hire. 500
13. Operating / driving a motor vehicle which is unregistered / improperly registered or with invalid registration 2,000

–          If committed by the driver without the knowledge and consent of the owner/operator.

–          If the driver is also the owner / possessor of the subject motor vehicle.

4,000

–          In both cases the motor vehicle shall be impounded or the plates if any shall be confiscated and shall not be released until properly registered.

14. Operating a motor vehicle with unregistered substitute or replacement engine, engine block or chassis. 5,000

–          The subject MV shall be impounded until such parts are properly registered.

15. Failure to carry Certificate of Registration or Official Receipt of Registration. 150.00
16. Operating / allowing the operation of MV with a suspended / revoked Certified / Official Receipt of Registration 1,000

–          The subject MV shall be impounded and its plate held during the suspension.

–          In addition to the original suspension, the said MV and plates shall further be suspended for two years.

17. Tourist operating or allowing the use of non-Philippine registered motor vehicle beyond the 90 day period of his sojourn in the country. 5,000

–          The MV shall not be allowed to operate by the confiscation of its plates, OR and CR until properly registered.

–          In addition, if the driver is a holder of local driver’s license, the same shall be suspended for one month.

 Tomorrow we will feature violations in connection with number plates, equipment, parts, accessories, and markings on motor vehicles.  These lists will include public utility vehicles, especially those that operate under a franchise.  Please share these articles with all drivers you know, whether driving a private or public utility vehicle.

If you have questions regarding traffic violations and the corresponding penalties, send us a message and we will try our best to find the answers for you.

See you again tomorrow and drive safely!

Source: http://www.lto.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

07 - 10

The fourth and final installment of our series on Philhealth benefits will focus on orthopedic surgeries, renal diseases, and other types of cancer.  When availing of these benefits, it is best to see a Philhealth representative at the hospital where you are confined or call their Action Center number at 02-447-7442.

Read on.

Benefit Package and Amount Selections Criteria
Z MORPH (Mobility, Orthosis, Rehabilitation, Prosthesis Help)

–          First right and / or left below the knee P15,000.00

–          Both limbs P30,000.00

a. Signed ME Form;

b. No associated disabilities or co-morbidities, such as contractures, deformities, mental, and behavioral incapacity, quadriparesis, cardiopulmonary disease;

c. Community ambulation with or without cane, crutches, or walker;

d. At least three months post-amputation, if acquired; and

e. At least 15 years and 364 days of age, if congenital.

Selected Orthopedic Implants

1. Implants for Hip Arthroplasty

a.  Implants hip prosthesis, cemented P103,400.

b. Total hip prosthesis, cementless P169,400.

c. Partial hip prosthesis, bipolar P73,180.

a. Signed ME Form;

b. Should pass Philhealth’s prescribed Clinical Features.

c. Pre-injury status: ambulatory patients.

d. With no more than two co-morbid illnesses based on physical status classification based on ASA.

2. Implants for Hip Fixation

a. Multiple screw fixation (MSF) – P61,500

a. Signed ME Form

b. Any hip fracture not covered under the total hip package for femoral neck fracture.

c. Pre-injury status: ambulatory patients.

d. With no more than two co-morbid illnesses based on: Physical status classification based on ASA (low to moderate risk).

3. Implants for Pertrochanteric Fracture

a. Compression Hip Screw Set (CHS) – P69,000

b. Proximal Femoral Locked Plate (PFLP) – P71,000

a. Signed ME form;

b. CHS: stable fracture of the intertrochanteric area.

c. PFLP: unstable/comminuted pertrochanteric fracture .

d. Pre-injury status: ambulatory patients.

e. With no more than two co-morbid illnesses based on: Physical status classification based on ASA (low to moderate risk).

4. Implants for Femoral Shaft Fracture

a. Intramedullary Nail with Interlocking Screws – P48,740.

b. Locked Compression Plate (LCP) – Broad/Metaphyseal/Distal Femoral LC – P50,740.

a. Signed ME Form

b. Should pass Philhealth’s requirements for Femora Shaft Fracture and physical status classification based on ASA.

“PD First” – for End-stage Renal Disease Requiring Peritoneal Dialysis – P270,000 per year. a. Signed ME Form (to be submitted annually together with the pre-authorization)

b. Patients must have a permanent Tenckhoff peritoneal dialysis catheter properly placed in the abdominal cavity;

c. Patients must have completed PD initiation in an accredited healthcare institution so that the patient is no longer uremic, with stable vital signs and adequately trained (patient himself/herself or a caregiver) to perform PD at home using manual exchanges;

d. Must pass Philhealth’s clinical criteria (including age of patient, history of cancer, etc.)

Colon and Rectum Cancer

a. Colon Cancer

– Stage I – II (low risk) – P150,000

– Stage II (high risk) – III – P300,000

b. Rectum Cancer

– Stage I (clinical and pathologic) – P150,000

– Pre-operative clinical stage I but with post-operative pathologic stage II – III

– Using linear accelerator as mode of radiotherapy P400,000.

– Using cobalt as mode of radiotherapy P320,000

– Clinical Stage II – III

-Using linear accelerator as mode of radiotherapy P400,000.

-Using cobalt as mode of radiotherapy P320,000.

It pays to be well-informed especially with government benefits such as financial assistance when a family member is sick and needs to be hospitalized.  Always make sure that you are transacting with a Philhealth-accredited health institution and medical practitioners.

If you have questions about Philhealth benefits, send us a message and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source: https://www.philhealth.gov.ph/benefits/

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

07 - 07

Z Benefit Packages were created by the government to help address patients’ needs of some cancer cases and other illnesses that require longer hospital confinement and special treatment procedures.  These are available through Philhealth and may be availed by contributing members and their qualified dependents.

In the third installment of our blog series on Philhealth benefits, we are going to feature the partial list of illnesses categorized as “Z” cases and the corresponding amount of Philhealth benefits for each:

Benefit Package and Amount of Benefit Selections Criteria
Acute Lymphocytic / Lymphoblastic Leukemia (standard risk)

Php 210,000.00

a. Signed Member Empowerment (ME) Form;

b. Age 1 to less than 10 years old;

c. White blood cell count <50,000/µL;

d. No CNS leukemia diagnosis

Breast Cancer (Stage 0 to IIIA)

Php 100,000.00

a. Signed ME form

b. Follow Philhealth’s prescribed clinical and TNM staging.

Prostate Cancer (low to maintenance risk)

Php 100,000.00

a. Signed ME Form;

b. Male patients age up to 70 years old;

c. Follow Philhealth’s prescribed clinical stage.

d. Localized prostate cancer; and

e. No uncontrolled co-morbid conditions.

End-state renal disease eligible for requiring kidney transplantation (low risk)

Php 600,000.00

a. Signed ME Form;

b. Age >10 and <70 years old;

Single organ transplant

c. Follow prescribed conditions for kidney transplant for recipient.

d. Certification from social service of the hospital that they can maintain anti-rejection medicines for the next three years.

Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery (standard risk)

Php 550,000.00

a. Signed ME Form

b. Age 19 to 70 years

c. Should pass current medical status and past history as prescribed by Philhealth.

Surgery for Tetralogy of Fallot in Children

Php 320,000.00

a. Signed ME Form

b. Age: 1 to 10 years + 364 days

c. Should pass 2D Echo and Functional Class specifications prescribed by Philhealth.

Surgery for Ventricular Septal Defect in Children

Php 250,000.00

a. Signed ME Form

b. Age: 1 to 5 years + 364 days

c. Must pass 2D Echo results as prescribed by Philhealth.

d. No previous cardiac surgery.

e. Must pass pulmonary artery pressure as prescribed by Philhealth.

Cervical Cancer:

a. Chemoradiation with Cobalt and Brachytherapy (low dose).

Php 120,000.00

 

b. Chemoradiation with Linear Accelerator and Brachytherapy (high dose)

Php 175,000.00

a. Signed ME Form

b. No previous chemotherapy

c. No previous radiotherapy

d. No uncontrolled co-morbid conditions

e. Treatment plan from gynecologic oncologist

On Monday, we will feature Z benefits dealing with fractures, orthopedic implants, and rehabilitation, so stay tuned.

If you have questions about Philhealth benefits, send us a message and we will do our best to search for the best answers for you.

Have a great weekend!

Source: https://www.philhealth.gov.ph/benefits/

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

07 - 06 (1)

Outpatient benefits are applied on hospital visits that are less than 24 hours and without the need for confinement.  Today’s article will focus on such benefits afforded by Philhealth to its contributing members and their dependents.

This is the second part of our feature blog series on Philhealth benefits.

Outpatient Benefits

1. Day Surgeries (Ambulatory or Outpatient Surgeries) – these include elective surgical procedures (non-emergency) ranging from minor to major operations, where patients are safely sent home within the same day for post-operative care.

  • Payments for these procedures are made to the accredited facility through All Case Rates.
  • The case rate amount shall be deducted by the HCI from the member’s total bill, which shall include professional fees of attending physicians, prior to discharge.
  • The case rate amount is inclusive of hospital charges and professional fees of attending physician.
  • Availment condition: Member must have at least three months’ premium contributions within the immediate six months prior to the month of availment.
  • Documents needed: copy of Member Data Record (MDR) and duly accomplished Philhealth Claim Form 1.
  • This is available in all accredited ambulatory surgical clinics (ASC).

2. Radiotherapy

  • Case Rate: P2,000 for radiotherapy using cobalt and P3,000 for linear accelerator (case rate per session).
  • 45 days benefit limit: one session is equivalent to one day deduction from the 45 allowable days per year.
  • Availment condition: Member must have at least three months’ premium contributions within the immediate six months prior to the month of availment.
  • This is available at Accredited HCIs including Primary Care Facilities that are accredited for the said service.

3. Hemodialysis

  • Case Rate: P2,600 per session.
  • 90 days benefit limit: One session is equivalent to one day deduction from the 90 allowable days per year.
  • Availment condition: Member must have at least three months’ premium contributions within the immediate six months prior to the month of availment.
  • This is available at all accredited HCIs.

4. Outpatient Blood Transfusion

  • Case rate: P3,640 (one or more units).
  • Includes drugs and medicines, X-ray, laboratory, operating room.
  • 45 days benefit limit: One session for each procedure is equivalent to one day deduction from the 45 allowable days per year exempted from the SPC rule.
  • Available at all accredited HCIs.

5. Primary Care Benefits

  • Preventive Services
    • Consultation
    • Visual inspection with acetic acid
    • Regular BP measurements
    • Breastfeeding program education
    • Periodic clinical breast examination
    • Counseling for lifestyle modification
    • Counseling for lifestyle modification
    • Counseling for smoking cessation
    • Body measurements
    • Digital rectal examination
  • Diagnostic Examinations
    • Complete blood count
    • Urinalysis
    • Fecalysis
    • Sputum microscopy
    • Fasting blood sugar
    • Lipid profile
    • Chest x-ray
  • Drugs and Medicines
    • Asthma including nebulisation services
    • Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) with no or mild dehydration
    • Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URTI) / Pneumonia (minimal and low risk)
    • Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

Tomorrow we are going to feature Philhealth’s coverage for Z Benefit packages.  These cases include cancer patients, kidney transplantation, Artery Bypass, and the like.

Stay tuned.

Source: https://www.philhealth.gov.ph/benefits/

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

 

06 - 29 (1)

A common question we receive from readers is how to remarry without going through the process of annulment or divorce.  Of course the obvious answer to this question is there is no other way for a married person to get married again unless his or her spouse dies and makes him a widow/widower.  This answer gave birth to more questions about negligence, abandonment, and presumptive death as grounds for the other party to seek solace in another person’s company.  Questions such as: I haven’t seen or heard from my husband for five years! Can I remarry now? fill our mailboxes almost every day.

Oh love, how could you be so sweet and bitter at the same time?

To help shine some light into this madness, we are sharing the following list of legal requirements for declaration of judicial presumption of death, as lifted from the Public Attorney’s Office website.  It would be safe to assume that the absence of any of these requirements would demerit your case of tagging your spouse as “deceased” and prevent you from marrying again.  If you have further questions, you may get in touch with a lawyer who can explain this to you in detail.

Read on.

“Before a judicial declaration of presumptive death can be obtained, it must be shown that the prior spouse has been absent for four consecutive years and the present spouse has a well-founded belief that the prior spouse was already dead.  Under Article 41 of the Family Code, there are four essential requisites for the declaration of presumptive death:

  1. That the absent spouse has been missing for four consecutive years, or two consecutive years if the disappearance occurred where there is danger of death under the circumstances laid down in Article 391 of the Civil Code;
  2. That the present spouse wishes to remarry;
  3. That the present spouse has a well-founded belief that the absentee is dead; and,
  4. That the present spouse files a summary of proceeding for the declaration of presumptive death of the absentee.”

While the requirements may seem lenient, we must be reminded that the court will study the present spouse’s claim closely and will check if he or she exerted effort to locate the missing spouse.  It is up to the court to decide whether these efforts meet the required degree of stringent diligence prescribed by jurisprudence.  Proofs may be gathered to support the present spouse’s claim that he or she really did try to look for the missing spouse; these could be police reports, public announcements about the missing person, and personal testimonies of people involved in the search.

If you are in a similar situation, we hope the above article helped clear some areas you may still be struggling with.  Again, your best recourse is to seek the assistance of a lawyer.

If you have questions about annulment and separation in the Philippines, drop us a line and we will do our best to search for the answer for you.

Reference: www.pao.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

06 - 20 (1)

After getting married, the next thing the couple needs to attend to are the updating of their IDs and other public documents, from their old civil status to that of married.  For women, they also have the option to change their maiden last name and begin using their husband’s last name in their IDs and government documents.  Take note that changing the woman’s last name is not mandatory; women have the option to keep their maiden last name for as long as they want.

To help newlyweds get started on this rather daunting task, we are sharing the following information, requirements, and processes involved in updating your marital status and changing your last name:

I. PHILHEALTH

  1. Bring a photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate and the original for verification.
  2. Advise the customer service personnel that you wish to change your marital status; you should be given a blank Membership Form.
  3. Your marital status should be accomplished while you wait; you will also be issued a new Philhealth ID.
  4. This can be done at any Philhealth office or satellite office.
  5. Updating of status and changing of name is free of charge.

II. Bank Records

  1. Bring a copy of your PSA Marriage Certificate; bank personnel normally photocopy the documents within bank premises.
  2. Bring valid IDs.  Banks like BDO and Eastwest prefer IDs that already bear your married name.
  3. Advise bank teller that you want to update your marital status and change your last name.  Most banks do not charge any fees for such updates.

III. Pag-IBIG

  1. Bring the original and photocopies of your PSA Marriage Certificate and valid IDs.
  2. Advise frontline personnel that you wish to update your marital status and last name.  You will be given an MCIF (Members Change of Information Form) for you to fill out.
  3. This can be done at any Pag-IBIG branch office near you.
  4. Updating your information is free of charge but if you wish to get a Loyalty Card, prepare Php 100.00.
  5. Updating of member’s information can be accomplished while you wait.

IV. SSS

  1. If you are employed, advise your employer that you wish to update your SSS data.  You will be given a Member’s Data Amendment Form (E4).  Fill it out and submit to your HR.
  2. Attach a photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate, SSS, ID, and an authorization letter for your employer to process this on your behalf.
  3. Updating your SSS details is free of charge but requesting for a new ID (UMID) will cost you Php 300.00.  The new ID may take a two to three months before it is issued to you.

V. Passport

  1. Confirmed appointment date and time; you may secure an appointment online at www.dfa.gov.ph
  2. Download a copy of the form online, accomplish it in your handwriting, but do not sign until you are in front of a DFA personnel.
  3. Get a complete list of required documents and IDs from the DFA website; double-check that you have all requirements on the day of your appointment.

VI. Driver’s License

  1. Bring the original and photocopy of your PSA Marriage Certificate and your current or expired license.
  2. Submit a duly accomplished Application for Driver’s License.
  3. This may be done at any LTO branch and should be accomplished within the day.  Be at the office early.

Sources:

www.lto.gov.ph

www.dfa.gov.ph

www.sss.gov.ph

www.pagibigfund.gov.ph

www.philhealth.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

 

06- 16

Getting married is a once-in-a-lifetime event and all brides-to-be want nothing less than a perfect wedding day.  From the weather, to the place of ceremony, to the littlest of details in the bride’s wedding gown, everything should be flawless.  All because in the Philippines, you’re only supposed to marry once.

Over the years, weddings have become more and more elaborate, more detailed, and more personal.  From the basic white and ecru color motifs, couples have learned to be more bold and creative with their choices in colors, clothing, and quite recently, even the look and feel of the ceremony and reception areas.  Yes, weddings have become more fun and meaningful, yet it has also elevated the costs involved in achieving the desired “themes and motifs”, as wedding organizers would often say.

So how exactly do you plan, organize, and celebrate the perfect dream wedding without breaking the bank?  We researched on this topic and found quite a handful of information from wedding suppliers, organizers, and even brides themselves!  We are sharing everything that we’ve gathered so far and hope these could help you plan the perfect, yet not too expensive, wedding day for you.

  1. Choose the date and time.

According to wedding bloggers, you actually need to decide on the date and time before you even decide on the budget.  A wedding in June could be cheaper than a wedding in December or February since the latter months are considered by most businesses as peak months.

  1. Draft your entourage and guest list.

After you’ve confirmed the date, it is easier to list down the people you wish to be present on your wedding day, including and most importantly, your wedding entourage.  Save up on call toll charges by creating an online group chat or call them through the internet.

  1. Budget. Budget. Budget.

Now that you have a pretty good idea how many people will attend your big day, it is time to work on the wedding budget.  Before deciding how much you intend to spend, you would need to first discuss who will shoulder which expenses.

Filipino wedding traditions are very different from Western culture where the father of the bride shoulders majority, if not all, of the wedding expenses.  Filipino parents seldom shoulder their kids’ weddings unless extremely necessary.  If at all, it is the groom’s parents who share more in the wedding expenses than the bride’s.  Case in point: if you can’t afford your wedding yet, how do you plan to manage a lifelong marriage?

You will have to create a long list of items that need to be purchased, built, and sewn.  Keep in mind too that expenses do not end when you’ve made your way to the altar and exchanged “I dos”.  Your suppliers, drivers, relatives, and other people who will be helping out in your celebration need to be fed, sheltered, and dressed up too.  Prepare your petty cash for incidental expenses that are sure to crop up during the day itself.

  1. Finalize your booking for the ceremony and reception venue.

Weddings are commonly held during the dry months, beginning in December to the early weeks of June.  Top wedding destinations are the cool cities of Tagaytay, Batangas, and Baguio, while more adventurous couples are also keen on celebrating their union by the seashores of La Union, Boracay, Cebu, and Bohol.  The choices are endless and choosing could be fun except you have a budget and guests to consider.  Choose a venue that is not too far from where most of your guests will be coming from.  If you are on a tight budget, we suggest that you hold your ceremony and reception in the same place.  This cuts your expenses on rental fees, decorations, and travel by more than half.

  1. Book your wedding suppliers.

When choosing wedding suppliers, gather as much information from other newlyweds, relatives, and friends as you can.  This gives you first-hand information on the suppliers’ quality of service, negotiable rates, and other important details.  Remember, you do not need to “outsource” everything.  You can borrow, ask for, and create things on your own.  Wedding organizers were non-existent in the ‘80s and ‘90s but are now virtually indispensable.  If they were able to hold grand weddings in the past without the expensive services of a coordinator, why can’t you now?  Ask for your friends’ assistance and delegate assignments to your bride’s maids.  You’d be surprised to find out how much your “squad” wants to be part of your wedding preparations!

If you should spend (or splurge!) on suppliers, you’d be wise to focus on your caterer and photographers.  Your guests will remember your wedding more from the kind and quality of food you served and the candid and wacky photos they will be posting in social media.

And then again, if you have a brother who cooks mean dishes and friends who like to take beautiful photos, you can consider yourself one blessed woman!

  1. Save-the-dates and Wedding Invitations

If you can tap the limitless reach of social media to let everyone know when you’re getting married, use that.  Save-the-date cards add to your expenses and do not do much in ensuring that your guests will show up, so why bother?

While there are hundreds of wedding invitation suppliers who undoubtedly could come up with the most creative invitations for you, remember, you can easily copy a design online and print these yourself!  Invitations end up in people’s waste baskets or filed in a long forgotten shelf anyway, so why spend so much on these stuff?  Take a trip to the bookstore and channel the Martha Stewart in you.  Creating your wedding invitations could also be a good bonding opportunity with your mom, your sisters, and friends.

  1. Buying your wedding apparel.

Divisoria and Baclaran boast of designer quality fabrics that you can send to your trusty seamstress who can create lovely pieces for you and your groom.  If you are paying for your entourage’s gowns, then these two places in Manila are your best bets.  Buying off the rack is convenient but can be too pricey.  Also, expect to lose some weight (or gain some if you’re the type who eats when stressed) after all the stressful wedding preparations so having your gown done by a seamstress will prove to be more convenient when you need some adjustments  done before the big day (because having your gowns altered by designer stores cost money!).

  1. Wedding Permits, Licenses, and Seminars

Now these are the things your wedding suppliers, not even your expensive wedding coordinators, will remind you to accomplish.  Ironically, all your pricey wedding preparations will go to waste if you fail to secure the necessary documents for getting married.

First, you need to secure a Marriage License.  Keep in mind that a marriage license is only valid for 120 days.

Also, secure copies of your PSA birth certificates and CENOMAR (Certificate of No Marriage).  Check your documents for spelling errors and other inaccuracies.

Attend required seminars and retreats (required by either your parish or your municipality) and secure the necessary certifications.  These requirements vary per municipality and parish.

Word of the wise: Accomplish all permits, documents, and seminars yourselves, do not hire the services of fixers no matter how busy you think you are.

  1. Account your expenses

Keep a journal of your expenses and mark off all items that have been paid off and those that will be settled at a later date.  Keep track of your checks, receipts, acknowledgments, and other proofs of payment to avoid confusion and unnecessary expenses.

  1. Hold a pre-wedding gathering of your entourage and suppliers.

It does not have to be fancy; you just need to get them together to ease any tension and encourage coordination.  This is best done a week before the big day.  Include a rehearsal of sorts just to fine tune each person’s responsibility and involvement in the occasion.

Remember, you cannot achieve perfection so leave room for last-minute emergencies and allow your team some errors and oversights.  No matter how hard you prepare, something is bound to go wayward and it’s all part of the fun and excitement.

So enjoy the moment while it lasts.  You will soon realize that preparing for a wedding that lasts for a day pales in comparison to preparing for the marriage that is expected to last a lifetime.

Best wishes!

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

%d bloggers like this: