Tag Archive: PSAHelpline.ph


05 - 15

Aling Nelia is a housewife and a mother of five children.  On her 57th birthday, her kids pooled their resources and surprised her with a round-trip ticket to Hong Kong as it has always been her ardent dream to see the place.

She began working on the required documents while waiting for her passport application appointment at the DFA.  However, when she got hold of her PSA birth certificate, she realized that her name is misspelled on the document.  Her real name, and the name that she has used all her life, is Cornelia Pineda Mangosing, while the name written in her birth certificate is Cornelio Pineda Mangosing.

At first glance, it looked like all Aling Nelia had to do was file a petition for correction of a clerical error on her birth certificate.  After all, it was just one letter – “o” in Cornelio should be changed to “a” to make it Cornelia.  However, when she sought assistance from the Local Civil Registry, she was informed that it is not as simple as it seemed.

What is the difference between correction of clerical error and change of name?

A lot, actually.

Correction of clerical error is covered by R.A. 9048 where an error in a birth certificate is corrected without the need to file a case in court, hire a lawyer, and attend hearings.  The corrections are applied by the LCR where the birth was registered.  RA 9048 may be applied if the error or errors are clearly typhographical in nature – harmless and innocuous.  An evidence of which is that the name, in its erroneous form, sounds ridiculous and tainted with dishonor.

On the other hand, a name that was supposedly misspelled but is still acceptable as a name, may not always be considered misspelled and therefore, may not be covered by the provisions of RA 9048.  Correcting such kinds of entries in a birth certificate follows a different process.

Cornelio vs. Cornelia

Aling Nelia’s name, as far as she is concerned, is misspelled.  Her name is Cornelia, not Cornelio.  Her argument is valid and she has all the documents to prove her claim.  However, the supposed misspelled name, Cornelio, is in itself, a name!  Changing the last letter to make it Cornelia would mean just that – changing the name – not merely correcting the spelling.

What should be done then?

Aling Nelia may resort to have the correction applied through a judicial proceeding.  She needs to file a verified petition in the Regional Trial Court of her birth place or where the LCR is located.  The rest of the procedures she needs to follow are outlined in Rule 108 of the Rules of Court in order to apply the necessary “correction”.  This may be better explained to her by a lawyer.

It may seem strange to have to go through a rather complicated process when all Aling Nelia wanted was to set her records straight and align the name on her birth certificate with the name that she had been using all her life.  At this point, she actually has two options: she could have her name changed through a court proceeding, or simply adopt “Cornelio” being the registered name and drop “Cornelia”.  The latter, of course, would be a ridiculous choice.

This is another reminder for all of us to always be careful when accomplishing public documents such as Certificates of Live Birth, Marriage Certificates, and Death Certificates.  An honest mistake may lead to a string of complications that may affect important transactions such as passport applications and benefit claims.

If you have questions regarding your birth certificate or think that there might be an error you need to rectify, proceed to the LCR office where your birth was registered.  You may also drop us a line and we will do our best to find the most accurate answers for you.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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04 - 18

Filipinos like using nicknames.  We give our children unique sounding names such as ‘Jun-Jun’, ‘Ken-Ken’, and ‘Mac-Mac’.  Girls are named ‘Ging-Ging’, ‘Che-Che’, and sometimes, ‘Pot-Pot’.  Every family has a Tito Boy and a Tita Baby, a Kuya Boyet and an Ate Mayet, a Tito Tito or a Tita Tita.  Very seldom are we called by our real names.  When our parents call us by our complete names, we know we are in serious trouble.

While nicknames are fun and easy to remember, it has also caused problems for some.  Are there limitations to one’s use of his aliases?  When is it unlawful to use your nickname in public?  Did you know that there a lot of laws that touch on the use of nicknames and aliases?

Here is a list of Philippine laws that deal with an individual’s use of nicknames and aliases.  It pays to be properly informed because ignorance of the law excuses no one.  Don’t let your nickname get you in serious trouble.

What is a nickname or alias?

These are names we use publicly and habitually apart from our real names registered at birth or during baptism.  Any other name or names used by a person to distinguish himself other than his given name is called an alias (or aliases if the person has several).

Are nicknames or aliases allowed by law?

While Filipinos are not prohibited from using nicknames, there is a law that regulates the use of names other than one’s given name.  Commonwealth Act No. 142 (an Act to Regulate the Use of Aliases) was primarily intended to discourage the common practice among Chinese nationals who use different names and aliases in their business transactions.

Is the use of an alias in a business transaction or a public document automatically considered unlawful?

No.  Under the said Commonwealth Act, the use of a nickname or alias in a single instance without any indication that the user intends to be known by this name in addition to his real name does not fall within the prohibition.

The use of a nickname becomes illegal when it is meant to conceal or mislead, as detailed in the following laws involving false names and identities:

  1. The Anti-money Laundering Act of 2002 (Republic Act No. 9160, as amended), which requires banks and other covered institutions to establish and record the true identity of their clients based on official documents.
  2. The Revised Penal Code which penalizes the public use of a fictitious name for the purpose of concealing a crime or evading the execution of a judgment.
  3. The Civil Code of the Philippines which prohibits the use of different names and surnames, except for pen and stage names (usually observed among celebrities, authors, and the like).
  4. The Philippine Immigration Act of 1940 which penalizes any individual who shall evade the Immigration Laws by appearing under an assumed or fictitious name.
  5. The Tax Reform Act of 1997 which made it unlawful for any person to enter any false or fictitious name in a taxpayer’s books of accounts or records.
  6. Presidential Decree No. 1829 which penalizes any person who shall obstruct, impede, frustrate, or delay the apprehension of suspects by publicly using a fictitious name for the purpose of concealing a crime.
  7. Commonwealth Act 142 which penalizes any person who shall use any name different from the one with which he was registered at birth in the office of the local civil registry.

Nicknames and aliases is also one of the most common reasons why most Filipinos encounter problems with their birth certificates. By habitually using nicknames on public documents, they end up being listed under these aliases, contradicting the names written on their birth certificates.  This becomes a problem when the person applies for a passport, a license, or even when getting married.

Think twice before deciding to write your nickname on a public document.  Be careful you do not bring yourself unnecessary trouble by using a name you have been called since you were a kid.  Always choose to write your full name as written on your birth certificate.

Source: http://jlp-law.com/blog/when-the-use-of-aliases-violates-the-law/

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04 - 11

Joy gave birth to her eldest daughter before she turned 17 years old.  Since she was too young to care for her infant, her parents decided to claim Joy’s daughter as their own.  The baby was named Mia and Joy’s parents were listed as the baby’s parents in her birth certificate.

Ten years later, Joy married Mia’s biological father.  A few months into their marriage, both decided that it is time they took over the parental responsibilities for their one and only child.  This includes changing Mia’s last name to the last name of her biological father.  A lawyer friend explained that in order to achieve this, they need to adopt Mia.

Why do you need to adopt your own child?

Mia’s parents could have just easily filed for her Legitimation after they got married however, since Mia’s birth certificate shows her grandparents as her parents, they now need to adopt Mia so she can be legally recognized as their child.

What is the process of adopting your own child?

  1. The husband and wife must file a joint petition for adoption of Mia, with respect to Section 7 of R.A. 8552.  This must be filed at the Family Court of the province or city where the adopting parties reside.
  2. The petition should include the couple’s application for the change of surname of Mia.  Since Mia is already 16 years old at the time of adoption, her consent on the adoption is also needed.  She should be made aware that should she agree to the adoption, her last name will change to that of her biological father’s and custody will be transferred to her biological parents.

How will this kind of adoption be treated by the Family Court?

There are three kinds of adoption in the Philippines:

  1. Agency Adoptions – a licensed adoption agency finds and develops adoptive families for children under their care.
  2. Family or Relative Adoptions – where biological parents make a direct placement of the child to a relative.
  3. Private or Independent Adoptions – either a direct placement to a family known by the child’s biological parents or through the use of an intermediary or a go-between.

Mia’s adoption falls under Family or Relative Adoptions since her grandparents stood as her biological parents.  Take note that this could pose an issue in court as the grandparents might be accused of falsifying the child’s birth documents (listing themselves as Mia’s parents), but that is a separate matter that can be tackled in a different article later on.

What will be the effect of this kind of adoption?

  1. Mia’s legal ties with her grandparents (standing as her parents) will be severed.  They shall now assume the roles of grandparents to Mia and that is something they can deal with as a family.
  2. She will now be treated as a legitimate child of her adopters (who are actually her biological parents).
  3. Mia and her biological parents now have reciprocal rights and obligations arising from the relationship of parent and child, including but not limited to:
    • The right of the adopter to choose the name the child is to be known;
    • The right of the adopter and adoptee to be legal and compulsory heirs of each other.

Joy and her husband’s petition for adoption was granted by the Family Court.  It took a while before Mia got used to her new living arrangement and still opts to spend her weekends with her grandparents.  Mia’s inheritance, as stated in her grandparents’ will, remained intact in spite of the changes in her name and legitimacy.

So yes, you can adopt your own child.  It all depends on the events surrounding your circumstances and, up to a certain degree, your lawyer’s skill in convincing the Family Court that your petition merits approval.

Reference: http://www.gov.ph/2002/07/31/rule-on-adoption/

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04 - 06 (1)

When a person changes his name, whether due to marriage, adoption, or corrections on birth certificate entries, the rest of his identification documents, such as passports, should also be updated.  Here is a list of name amendments allowed by Philippine laws and the specific requirements when applying for a new or renewed passport due to change in name.

  1. Change of name due to marriage.
  2. Change of surname of a legitimated child by virtue of a subsequent marriage of parents.
  3. Change of name due to adoption.
  4. Change of name due to death of spouse or annulment of marriage.
  5. Change of name due to divorce (valid only for those Filipinos who did not act as Plaintiff in the divorce proceedings, i.e. the Filipino spouse did not initiate the divorce proceedings; not valid for couples who were both Filipinos at the time of the marriage).
  6. Change of name as duly ordered by Philippine courts or the Civil Registrar General.

General Requirements

  1. Duly accomplished passport application form, typed or printed legibly in black or blue ink.
  2. Latest original passport and one photocopy of data page of passport (original will be returned).
  3. Proof that applicant has not applied for foreign citizenship, e.g. resident alien card.

Requirements for Change of Name DUE TO MARRIAGE:

  1. If marriage was solemnized in the Philippines, bring your PSA certified original copy and one photocopy or marriage certificate.  The original copy is for verification only and will be returned to the applicant. Applicant may order a copy of the PSA Marriage Certificate online at www.psahelpline.ph.  Copies will be delivered to their address.
  2. Original and one photocopy of marriage certificate The original copy is for verification only and will be returned to the applicant. Applicant may order a copy of the PSA Marriage Certificate online at www.psahelpline.ph.  Copies will be delivered to their address.
  3. If marriage was solemnized abroad, bring a duly accomplished Report of Marriage Contracted Abroad form.

Requirements for Change of Name DUE TO DEATH OF HUSBAND, DIVORCE, ANNULLED MARRIAGES:

  1. For widowed applicants, authenticated death certificate of husband, authenticated court order of presumptive death.
  2. If marriage was annulled, PSA Marriage Certificate, with annotation reflecting the annulment of marriage.  Applicant may have a copy delivered by ordering online at www.psahelpline.ph.
  3. If applicant is divorced, submit an original and one photocopy of Divorce Decree (original will be returned).
  4. Number 3 is applicable only when the applicant is the Filipino spouse; if both parties were Filipino citizens at the time of marriage, this will not apply.

Requirement for change of name DUE TO LEGITIMATION UPON SUBSEQUENT MARRIAGE OF PARENTS (or as ordered by Philippine courts or by the Civil Registrar General):

Requirement for change of name DUE TO ADOPTION:

Changes in name allowed under Republic Act 9048:

These are changes in name entries that did not have to undergo a judicial order:

  • Correction of clerical or typographical errors in any entry in civil registry documents, except corrections involving the change in sex, age, nationality, and civil status of a person.
  • Change of a person’s first name in his/her civil registry document under certain grounds specified under the law through administrative process.

Requirement:

Source:

www.gov.ph

www.dfa.gov.ph

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04 - 03

When a married couple separates, whether on their own terms or as prescribed by an annulment proceeding, child custody and support become a fundamental issue between the parties.  With whom should the children stay?  How often can their father / mother see them?  How will their basic needs be met?

In the Philippines, custody of children under seven years old is automatically granted to the mother as mandated by Article 213 of the Family Code.  This is applicable whether the child’s birthright is legitimate or illegitimate.  In the same manner, the father is expected to continue providing the needs of his children and not leave the mother to fend for the family on her own.

This arrangement is easier said than done as most post-annulment / separation issues stem from the fact that fathers fail to consistently provide for their children.  Each has his own reason for not being able to live up to what is expected of him (as the provider); others admit that they chose to discontinue financially supporting their children through the estranged wife because of trust issues.

In the midst of these marital (and extra-marital) issues are the children and their escalating living necessities.  This blog receives a lot of questions about child support and legal actions against fathers who fail to provide for their children.  We all have that one friend who is perpetually asking about means to compel her ex-husband to give and give more as the children’s basic needs rapidly become anything but basic.

We ran a research on child support, as dictated by Philippine laws, in an attempt to shed light in this touchy issue.  We hope these information help put your questions on child support to rest, or at least lead you towards the right decisions in upholding the rights of your children.

How much should a father give as financial support to his children?

According to the Family Code (Articles 194, 201, and 202):

Support comprises everything indispensable for sustenance, dwelling, clothing, medical attendance, education and transportation, in keeping with the financial capacity of the family.

The education of the person entitled to be supported referred to in the preceding paragraph shall include his schooling or training for some profession, trade, or vocation, even beyond the age of majority.  Transportation shall include expenses in going to and from school, or to and from place of work.

The amount of support, in the cases referred to in Articles 195 and 196, shall be in proportion to the resources or means of the giver and to the necessities of the recipient.

Support in the cases referred to in the preceding article shall be reduced or increased proportionately, according to the reduction or increase of the necessities of the recipient and the resources or means of the person obliged to furnish the same.

According to the Family Code:

  • The amount of support shall be based on the children’s needs and the father’s capacity to provide (earn).
  • The father is obligated to support his children’s education even after they have reached the age of emancipation.

Can I demand for support from my child’s father even if he is married to another woman (and my child, effectively, is illegitimate)?

Article 195 of the Family Code provides that both legitimate and illegitimate children have the right to receive financial support from their parents.  However, an illegitimate child’s right to support shall only arise if he was duly recognized by his father.

An illegitimate child may prove that he is recognized by his biological father through the following:

  1. Record of birth appearing in the civil register or a final judgment – with the father accomplishing the Affidavit of Acknowledgment / Admission of Paternity found at the back of his birth certificate.
  2. An admission of illegitimate filiation in a public document or a private handwritten instrument and signed by the parent concerned.

If the father refuses to recognize the child, the mother may seek to the court’s assistance by filing a Petition for Compulsory Recognition and Support.  This will entail hearings and other court proceedings and the mother must be prepared to fight it out in public.

If I win the petition, can I demand the father of my child to reimburse the expenses I incurred in the years that he did not provide for my child?

No; the father’s obligation to financially support the child begins from the date of judicial demand, or once the Petition for Compulsory Recognition and Support is approved by the court.

Do I have the right to demand for financial support from my ex-husband even if he is jobless?

In cases when the children’s father is jobless and has no means of income, financial support may be derived from the separate properties.  If the father does not have a separate property to liquidate, the funds may be taken from his and the children’s mother’s conjugal properties.  It shall be treated as an advance and will be deducted from the ex-husband’s share of the estate when it is liquidated.

Can I sue my ex-husband if he continues to ignore his parental responsibilities?

Filing a case in court to compel the children’s father to continue his obligation to provide for the children should be the last resort.  Yes, a mother can seek the court’s assistance in demanding for child support.  A father’s failure to comply with his obligation despite repeated reminders is a violation of RA 7610 (Special Protection of Children Against Abuse, Exploitation, and Discrimination Act, or RA 9262 – Anti-Violence Against Women and Their Children Act of 2004) and is a criminal offense.

Sources:

www.gov.ph

http://jlp-law.com

http://www.manilatimes.net

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03 - 31 (1)

Margaret is 13 years old and is about to secure her very first passport.  It would have been a breeze to accomplish this errand if not for Margaret’s living arrangement that is quite complicated.

Margaret’s parents separated before she turned 7 years old.  Her mother went back home to her province in Dumaguete; Margaret was left with her father who was then working as a nurse in Manila.  Not long after the separation, her father met another woman who would later assume the role of Margaret’s mom.  By the time Margaret turned 9 years old, her father’s girlfriend has moved in with them and has since been taking care of Margaret like she was her own daughter.

Her father is now based in London with a successful career as a dialysis nurse.  He wants for his girlfriend and Margaret to come visit him this summer.  While Margaret is all set to begin her passport application process, her father’s girlfriend is a bit worried that she might not be able to produce the documents required by the DFA.

What are the general requirements for minors applying for a passport?

The requirements vary depending on the child’s birthright and if she is traveling on her own, with her parents, or a guardian.

General Requirements:

  1. Confirmed appointment
  2. Personal appearance of minor
  3. Personal appearance of parent
  4. PSA birth certificate
  5. School ID or Form 137 of minor applicant
  6. PSA marriage certificate of minor applicant’s parents.
  7. Affidavit of support and consent to travel (from parent).
  8. Valid passport of the person traveling with the minor.
  9. Parents’ valid passport or identification documents.

If the child is not traveling with either parent or alone:

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. DSWD clearance

If both parents are abroad:

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. Special power of attorney (with an attached photocopy of either parent’s valid passport authorizing a representative in assisting the child to apply for a passport.  If minor is illegitimate, mother should execute the SPA).

If minor is legitimated by subsequent marriage of parents.

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. PSA birth certificate of the minor and must include the annotation regarding new status as legitimated and the full name of the child.

If minor is illegitimate but acknowledged by father.

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. PSA birth certificate of the minor reflecting surname of father with Affidavit of Acknowledgment and Consent to use the surname of the father.

If minor is legally adopted

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. PSA birth certificate
    • Original and certified true copy of PSA birth certificate before adoption.
    • Original and certified true copy of PSA amended birth certificate after adoption.
  3. DSWD clearance
    • If traveling with a person other than the adopting parents.
  4. Certified True Copy of the Court Decision of Order on Adoption and Certificate of Finality must also be complied.

If minor’s parents are annulled / divorced

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. PSA marriage certificate of parents with annotation on nullity or annulment decree.
  3. DSWD clearance

If minor’s mother is likewise a minor

  1. All of the General Requirements and
  2. Personal appearance of mother and maternal grandparents.
  3. PSA birth certificate of minor applicant and mother.
  4. Affidavit of Support and Consent executed by the maternal grandparents indicating the name of the traveling companion.
  5. DSWD clearance if traveling with a person other than the maternal grandparents.
  6. Proof of identity of mother and maternal grandparents.

Minors 12 months and below are no longer required to seek an appointment with the DFA.

Apart from producing all the basic documentary requirements, Margaret’s father had to contact her mother and request her to accompany Margaret to the DFA.  This made Margaret’s passport application a lot easier than if she were accompanied by her father’s girlfriend.

Applying for a minor child’s passport could get complicated if you are not armed with the necessary documents beforehand.  We hope this list helps clear out the questions that most parents have regarding their children’s passport applications and renewals.

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03 - 29

Ang PSA Birth Certificate (dating NSO Birth Certificate) ay madalas na kasama sa listahan ng mga primary documentary requirements ng iba’t-ibang establishments tulad ng mga bangko, eskwelahan, at mga government agencies.  Ang birth certificate ay naka-print sa Security Paper (SECPA) at may selyo ng PSA sa upper left-hand corner ng dokumento.  Maaari itong makuha mula sa mga opisina ng PSA o ipa-deliver sa inyong bahay sa pamamagitan ng pag-order online o pagtawag sa hotline (02 – 737 – 1111).

Habang may mga taong nakakatanggap ng kopya ng kanilang PSA birth certificate, meron din naman na ang natatanggap na kopya ay iyong tinatawag na Negative Certification.  Ang ibig sabihin nito ay walang kopya ang PSA ng kanilang birth certificate.

Bakit Negative Certification ang natanggap ko mula sa PSA?

Ang dalawang dahilan kung bakit may mga nakakatanggap ng Negative Certification mula sa PSA ay:

  • Hindi pa naka rehistro ang kapanganakan ng taong nag request ng birth certificate.
  • Hindi pa nai-submit ng Local Civil Registry ang kopya ng birth certificate sa PSA.

Ano ang dapat kong gawin kapag nakatanggap ako ng Negative Certification?

Nakababahalang matuklasan na walang kopya ang PSA ng iyong birth certificate ngunit may paraan para maayos ito.

May kopya ang LCR ngunit walang kopya ang PSA.

Unahin mong alamin mula sa Local Civil Registry ng lugar kung saan ka ipinanganak kung meron silang record ng iyong kapanganakan.  Kadalasan ay merong naka file ngunit hindi nai-forward sa PSA para ma-certify.  Kung makukumpirma ng LCR na meron ka ngang birth certificate sa files nila, ito ang dapat mong gawin:

  1. Manghingi ng form sa LCR para makapag request ng Endorsement of Records.
  2. Bayaran ang courier fees sa Cashier at ipakita sa LCR ang iyong resibo.  Itago ang resibo bilang katibayan ng iyong filed transaction at binayarang courier fee.
  3. Pagkalipas ng isang linggo, maaari nang mag follow-up sa PSA Sta. Mesa office.  Dalhin ang resibo ng binayarang courier fee sa LCR para mas mabilis na ma-trace ang iyong transaction.

Ang unang kopya ng iyong pina-endorse na dokumento ay sa PSA Sta. Mesa makukuha.  Ang mga susunod na request ng kopya ng iyong PSA birth certificate ay maaari nang ma-order online o sa pagtawag sa PSAHelpline hotline na 02 – 737 -1111.

Walang naka-file na rehistro ng kapanganakan sa LCR.

Kung walang record ng iyong birth certificate na mahahanap ang LCR, ibig sabihin ay hindi narehistro ang iyong kapanganakan.  Wala ka talagang birth certificate at kailangan mong mag file ng Late Registration of Birth.

Maaari itong i-file sa munisipyo ng bayan kung saan ka ipinanganak.  Sakaling sa ibang bayan ka na nakatira, maaari ka na ring mag file sa LCR kung saan ka kasalukuyang naninirahan (Out-of-town Late Registration).

Ano ang requirements para makapag file ng Late Registration of Birth?

  1. Kung less than 18 years old:
    • Apat (4) na kopya ng Certificate of Live Birth na may kumpletong detalye at pirmado ng mga concerned parties.
    • Punuan din ng hinihinging detalye ang Affidavit of Delayed Registration sa likod ng Certificate of Live Birth.  Ang mga impormasyon dito ay magmumula sa ama, ina, o guardian ng may ari ng birth certificate, tulad ng:
      • Pangalan ng bata;
      • Petsa at lugar ng kapanganakan;
      • Pangalan ng ama ng bata kung ito ay illegitimate at kinikilala ng ama;
      • Kung legitimate ang bata, isulat ang petsa at lugar kung saan ikinasal ang mga magulang;
      • Isulat ang dahilan kung bakit hindi na-rehistro ang bata sa loob ng tatlumpung (30) araw mula sa petsa ng kanyang kapanganakan.
  2. Kung 18 years old and above:

Improtanteng ma-kumpirma mo muna na wala ka talagang birth records sa LCR ng iyong birthplace para maiwasan ang tinatawag na Double Registration.  Nangyayari ito kung meron nang birth registration ang isang tao at pagkalipas ng ilang taon ay nagpa-rehistro siyang muli sa ibang munisipyo.  Kung ito ang mangyayari, ang records na susundin ng LCR ay iyong unang registration; ito rin ang record na ipadadala sa PSA for certification.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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02-20

While we anticipate the approval of the proposed 10-year validity of Philippine passports, we should continue to mark our calendars as to when we should be applying for a passport renewal.  Currently, Philippine passports have a 5-year validity period and most passengers who have less than a year before their passports expire are no longer permitted to leave the country.

This is a dilemma encountered by most OFWs.

So what happens if your passport expires while you are overseas?

Read on:

1.Allow a one year renewal period.

Avoid waiting until you only have a few weeks left before your passport expires.  The process of renewing your passport from abroad takes at least 8 to 12 weeks.

2. Visit the Philippine Embassy / Consulate General in the country where you are currently located.

a. Bring your passport and other pertinent documents related to your travel or stay.

b. The Philippine Embassy will send your renewal application to the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) office in Manila.

c. Check online if the Philippine Embassy in your area requires applicants to set up an appointment.  Most Philippine Embassies accommodate walk-in applications for passport renewal.

d. All details such as photographs, fingerprints, and signatures will be taken on-site.

3. What are the documents you need to bring?

a. Duly accomplished passport application form, typed or printed legibly on black or blue ink.

b. Latest passport.

c. One (1) photocopy of each of the data page/s of the passport.

d. Photocopy of any valid identification card where the middle name is fully spelled out, such as state4 ID, driver’s license, Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate, or Baptismal Certificate.

e. Proof that applicant has not applied for foreign citizenship, e.g. resident alien card (green card).

These requirements may vary depending on the host country of the Philippine Embassy you will be applying to.

4. But how about if the passport IS already expired?

If your passport got lost or is already expired and you need to travel back to the Philippines, you have to secure a Travel Document from the Philippine Embassy in your host country.

What is a Travel Document?

  • Travel documents are issued to Philippine nationals returning to the Philippines, who for one reason or another, have lost their passport or cannot be issued a regular passport.
  • It is also issued to Filipino citizens who are being sent back to the Philippines.
  • It is valid for a non-extendable period of thirty (30) days from date of issuance and only for a one-way direct travel to the Philippines.  It cannot be used for re-entry to the host country.

The travel Document can only be issued when:

  • The consular officer determines that its use is warranted by emergency/critical circumstances.
  • It cannot be used as a short cut in complying with the requirements for the renewal of a passport or the replacement of a lost passport.

Renewing your Philippine passport abroad may be the last thing you would want to do while on a trip, whether as a tourist or an overseas worker.  You can avoid this by simply making sure that your passport is kept up-to-date.  Until the law on the 10-year validity period for Philippine Passports has been ratified, we all need to exert a little more effort in making sure that our passports are updated and are not expiring anytime soon.

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/2013-04-04-07-00-36

http://bangkokpe.dfa.gov.ph/consular-office/services/passport/travel-document

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/philippines-dc/consular-services-dc/faq-dc/

http://www.pinoyhood.com/renew-passport-abroad/

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02-16

A common requirement when travelling abroad are DFA-authenticated IDs and documents.  Whether you are traveling as a tourist, an overseas worker, or an exchange student, you will be required to have certain supporting documents “red-ribboned” by the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Here is a summary of the processes and requirements involved when having your documents authenticated.  Certain agencies handle the submission of the documents for authentication to the DFA.  For easier reference, we separated the documents that need to be hand-carried by the applicant to the DFA and those that will be handled by the agency.

General Procedure:

Step 1: Fill out an application form.

Step 2: Present a valid ID upon submission of the documents to the Processing Window.

Step 3: Pay appropriate Authentication Fees:

a. Php 100 / document (4 days processing)

b. Php 200 / document (1 day processing)

Step 4: Return the Duplicate copy of the receipt to the Processing Window.

Step 5: Claim the Authenticated document on the release date; simply present the machine-validated receipt at the releasing window.

Requirements for Authentication of Documents: APPLICANTS TO HAND-CARRY THESE DOCUMENTS TO THE DFA

  1. Birth / Marriage / Death Certificate and Certificate of No Marriage (CENOMAR).
    • Certificates must be in Security Paper issued by the PSA or must have been certified / authenticated by the PSA.
    • Local Civl Regsitrar (LCR) copy of Marriage Certificate, Birth Certificate, or Death Certificate may be required in cases when entries on the PSA copy are unreadable.
  2. Transcript of Records (TOR) and Diploma (For State Colleges and Universities)
    • Certified True Copies from the school
    • Secure Certificate of Authentication and Verification (CAV) from the school signed by the School/University Registrar.
  3. Form 137 and Diploma (High School and Elementary Level)
    • Certified True Copies from the school
    • School Principal’s Certification
    • Division Superintendent’s endorsement to Dep-Ed Regional Office
    • Certification (CAV) from Dep-Ed Regional Office
  4. Certificate of Employment / Trainings / Seminars, Baptismal Certificate and other documents issued by a private entity.
    • Applicant must first secure an affidavit, stating necessary factual circumstances and indicating certificates as annex or attachment.
    • Affidavit must be notarized.
    • Applicant must secure Certificate of Authority for a Notarial Act (CANA) signed by the Executive Judge or Vice Executive Judge from the Regional Trial Court which issued the commission of the Notary Public. (Copy of Notarial Commission is not the same as Certificate of Authority for a Notarial Act).
  5. Other Notarized Documents (Special Powers of Attorney (SPA) / Affidavit of Consent / Invitation / Guarantee / MOA, etc.)
    • After document is notarized, applicant must secure Certificate of Authority for a Notarial Act (CANA) signed by the Executive Judge or Vice Executive Judge from the Regional Trial Court which issued the commission of the Notary Public.
  6. Court Decisions / Resolutions / Orders
    • Applicant must present certified true copies of the decision, resolution, or order.
    • Applicant must secure copy of specimen signature of the court personnel who signed the certified copies from the Office of Administrative Services (Supreme Court – located beside PGH).
    • Applicant may be required to submit annotated marriage certificate in cases regarding decision of finality of annulment.
  7. Immigration Records
    • Certified / Authenticated by the Bureau of Immigration (BI).
  8. DSWD Clearances
    • Travel Clearances for minors directly issued by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD).
  9. NBI Clearances
    • NBI Clearances for travel abroad must be issued by the National Bureau of Investigation (Green).
  10. Police Clearances
    • Police Clearance signed by the Chief of Police issued by the Philippine National Police in various police stations nationwide, usually by the police precinct which has jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence or applicant may opt to secure police certification from Camp Crame.
  11. Barangay Clearances
    • Clearances issued by the barangay which has jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence and must have been authenticated by the office of the Mayor which has jurisdiction over the barangay.
  12. Export Documents
    • Must be authenticated by the Philippine Chamber of Commerce (PCCI), the Department of Health (DOH), Department of Agriculture (DA), or by the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD), depending on the nature of the document
  13. Business Registration and Other Documents issued by a Government Agency (e.g. SEC, DTI, BIR, Municipal Business Permit and Licensing Office, etc.)
    • Secure certified true copy from the issuing office.
  14. Foreign Documents
    • A Philippine Embassy or Philippine Consulate General in the country from where the document originated or by the said country’s Embassy or Consulate General based in the Philippines must have authenticated these documents.

Requirements for Authentication of Documents: SUBMISSION OF DOCUMENTS TO DFA IS HANDLED BY THE GOVERNMENT AGENCY

The applicant will be issued a claim stub which he needs to bring to the DFA when claiming his authenticated document.

  1. Transcript of Records (TOR) and Diploma (Collegiate Level)
    • Certified True Copies from the school.
    • Secure Certificate of Authentication and Verification (CAV) from the Commission on Higher Education (CHED).
  2. Transcript of Records (TOR) and Diploma (Technical or Vocational Courses)
    • Certified True Copies from the school
    • Secure Certificate of Authentication and Verification (CAV) from Technical Education and Skills Development Authority or TESDA.
  3. Medical / AIDS Free Certificate
    • Authenticated by the Department of Health (DOH) and applicable only for use to the following countries:
      • Spain
      • Palau
      • Libya
      • Oman
      • Cuba
      • Portugal
      • Greece
      • Cyprus
      • Angola
  4. Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP) issued licenses.
    • Authenticated by CAAP
  5. Driver’s Licenses
    • Applicant must first secure certification from Land Transportation Office (LTO Main Branch only).
  6. Professional Licenses / Board Certificates / Board Ratings / Certifications
    • Certified True Copies must be authenticated by  Professional Regulations Commission (PRC).

All unclaimed authenticated documents will be disposed of by the DFA after three months so make sure to claim your documents on the date reflected on your claim stub.

Source: http://dfa.gov.ph/procedures

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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02-13

The DFA will always refer to the authenticated copy of our PSA birth certificate for the accuracy and completeness of our names.  The name, and how it is written, on the birth certificate is what will appear on the passport.

Miguel Oben is an illegitimate child.  He has always used his mother’s last name as his surname (Oben); he leaves the middle name field blank in all of his documents and IDs.  When he applied for a passport, he was required to present a copy of his PSA birth certificate.  He was shocked to find that his name on his birth certificate is Miguel Villanueva Oben – Villanueva being his biological father’s last name!  He verified this against the copy of the LCR where his birth was registered and got the same results.  When he presented his birth certificate to the DFA, his passport application was denied.

What must be done in such cases?

Miguel was left with no choice but to have the issue on his birth certificate rectified at the Local Civil Registry where his birth was registered.  Since he is an illegitimate child and his father’s name does not appear on his birth certificate (except for his last name that somehow found its way to Miguel’s middle name field), he should continue carrying his mother’s last name while the middle name field must be left blank.

While waiting for the results from the Local Civil Registry (which could take between 6 months to a year), Miguel tried appealing his case to the DFA.  It turns out that he needs the passport to visit his mother who suffered a stroke in Guam, USA.  Luckily, he was able to support this claim with documents from his mother’s doctors.

Although it is not customary for the DFA to work around identity and documentary issues of passport applicants, there are certain cases when the application is reconsidered and additional documents are required.  Cases similar to Miguel’s may be required to present an Affidavit of One and The Same Person in support of the IDs and documents he presented bearing his name as Miguel Oben.  Apart from the said Affidavit, Miguel also attached a signed letter to the DFA stating that he shall be presenting the annotated copy of his birth certificate upon renewal of his passport.

Again, these kinds of issues are handled and evaluated by the DFA on a case-to-case basis.  The results of the evaluation are entirely up to the discretion of DFA’s experts.  At the end of the day, the public is expected to adhere to the policies of the DFA as published in their website and as posted in their offices.

Source: www.dfa.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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