Tag Archive: birth certificates


July 10

I always thought that if a child is born out of wedlock, the baby automatically carries its mother’s maiden last name (while his middle name is left blank, otherwise, the baby and the mom will appear to be siblings).  Only when the baby’s parents marry will the child have the legal right to adopt the father’s last name.

Apparently, this is not always the case.  Some children are able to carry their father’s last name on their birth certificate even if their parents are not yet married.

How is this possible?

Citizen Services’ Bright Baby has the answer. Click this link!

June 19 (1)

It is that time of the year when dengue mosquitoes seem to be more active in hunting their prey.  Young and old alike can fall victim to these pesky insects that carry the deadly dengue virus.  It is no secret why emergency rooms are never without a patient exhibiting the early signs of dengue fever.

Does PhilHealth cover dengue fever cases?

Yes.  That is why it is important that you keep your PhilHealth account updated because you never know when serious illnesses might attack.

PhilHealth’s coverage for dengue fever is based on the severity of the patient’s case.  There are simple cases of dengue and there are those that are listed as severe.  PhilHealth coverage will always be based on the attending physician’s final diagnosis.  Below is the list of case rates for dengue fever:

DESCRIPTION

CASE RATE PROFESSIONAL FEE

HEALTH CARE INSTITUTION FEE

Dengue without warning signs: Dengue fever (DF) Dengue hemorrhagic fever Grades 1 and 2; Dengue hemorrhagic fever without warning signs. 10,000.00 3,000.00 7,000.00
Dengue with warning signs; Dengue hemorrhagic fever with warning signs. 10,000.00 3,000.00 7,000.00
Severe Dengue; Severe Dengue Fever; Severe Dengue hemorrhagic fever. 16,000.00 4,800.00 11,200.00

To avoid inconvenience and delays in your claims, make sure that your PhilHealth contributions are updated every month.  You never know when diseases may strike and your only assurance of financial assistance during times of emergency is a flawless record with PhilHealth.

Keep your homes and yards dengue-free and make sure that your children are protected against mosquito bites while they are in school or at play.

If you have questions about PhilHealth, send us an email and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source: www.philhealth.gov.ph

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May 03 - 1

In a previous article, we featured the guidelines on how you can be sure that you are eligible to claim your PhilHealth benefits after you have been confined and treated in a hospital.  There are cases, however, when even a qualified PhilHealth member is not able to fully enjoy his privileges in spite of showing sufficient proof that he or she must be afforded his PhilHealth benefits.  Sadly though, the causes of these issues are often due to the medical facility’s negligence and refusal to abide by the policies set by PhilHealth for its affiliated clinics and hospitals.

To help you maximize your PhilHealth benefits, here are four important tips you need to know when applying your privileges as a PhilHealth member:

  • PhilHealth does not refund benefits directly to members.

This means that the hospital or clinic must deduct the amount of PhilHealth’s participation in your treatment, from your total hospital bill.  The benefits may not be converted to cash that the hospital “pays” to the patient.

  • The PhilHealth benefit must be applied AFTER other tax deductions, including the Senior Citizen discount.

The Senior Citizen discount and Value-added Tax (VAT) are different from PhilHealth benefits.  If the patient is a Senior Citizen, the SC and VAT must first be deducted from his total hospital bill, before his PhilHealth benefits are applied.

This computation is applicable only if the No Balance Billing was not applied to the patient’s case.

  • 3 Must-have documents when claiming your PhilHealth benefits:
    • PhilHealth Claim Form 1 (CF1)
    • Member Data Record (MDR)
    • Contributions Record
  • PhilHealth members with complete documents must not be made to pay the hospital bill in full.

Some health institutions make the patient pay the full hospital bill with the promise of refunding them their PhilHealth benefits after they have received the funds from PhilHealth.

This is not how PhilHealth benefits are disbursed to members.

Should the hospital demand that you pay the bill in full, even after you have satisfied all requirements for the application of your PhilHealth benefits, report them right away to PhilHealth.  Most hospitals have PhilHealth helpdesks in its premises; you may also call the PhilHealth call center at 02-441-7442.

Reference: www.philhealth.gov.ph

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Feb 20 (1)

Mang Roy was a famous farmer in their barrio.  His success story, from being a humble tenant who plants and harvests for landlords, to being one of the wealthiest landowners and supplier of root crops, fruits, and vegetables in their province, is well-known in their barangay.  When he retired from farming at the age of 62, he has successfully established his family’s properties and remained to be the largest supplier of milled rice in their region.

Sadly though, Mang Roy passed away shortly after handing over the operations of their farms to his eldest daughter. After his death, his family decided to subdivide part of Mang Roy’s farmland, the areas that he set apart for his children’s inheritance.

Through the help of a lawyer, the documents needed to transfer the land’s titles to Mang Roy’s children were filed at the Registry of Deeds.  Everything went smoothly until the ROD required the children to submit a copy of Mang Roy’s birth certificate.

His wife requested for a copy at the Philippine Statistics Authority although, at the back of her mind, she knows that she has never seen a copy of her husband’s birth certificate.  She recalls him saying once that he doesn’t have a birth certificate.

True enough, their request returned void; they were instead handed a negative certificate – meaning, Mang Roy’s birth is not registered.  When they inquired how they can get a copy of Mang Roy’s birth certificate, they were advised to apply for a late registration of birth at the LCR in Mang Roy’s birthplace.

Late registration of birth happens when a child remains unregistered at the Local Civil Registry of his birthplace for more than 30 days after his birth.  For various reasons, parents fail to report their child’s birth to the municipal hall and as a result, these children grow up without a record of their birth.  Not having a birth certificate is not a complicated matter since all you have to do is submit the person’s information for proper registration.  It becomes complicated when the person you wish to register is already dead.

Although the requirements for late registration are pretty simple (an original copy of your Baptismal Certificate and a Certified True Copy of the person’s Marriage Certificate), these may prove to be inutile since the person who needs to be registered is already dead.  However, without Mang Roy’s birth certificate, his children may not be granted their inheritance.

Their family lawyer advised them to execute a Joint Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons – an attestation from two individuals who are not related to Mang Roy’s family but are fully aware of Mang Roy’s identity and roots.  This affidavit shall support the details of Mang Roy’s birth date and birthplace.  This, together with the negative certificate given by the PSA, shall then be submitted to the Registry of Deeds to fulfill the requirement for Mang Roy’s birth certificate.

Mang Roy’s children sought the kind help of their former landlords and the tenants of their farmlands.  All these people knew their father from as far back as when he was starting as a humble farmer and are all qualified to execute the needed affidavit.  As soon as the documents were notarized, Mang Roy’s children trooped to the ROD, submitted the documents, and explained to the clerk that their father’s birth was never registered and he did not have a birth certificate all his life.

Fortunately, the RDO accepted the documents and released the land titles of each of Mang Roy’s children.

It is important for all Filipinos to be duly registered at the LCR of their birthplaces and to have a copy of his birth certificate all the time.  If your parents still do not have birth certificates, find time to register them at their birthplaces so they would be properly accounted for by the PSA.  Every member of your household must have a copy of their PSA birth certificate, printed on the PSA’s Security Paper.

Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

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Feb 14

Sofie has always known that her mother’s name is Emelita.  That is the name written on all her mother’s IDs and on the birth certificates of Sofie and her siblings.  However, when Aling Emelita requested for a copy of her PSA birth certificate, they were shocked to see that her name is actually not Emelita but Maria Rosario!  All other information on her birth certificate is correct, her birth date, birthplace, and the names of her parents.  Everything, except her name.

They discovered this in the early ‘90s when Aling Emelita was preparing to work abroad.  Since she was in a hurry to get a passport, she resolved to use her Maria Rosario birth certificate and was granted a passport as Maria Rosario.

When Sofie graduated from high school with flying colors, her parents gifted her and her siblings a trip to Tokyo Disneyland.  Sofie and her three siblings, all minors, trooped to the DFA to get their passports.  But they were all horribly disappointed when their applications were put on hold because of the inconsistency in their mother’s name as written on their birth certificates and the name that appears on their mother’s birth certificate.  On their birth certificates, their mother is Emelita.  But on Aling Emelita’s, her name is Maria Rosario.

How does one correct their parent’s name as it appears on their birth certificate?

While it is clear that Aling Emelita has chosen to simply adopt her name as written on her birth certificate (Maria Rosario), she failed to work on correcting the details on her children’s birth certificates, where her name is still written as Emelita. 

Sofie and her siblings need to have their birth certificates corrected to reflect their mother’s name as Maria Rosario.  Here’s what they need to do:

  1. They need to go to the Local Civil Registry of their birthplace and request for correction of their mother’s name as it appears on their birth certificates.
  2. They must bring a copy of Aling Emelita’s PSA birth certificate where her name is written as Maria Rosario.  Any other government-issued ID of Aling Emelita (as Maria Rosario) will likewise help in further solidifying their petition.
  3. Fees vary according to municipality and payments must be made only with the city or municipal hall’s cashier.  All payments must be issued with a government receipt.  Be wary of fixers.
  4. When the petition is successfully filed by the LCR, Sofie and her siblings will be given a copy of the Finality and Endorsement pertaining to the correction they requested.
  5. After three to six months, they can begin following up with the PSA for the corrected copies of their birth certificates.  When making a follow-up, bring the Finality and Endorsement documents from the LCR.
  6. The first corrected copies of their birth certificates must be claimed at the PSA head office in Sta. Mesa, building 2.  All other succeeding copies may be requested online at www.psahelpline.ph.

If you have similar concerns about your birth certificate, send us your questions and we will do our best to find the best answer for you.

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Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

 

Feb 12.jpg

When a child is born out of wedlock, the child carries the mother’s family name unless the father gives his consent for his child to use his last name and acknowledges him on paper.  The date of marriage field on the child’s birth certificate must also be left blank until the parents are married, if and when.

There are cases when the child’s parents would place false information on their child’s birth certificate, declaring themselves to be married when they are not.  Some single moms manage to include the child’s father’s last name on the child’s birth certificate, without seeking the latter’s consent.  In their desire to save their child from being labeled illegitimate, they end up falsifying a public document, never mind the consequences it will eventually bring on their child.

So how does one correct the false information written on a birth certificate?

Nerissa and Joel were both only 22 years old when their eldest child, Denver, was born.  Because they did not want their firstborn to suffer the stigma of being an illegitimate child, and since they do have plans of getting married later on, they opted for Denver to carry his father’s last name.  Apart from that, they declared January 27, 2007 as their date of marriage – in reality, this was the date when they officially became a couple.

Fast forward to 10 years later when Denver, now a fifth grader and a prized athlete of their school, needs to secure a passport so he can compete in a swim meet in Singapore.  His mom prepared all the documents needed for submission to the DFA, including and most importantly, Denver’s PSA birth certificate.

It was only then that Nerissa realized that Denver’s birth certificate still bears the fake date of marriage of his parents and his last name is still that of his biological father’s.  Nerissa and Joel have since gone their separate ways; Nerissa is a single parent to Denver while Joel is married and is already residing abroad.

True enough, when they presented the documents at the DFA, Nerissa was asked to submit a copy of her and Joel’s “marriage certificate”.  When she said that she does not have a marriage certificate because she is, in fact, not married, Denver’s passport application was put on hold.

Mother and son went home brokenhearted and clearly, unsure of the next steps they need to make to clarify the issue.

Nerissa wanted to work on two things: first, to change her son’s last name to her maiden last name and second, to rectify the false date of marriage declared on the child’s birth certificate.

In this case, changing Denver’s last name should be the easier task.  She can file a petition in court to request for her son’s last name to be dropped and changed with hers.  As of the moment, Philippine courts grant these types of petitions only on the following grounds:

  1. When the name is or sounds ridiculous, dishonorable, or extremely difficult to write or pronounce;
  2. When the change results as a legal consequence such as legitimation;
  3. When the change will avoid confusion;
  4. When one has continuously used and been known since childhood by a Filipino name, and as unaware of alien parentage;
  5. A sincere desire to adopt a Filipino name to erase signs of former alienage, all in good faith and without prejudicing anybody; and
  6. When the surname causes embarrassment and there is no showing that the desired change of name was for a fraudulent purpose or that the change of name would prejudice public interest.

Obviously, Nerissa has a lot of explaining and justifying to do before the court.  She needs to justify why she is now seeking to change the last name of Denver and prove that the change is for her son’s best interest.

The fake date of marriage on Denver’s birth certificate is a case all on its own.  Dropping the fake date of marriage will be handled through a court order and with the assistance of Nerissa’s lawyer.  These types of cases take time and may cost Nerissa more than she would have bargained for.

Placing false and inaccurate information on civil registry documents is illegal and considered a crime in our country.  You may get away with it for a time but remember that whoever owns the document will eventually suffer the consequences of having false information on his or her birth or marriage certificate.

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Jan 23 - 1 (1)

On January 1, 2018, PhilHealth’s premium rates have been adjusted to 2.75% of the member’s monthly basic salary (MBS).

To help everyone appreciate how the adjustment impacts an employee’s contribution (and effectively, the salary deduction he should anticipate as a result of the rate increase), we are sharing the following table lifted from PhilHealth’s official Facebook page.

Monthly Basic Salary

(MBS)

Monthly Premium

(@2.75% of MBS)

Personal Share Employer Share
P8,999.99 P275.00

Based on P10,000 floor

P137.50 P137.50
P11,250.00 P309.375

Rounded off to the nearest hundredths =

P309.38

P154.69 P154.69
P25,410.00 P698.775

Round off to the nearest hundredths =

P698.78

P349.39 P349.39
P41,999.99 P1,100

Based on P40,000.00 ceiling

P550.00 P550.00

According to PhilHealth, if an excess of a centavo will occur when equally sharing the computed monthly premium, the excess centavo shall be deducted from the Employee’s share to get the monthly premium due.

Monthly Basic Salary (MBS) Monthly Premium (@2.75% of MBS) Premium per Share Personal Share Employer Share
P22,500.00 P618.75

(P618.76)

P309.375

Round off to the nearest hundredths =

P309.38

(P309.38)

P309.37*

P309.38

*Since P309.38 per share will result to a total of P618.76, the centavo is deducted from the Personal Share.

In accordance with RA 10361, the premium contributions of a Kasambahay shall be shouldered solely by the household employer.  However, if the Kasambahay  is receiving a monthly salary of P5,000 or above, the Kasambahay shall pay his or her proportionate share.  The same rule is followed for the Kasambahay’s SSS contribution.

If you have further questions about the premium rate adjustments of PhilHealth, feel free to call their 24/7 hotline at (02) 441-7442.

Source:

https://www.facebook.com/PhilHealth/

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Jan 08 (3)

Errors in your civil registry documents could adversely affect your transactions with the government or private establishments.  Often, erroneous birth certificates and other documents from the PSA are referred to the LCR of the place where the birth, death, or marriage was originally recorded.  Misspelled names and other obvious clerical corrections are rectified through a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error while more complicated cases are referred to a legal counsel or, sometimes, are heard in court.

One way or the other, the error is corrected or the missing information is supplied, and the owner of the civil registry document is then able to acquire an accurate copy of his PSA certificate.

After the correction process is completed, can the owner get a copy of his PSA document by ordering online or over the phone?

Why are there cases where even after the owner has satisfied all of the LCR’s requirements to apply the needed correction, the PSA’s copy of the same document remains erroneous?

We did our research and found out that the first corrected copy of any civil registry document (birth, death, marriage) that underwent correction or legal proceeding must be claimed at the PSA head office located at the Solicarel Building along Ramon Magsaysay Avenue, in Sta. Mesa, Manila.  Your best landmark is the LRT Pureza Station.

The first corrected copies must be claimed personally by the owner or the requesting party at the head office.  This too will trigger the PSA to provide the corrected copy of your succeeding requests that can then be done online or by phone (www.psahelpline.ph).  If you will insist on getting a corrected copy by ordering online, you will always get the old, erroneous copy.

If you have advised the LCR of the correction on your civil registry document but are still getting the erroneous copy from the PSA, chances are the corrected copy was not properly endorsed to the PSA.  If this happens, go back to the LCR where you filed the correction and ask for a copy of the endorsement made for your documents.  If they are able to provide you one, bring it to the PSA head office and use it as a supporting document for your request.  If the LCR does not have an endorsement, that means that the corrections applied to your civil registry certificate have not been properly communicated to the PSA yet.  Advise the LCR to endorse the corrected copy and inquire how long you need to wait before you may request for the corrected authenticated copy from the PSA.

Make sure to bring an endorsement from the LCR where the correction was initiated (usually, the LCR of the city or municipality where you were born or married) when requesting for the first corrected copy of your document.

If you have questions about PSA documents such as birth, marriage, death, and CENOMAR, send us a message and we will find the best answers for you.

Reference: http://www.psa.gov.ph

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Wrong Birth Year

A PSA Birth Certificate (formerly NSO Birth Certificate) bearing an incorrect birth date and month of the owner can be corrected under R.A. 9048 (also known as the Clerical Error Law).  But what if it is the birth year that needs correction?  Is this still covered by R.A. 9048?  Let us find out.

Gelay was born on December 15, 2015 in Calapan City, Mindoro.  On the same date, at 8PM, Typhoon Melor struck the province and immediately rendered the entire town paralyzed with floodwaters and strong winds.  Her mother gave birth at home for fear of getting stranded on her way to the hospital.

It took weeks before their area was cleared.  Gelay’s parents were able to take her to the clinic for a check-up three weeks after she was born.  And although the health workers reminded them to get Gelay registered at the city hall as soon as possible, other more pressing concerns brought by the typhoon kept both parents busy.

On February 2016, Gelay’s Lola came to visit and immediately took on the task of taking care of the baby.  She asked if Gelay has been registered yet and if a copy of her birth certificate is already available.  Only then did Gelay’s parents realize that they still have not accomplished their daughter’s birth registration!

The Lola volunteered to process the registration herself.  She supplied all the information needed on the certificate however, she failed to double check on her granddaughter’s date of birth.  Instead of December 15, 2015, the Lola wrote January 15, 2016.

When her parents requested for a copy of Gelay’s PSA birth certificate, they realized that the birth date and year reflected arewrong.  When they consulted a friend who works at the Local Civil Registry office, they were advised that Gelay’s case is not covered by R.A. 9048 or the Clerical Error Law.  Therefore, correcting the birth date, month, and year is not going to be a simple task (at least not as simple as correcting a misspelled name or incorrect birth month and date).

Although Gelay’s birthday, as reflected on her PSA Birth Certificate, is only a month short from her true and correct date of birth, her parents still need to file a case in court to have this corrected.  This is because the year of her birth needs to be corrected too.

Persons seeking to have this kind of error corrected need to consult a lawyer to find out what processes are involved and fees that need to be paid.  Make sure that you are transacting with a person who is legally empowered to give you advice and charge you fees to get the corrections duly applied on your birth certificate.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/civil-registration-laws/republic-act-no-10172-implementing-rules-and-regulations

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Wrong Gender

How do you correct a person’s gender in his NSO Birth Certificate (now PSA Birth Certificate)?  If he is male but his birth certificate shows him as “female”, can he have his birth certificate updated to show his correct gender?

If your birth certificate shows an incorrect gender, it is considered a clerical error and therefore, can be rectified by filing a petition for clerical or typographical error.  This can be done at the Local Civil Registry (LCR) office of the city or municipality where the birth was registered.

Here is what you need to do:

  1. The petition shall be in the form of an affidavit, subscribed and sworn to before an authorized notary public (someone authorized by law to administer oaths, particular erroneous entries that need to be corrected).
  2. The petition must be supported by the following:
    • A certified true machine copy of the certificate of the page of the registry book containing the entry sought to be corrected;
    • At least two public or private documents showing the correct entry upon which the correction or change shall be based;
    • Other documents that may be required by the LCR.
  3. Other documents that the petitioner needs to attach are:
    • Earliest school records
    • Medical records
    • Baptismal certificate
    • Medical certificate issued by an accredited government physician to prove that you have not undergone a sex change or sex transplant.
  4. Expect additional document requirements as may be found necessary.

In the event that the petition is granted, the decision shall be forwarded to the PSA and the proper annotation on your birth certificate shall be applied.

We have a summary of solutions to the most common PSA birth certificate problems!  Read our blog, Common PSA Birth Certificate Problems (and their solutions!).

Source: http://www.manilatimes.net/gender-error-in-birth-certificate/86168/

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