Tag Archive: birth certificate late registration


3 Mar 05

In yesterday’s blog, we have established that the DFA requires a copy of the applicant’s PSA birth certificate if it is his first time to apply for a passport.  Likewise, if the female applicant wishes to change her maiden last name to that of her husband’s she needs to submit a copy of her PSA marriage certificate, whether applying for the first time or renewing her passport.

In this week’s posts, we will feature the UNIQUE REQUIREMENTS for passport application, particularly the supporting documents that DFA requires for special cases.  This is for individuals with Late Registered Birth Certificates, or those whose birth details were reported beyond the reglementary period set by the Local Civil Registry and PSA.

Read on.

In addition to the core requirements we featured yesterday (refer to this blog), the following supporting documents must be presented if you have a Late Registered Birth Certificate.

  1. If your Birth Certificate was registered at least ten (10) years ago, the application will be treated as a regular application and no additional supporting documents will be required.
  2. If your Birth Certificate was registered less than ten (10) years ago, you must submit IDs that pre-date the late registration.
  3. If you do not have IDs that pre-date the late registered Birth Certificate, you must produce current IDs and secure an NBI clearance to support your passport application.

These are lifted from the www.passport.gov.ph website.  Take note that the DFA may still require additional documents depending on how your case will be evaluated.

Tomorrow, we shall feature the passport requirements for individuals who do not have birth certificates or report of birth.

See you again tomorrow!

Source: www.passport.gov.ph

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Closet Queen

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Feb 20 (1)

Mang Roy was a famous farmer in their barrio.  His success story, from being a humble tenant who plants and harvests for landlords, to being one of the wealthiest landowners and supplier of root crops, fruits, and vegetables in their province, is well-known in their barangay.  When he retired from farming at the age of 62, he has successfully established his family’s properties and remained to be the largest supplier of milled rice in their region.

Sadly though, Mang Roy passed away shortly after handing over the operations of their farms to his eldest daughter. After his death, his family decided to subdivide part of Mang Roy’s farmland, the areas that he set apart for his children’s inheritance.

Through the help of a lawyer, the documents needed to transfer the land’s titles to Mang Roy’s children were filed at the Registry of Deeds.  Everything went smoothly until the ROD required the children to submit a copy of Mang Roy’s birth certificate.

His wife requested for a copy at the Philippine Statistics Authority although, at the back of her mind, she knows that she has never seen a copy of her husband’s birth certificate.  She recalls him saying once that he doesn’t have a birth certificate.

True enough, their request returned void; they were instead handed a negative certificate – meaning, Mang Roy’s birth is not registered.  When they inquired how they can get a copy of Mang Roy’s birth certificate, they were advised to apply for a late registration of birth at the LCR in Mang Roy’s birthplace.

Late registration of birth happens when a child remains unregistered at the Local Civil Registry of his birthplace for more than 30 days after his birth.  For various reasons, parents fail to report their child’s birth to the municipal hall and as a result, these children grow up without a record of their birth.  Not having a birth certificate is not a complicated matter since all you have to do is submit the person’s information for proper registration.  It becomes complicated when the person you wish to register is already dead.

Although the requirements for late registration are pretty simple (an original copy of your Baptismal Certificate and a Certified True Copy of the person’s Marriage Certificate), these may prove to be inutile since the person who needs to be registered is already dead.  However, without Mang Roy’s birth certificate, his children may not be granted their inheritance.

Their family lawyer advised them to execute a Joint Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons – an attestation from two individuals who are not related to Mang Roy’s family but are fully aware of Mang Roy’s identity and roots.  This affidavit shall support the details of Mang Roy’s birth date and birthplace.  This, together with the negative certificate given by the PSA, shall then be submitted to the Registry of Deeds to fulfill the requirement for Mang Roy’s birth certificate.

Mang Roy’s children sought the kind help of their former landlords and the tenants of their farmlands.  All these people knew their father from as far back as when he was starting as a humble farmer and are all qualified to execute the needed affidavit.  As soon as the documents were notarized, Mang Roy’s children trooped to the ROD, submitted the documents, and explained to the clerk that their father’s birth was never registered and he did not have a birth certificate all his life.

Fortunately, the RDO accepted the documents and released the land titles of each of Mang Roy’s children.

It is important for all Filipinos to be duly registered at the LCR of their birthplaces and to have a copy of his birth certificate all the time.  If your parents still do not have birth certificates, find time to register them at their birthplaces so they would be properly accounted for by the PSA.  Every member of your household must have a copy of their PSA birth certificate, printed on the PSA’s Security Paper.

Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

 

 

 

03 - 29

Ang PSA Birth Certificate (dating NSO Birth Certificate) ay madalas na kasama sa listahan ng mga primary documentary requirements ng iba’t-ibang establishments tulad ng mga bangko, eskwelahan, at mga government agencies.  Ang birth certificate ay naka-print sa Security Paper (SECPA) at may selyo ng PSA sa upper left-hand corner ng dokumento.  Maaari itong makuha mula sa mga opisina ng PSA o ipa-deliver sa inyong bahay sa pamamagitan ng pag-order online o pagtawag sa hotline (02 – 737 – 1111).

Habang may mga taong nakakatanggap ng kopya ng kanilang PSA birth certificate, meron din naman na ang natatanggap na kopya ay iyong tinatawag na Negative Certification.  Ang ibig sabihin nito ay walang kopya ang PSA ng kanilang birth certificate.

Bakit Negative Certification ang natanggap ko mula sa PSA?

Ang dalawang dahilan kung bakit may mga nakakatanggap ng Negative Certification mula sa PSA ay:

  • Hindi pa naka rehistro ang kapanganakan ng taong nag request ng birth certificate.
  • Hindi pa nai-submit ng Local Civil Registry ang kopya ng birth certificate sa PSA.

Ano ang dapat kong gawin kapag nakatanggap ako ng Negative Certification?

Nakababahalang matuklasan na walang kopya ang PSA ng iyong birth certificate ngunit may paraan para maayos ito.

May kopya ang LCR ngunit walang kopya ang PSA.

Unahin mong alamin mula sa Local Civil Registry ng lugar kung saan ka ipinanganak kung meron silang record ng iyong kapanganakan.  Kadalasan ay merong naka file ngunit hindi nai-forward sa PSA para ma-certify.  Kung makukumpirma ng LCR na meron ka ngang birth certificate sa files nila, ito ang dapat mong gawin:

  1. Manghingi ng form sa LCR para makapag request ng Endorsement of Records.
  2. Bayaran ang courier fees sa Cashier at ipakita sa LCR ang iyong resibo.  Itago ang resibo bilang katibayan ng iyong filed transaction at binayarang courier fee.
  3. Pagkalipas ng isang linggo, maaari nang mag follow-up sa PSA Sta. Mesa office.  Dalhin ang resibo ng binayarang courier fee sa LCR para mas mabilis na ma-trace ang iyong transaction.

Ang unang kopya ng iyong pina-endorse na dokumento ay sa PSA Sta. Mesa makukuha.  Ang mga susunod na request ng kopya ng iyong PSA birth certificate ay maaari nang ma-order online o sa pagtawag sa PSAHelpline hotline na 02 – 737 -1111.

Walang naka-file na rehistro ng kapanganakan sa LCR.

Kung walang record ng iyong birth certificate na mahahanap ang LCR, ibig sabihin ay hindi narehistro ang iyong kapanganakan.  Wala ka talagang birth certificate at kailangan mong mag file ng Late Registration of Birth.

Maaari itong i-file sa munisipyo ng bayan kung saan ka ipinanganak.  Sakaling sa ibang bayan ka na nakatira, maaari ka na ring mag file sa LCR kung saan ka kasalukuyang naninirahan (Out-of-town Late Registration).

Ano ang requirements para makapag file ng Late Registration of Birth?

  1. Kung less than 18 years old:
    • Apat (4) na kopya ng Certificate of Live Birth na may kumpletong detalye at pirmado ng mga concerned parties.
    • Punuan din ng hinihinging detalye ang Affidavit of Delayed Registration sa likod ng Certificate of Live Birth.  Ang mga impormasyon dito ay magmumula sa ama, ina, o guardian ng may ari ng birth certificate, tulad ng:
      • Pangalan ng bata;
      • Petsa at lugar ng kapanganakan;
      • Pangalan ng ama ng bata kung ito ay illegitimate at kinikilala ng ama;
      • Kung legitimate ang bata, isulat ang petsa at lugar kung saan ikinasal ang mga magulang;
      • Isulat ang dahilan kung bakit hindi na-rehistro ang bata sa loob ng tatlumpung (30) araw mula sa petsa ng kanyang kapanganakan.
  2. Kung 18 years old and above:

Improtanteng ma-kumpirma mo muna na wala ka talagang birth records sa LCR ng iyong birthplace para maiwasan ang tinatawag na Double Registration.  Nangyayari ito kung meron nang birth registration ang isang tao at pagkalipas ng ilang taon ay nagpa-rehistro siyang muli sa ibang munisipyo.  Kung ito ang mangyayari, ang records na susundin ng LCR ay iyong unang registration; ito rin ang record na ipadadala sa PSA for certification.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

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26

A child’s birth must be registered at the city or municipal hall of the child’s birthplace within 30 days from the date of birth.  If parents fail to submit the necessary documents for registration, the child will not be issued a birth certificate until they file for a late registration.

Here are the documentary requirements when filing for late birth registration at the Quezon City Hall.  These are classified according the child’s birth right.

A. For Legitimate Children:

  • Original copy of the Baptismal Certificate
  • Certified True Copy of Marriage Contract

B. For Illegitimate Children:

  • Original copy of Baptismal Certificate
  • Joint Affidavit of two (2) disinterested persons

C. Acknowledgment through Documents (if father or mother or both parents are deceased):

  • Insurance
  • Report Card
  • Title of House and Lot
  • Certified True Copy of Death Certificate

Proceed to Counter 13 with the documents and wait for further instructions from the clerk.  A fee of PHP150 for late filing must be paid at the cashier.  You will also be informed when you may expect for the child’s birth certificate to be released for endorsement to the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) office.

Once certified by the PSA, you may request for a copy at any PSA branch.  Succeeding requests may already be done online via www.psahelpline.ph or by calling 02-737-1111 and have the birth certificate delivered to you.

Source: http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-services/requirements-a-procedures/261-civilregguide

Other related articles:

  1. How to File for Late Registration of Birth Certificate at the Manila City Hall
  2. Problems with NSO Birth Certificate: Delayed Registration of Birth

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

 

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08 - 31

A few months back, we featured an article on the conditions for married women to use their maiden names on their passports.  In that article, it was mentioned that a married woman needs to show proof that her marriage has been annulled or that she has been widowed before she can revert to her maiden name on her passport.

How easy (or difficult) is it really to get your maiden name back especially on major IDs like a passport or a driver’s license?  Here is a personal experience I would like to share for everyone’s information and guidance.

======================

My mom had her passport renewed at a DFA satellite office a few weeks back.  She was excited to have this processed as she saw it as a chance to change her name on her passport back to her maiden name.  Ever since she and my dad were granted their annulment several years ago, she had been diligently updating her IDs with her maiden name and her passport was actually foremost in her agenda.

She went to the DFA satellite office with her IDs, a copy of her original birth certificate (she was born in 1946), her annulment papers, and her old passport.  When she advised the DFA personnel that she would like to revert to her maiden name, she was requested to present a copy of her PSA birth certificate.  Since she did not have a copy ready with her, she decided to reschedule her passport renewal.

We ordered for a copy of her PSA birth certificate online through PSAHelpline.ph.  In less than 15 minutes, we were done with the entire ordering and payment process because the site accepts credit card payments!  In two days, my mom received a parcel from PSAHelpline.ph.

When she opened the package, she wasn’t entirely surprised to find a Negative Certificate instead of a copy of her birth certificate.  The PSA does not have a copy of her birth records.  We were advised by a friend who works at the Quezon City Hall to file for a late registration of our mother’s birth details that will then be forwarded to the PSA for certification.  Doing so would mean traveling all the way back to Cabanatuan City, my mom’s birth place.

Since my mom did not want to wait that long to have her passport renewed, she agreed to just use her married last name.  I advised that this may be a wise decision if she intends to apply for a tourist visa to the U.S. soon as her previous visas were issued under her married name.

When she agreed to keep her married name, all she needed to submit was a copy of her Senior Citizen ID and her old passport.  She is scheduled to pick up her new passport on September 21st, her 70th birthday.

===========================

You see ladies, getting your maiden name back is not as easy as most think.  So before giving it up, consider other possibilities.  In documents such as passports, you actually have the option to use your maiden name even if you are already married.

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Manila City Hall_1

If you are a resident of the city of Manila, you will find yourself transacting at one of the most historical city halls in our country at least once.  The iconic building is located at the corners of Taft Avenue, Padre Burgos Avenue, and Villegas Street in Ermita.  It may look old to some but it is eternally buzzing with activities and never without people coming and going, filing documents or retrieving records for various purposes.

People born in the city of Manila will always find a reason to visit the city hall.  To help you with your civil registry transactions, we are releasing this blog series on transaction procedures and lists of requirements, as published in their website.

Read and share!

Late Registration of Birth Certificate:

List of Requirements:

(a). Latest Certificate of No Record from the PSA (formerly NSO) and LCR of Manila.

(b). Endorsement from the Hospital and Affidavit stating reason of delay, if born in a hospital.

(c). Affidavit from the Midwife and Hilot stating reason of delay and Midwife License, if attended by Midwife and Hilot.  (Item no. 2 is no longer required if the hospital has since closed down and the Midwife or Hilot is deceased and unknown).

Note: Submit a Pre-Natal Record of the mother if 40 years old and above at the time of conception of the child regardless of the birth order.

(d). PSA Marriage Certificate of Parents.

If no record was issued, submit Birth Certificate of brothers and sisters with date and place of marriage of parents or Birth Certificate of older brothers and sisters.

If not married, submit an Affidavit to Use the Father’s Surname (AUSF) pursuant to RA 9255 and also to accomplish the Affidavit of Acknowledgment/Paternity at the back of the COLB (For Children born after August 1988).

Father to sign at the back portion of the Certificate of Live Birth for Admission of Paternity and Acknowledgment (For children born after August 1988).

If Father is deceased, submit documents such as Insurance, ITR (Income Tax Return) and other records that will prove the filiaton of the child or documents showing that the father has acknowledged the child.

For the REGISTRANT

Submit original copy of ANY TWO (2) of the following documents with the date and place of birth

(a). Baptismal Certificate

(b). School Records showing full name as registered in the school, date, and place of birth, name of parents (either Elementary or High School).

(c). Transcript of Records with date and place of birth.

(d). Voter’s Affidavit

(e). Employment Records (SSS / GSIS), if employed.

(f). ITR (Income Tax Return), if employed.

(g). Pre-Natal Record (for minor children)

(h). Other documents the office may consider relevant and necessary for the approval of the application (Philhealth, Service Record, Personal Data Sheet, Medical Record, Certificate from OSCA, etc.)

REMINDERS:

(a). Do not submit “Fake Documents” to avoid penalty.  All supporting documents are subject for Verification.

(b). All Birth Certificate and Marriage Contract for submission must be CERTIFIED COPIES from the PSA.

(c). If Birth Certificate is prepared by Midwife, Hilot, and Hospital, please avoid erasures.  Birth Certificate with erasures shall be returned for re-typing.

(d). Please complete all the needed requirements before submission.

(e). Ten (10) days posting period.  Will commence on the day when the requirements were submitted.

FEES:

If born in a hospital:

0-6 months – Php 115.00

6 months to less than 1 year old – Php 140.00

More than 1 year old – Php 190.00

If born through a Midwife/Hilot, or born in a hospital but hospital is already closed:

Php 290.00

If with AUSF, additional Php 30.00

The Manila City Hall does not receive applications and follow-ups every Friday.

Source: http://manila.gov.ph/services/civil-registry/

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Wrong Birth Year

A PSA Birth Certificate (formerly NSO Birth Certificate) bearing an incorrect birth date and month of the owner can be corrected under R.A. 9048 (also known as the Clerical Error Law).  But what if it is the birth year that needs correction?  Is this still covered by R.A. 9048?  Let us find out.

Gelay was born on December 15, 2015 in Calapan City, Mindoro.  On the same date, at 8PM, Typhoon Melor struck the province and immediately rendered the entire town paralyzed with floodwaters and strong winds.  Her mother gave birth at home for fear of getting stranded on her way to the hospital.

It took weeks before their area was cleared.  Gelay’s parents were able to take her to the clinic for a check-up three weeks after she was born.  And although the health workers reminded them to get Gelay registered at the city hall as soon as possible, other more pressing concerns brought by the typhoon kept both parents busy.

On February 2016, Gelay’s Lola came to visit and immediately took on the task of taking care of the baby.  She asked if Gelay has been registered yet and if a copy of her birth certificate is already available.  Only then did Gelay’s parents realize that they still have not accomplished their daughter’s birth registration!

The Lola volunteered to process the registration herself.  She supplied all the information needed on the certificate however, she failed to double check on her granddaughter’s date of birth.  Instead of December 15, 2015, the Lola wrote January 15, 2016.

When her parents requested for a copy of Gelay’s PSA birth certificate, they realized that the birth date and year reflected arewrong.  When they consulted a friend who works at the Local Civil Registry office, they were advised that Gelay’s case is not covered by R.A. 9048 or the Clerical Error Law.  Therefore, correcting the birth date, month, and year is not going to be a simple task (at least not as simple as correcting a misspelled name or incorrect birth month and date).

Although Gelay’s birthday, as reflected on her PSA Birth Certificate, is only a month short from her true and correct date of birth, her parents still need to file a case in court to have this corrected.  This is because the year of her birth needs to be corrected too.

Persons seeking to have this kind of error corrected need to consult a lawyer to find out what processes are involved and fees that need to be paid.  Make sure that you are transacting with a person who is legally empowered to give you advice and charge you fees to get the corrections duly applied on your birth certificate.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/civil-registration-laws/republic-act-no-10172-implementing-rules-and-regulations

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Bonjour. Mabuhay.

If you need to facilitate a late registration for your birth certificate, these are the requiremenst you will need to bring to the local civil registrar:

If the person is less than eighteen (18) years old, the following
shall be required:
Four (4) copies of the Certificate of Live Birth duly
accomplished and signed by the proper parties;
Accomplished Affidavit for Delayed Registration at the back of
Certificate of Live Birth by the father, mother, or guardian,
declaring therein, among other things, the following:
name of child
date and palce of birth
name of the father if the child is illegitmate and has
been acknowledged by him;
if legitimate, the date and place of marriage of parents; and
reason for not registering the birth within thirty (30)
days after the date of birth

In case the party seeking late registration of the birth of an
illegitimate child is not the mother, the party shall, in addition to
the foregoing facts, declare in a sworn statement the recent
whereabouts of the mother.
Any two of the following documentary evidences which may show
the name of the child, date and palce of birth, and name of mother
(and name of father, if the child has been acknowledged):
baptismal certificate;
school records (nursery, kinder-garten, or preparatory;
income tax return of parent/s;
insurance policy;
medical records; and
others, such as barangay captain’s certification.
Affidavit of two disinterested persons who might have
witnessed or known the birth of the child.

You can find more info at www.citizenservices.com.ph

Bonjour. Mabuhay.

Specifics for a Birth Certificate late registration.

Hope this is useful:

DELAYED REGISTRATION OF BIRTH

1. The requirements are:

a) if the person is less than eighteen (18) years old, the following shall be required:

i) four (4) copies of the Certificate of Live Birth duly accomplished and signed by the proper parties;

ii) accomplished Affidavit for Delayed Registration at the back of Certificate of Live Birth by the father,             mother, or guardian, declaring therein, among other things, the following:

  • name of child;
  • date and place of birth;
  • name of the father if the child is illegitimate and has been acknowledged by him;
  • if legitimate, the date and place of marriage of parents; and
  • reason for not registering the birth within thirty (30) days after the date of birth

In case the party seeking late registration of the birth of an illegitimate child is not the mother, the party shall, in addition to the foregoing facts, declare in a sworn statement the recent whereabouts of the mother.

iii) any two of the following documentary evidences which may show the name of the child, date and              place of birth, and name of mother (and name of father, if the child has been acknowledged):

  • baptismal certificate;
  • school records (nursery, kinder-garten, or preparatory);
  • income tax return of parent/s;
  • insurance policy;
  • medical records; and
  • others, such as barangay captain’s certification.

iv) affidavit of two disinterested persons who might have witnessed or known the birth of the child.             (46:1aa)

b) If the person is eighteen (18) years old or above.

i) all the requirements for the person who is less than eighteen (18) years old; and

ii) Certificate of Marriage, if married. (46:1ba)

2. Delayed registration of birth, like ordinary registration made at the time of birth, shall be filed at the     Office of the Civil Registrar of the place where the birth occurred. (46:3)

3. Upon receipt of the application for delayed registration of birth, the civil registrar shall examine the     Certificate of Live Birth presented, whether it has been completely and correctly filled in and all     requirements have been complied with. (47a)

4. In the delayed registration of the birth of an alien, travel documents showing the origin and nationality of     the parents shall be presented in addition to the requirements mentioned in Rule 25 (1). (49:2a)

Bonjour. Mabuhay.

So you called the NSO Helpline (02)7371111 or went to the nearest NSO office to request your NSO birth certificate only to receive a copy saying that you don’t have a record of birth at the NSO. Whoa. Now what? Just when you need that NSO certificate, something like this happens. Well, I dug up some facts on what to do. Hope these help.

Delayed Registration of Birth

1. The requirements are:

a) if the person is less than eighteen (18) years old, the following shall be required:
i) four (4) copies of the Certificate of Live Birth duly accomplished and signed by the proper parties;
ii) accomplished Affidavit for Delayed Registration at the back of Certificate of Live Birth by the father, mother, or guardian, declaring therein, among other things, the following: • name of child; • date and place of birth; • name of the father if the child is illegitimate and has been acknowledged by him; • if legitimate, the date and place of marriage of parents; and • reason for not registering the birth within thirty (30) days after the date of birth

In case the party seeking late registration of the birth of an illegitimate child is not the mother, the party shall, in addition to the foregoing facts, declare in a sworn statement the recent whereabouts of the mother.

iii) any two of the following documentary evidences which may show the name of the child, date and place of birth, and name of mother (and name of father, if the child has been acknowledged):
• baptismal certificate;
• school records (nursery, kindergarten, or preparatory);
• income tax return of parent/s;
• insurance policy;
• medical records; and
• others, such as barangay captain’s certification.

iv) affidavit of two disinterested persons who might have witnessed or known the birth of the child.

b) If the person is eighteen (18) years old or above.
i) all the requirements for the person who is less than eighteen (18) years old; and
ii) Certificate of Marriage, if married.

2. Delayed registration of birth, like ordinary registration made at the time of birth, shall be filed at the Office of the Civil Registrar of the place where the birth occurred.

3. Upon receipt of the application for delayed registration of birth, the civil registrar shall examine the Certificate of Live Birth presented, whether it has been completely and correctly filled in and all requirements have been complied with.

4. In the delayed registration of the birth of an alien, travel documents showing the origin and nationality of the parents shall be presented in addition to the requirements mentioned in Rule 25.

Now let’s say you need to claim a benefit or an insurance for a close relative. They say you need to present a death certificate as part of the requirements. Say you experience the same thing: no record at NSO. This is what you got to do:

Delayed Registration of Death

No delayed report of death shall be accepted for registration unless the following procedures and requirements are observed and complied with by the concerned parties:

a) four (4) copies of Certificate of Death, which must be accomplished correctly and completely;

b) affidavit for delayed registration which shall be executed by the hospital or clinic administrator if the person died in a hospital, clinic or in a similar institution, or by the attendant at death if the person died elsewhere. In default of the hospital or clinic administrator or attendant at death, the affidavit shall be executed by any of the nearest relative of the deceased, or by any person having legal charge of the deceased when the latter was still alive;

c) the affidavit referred to shall state among other things, the name of the deceased, the facts of his death, the date and place of burial or cremation, and the circumstances why the death was not reported for registration within thirty (30) days after death;

d) authenticated copy of the certificate of burial, cremation, or of other means of corpse disposal; and

e) approval for registration by the health officer in the box provided in the Certificate of Death.

The same goes for marriage certificates so make sure you get your marriage records in order.

Delayed Registration of Marriage

In delayed registration of marriage, the solemnizing officer or the person reporting or presenting the marriage certificate for registration shall be required to execute and file an affidavit in support thereof, stating the exact place and date of marriage, the facts and circumstances surrounding the marriage, and the reason or cause of the delay.

Hope these info help. Stay tuned for more or feel free to ask so we can find out together. 🙂

You can request for your NSO certificates by calling the NSO Helpline 737-1111 or by online chat at www.birthcertificates.com.ph


Registration information originally published on http://www.census.gov.ph

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