Tag Archive: NSO philippines


June 19 (1)

It is that time of the year when dengue mosquitoes seem to be more active in hunting their prey.  Young and old alike can fall victim to these pesky insects that carry the deadly dengue virus.  It is no secret why emergency rooms are never without a patient exhibiting the early signs of dengue fever.

Does PhilHealth cover dengue fever cases?

Yes.  That is why it is important that you keep your PhilHealth account updated because you never know when serious illnesses might attack.

PhilHealth’s coverage for dengue fever is based on the severity of the patient’s case.  There are simple cases of dengue and there are those that are listed as severe.  PhilHealth coverage will always be based on the attending physician’s final diagnosis.  Below is the list of case rates for dengue fever:

DESCRIPTION

CASE RATE PROFESSIONAL FEE

HEALTH CARE INSTITUTION FEE

Dengue without warning signs: Dengue fever (DF) Dengue hemorrhagic fever Grades 1 and 2; Dengue hemorrhagic fever without warning signs. 10,000.00 3,000.00 7,000.00
Dengue with warning signs; Dengue hemorrhagic fever with warning signs. 10,000.00 3,000.00 7,000.00
Severe Dengue; Severe Dengue Fever; Severe Dengue hemorrhagic fever. 16,000.00 4,800.00 11,200.00

To avoid inconvenience and delays in your claims, make sure that your PhilHealth contributions are updated every month.  You never know when diseases may strike and your only assurance of financial assistance during times of emergency is a flawless record with PhilHealth.

Keep your homes and yards dengue-free and make sure that your children are protected against mosquito bites while they are in school or at play.

If you have questions about PhilHealth, send us an email and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source: www.philhealth.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

Ad

June 11

Getting a ticket for a traffic or vehicle regulation violation means you will not only have to stop and spend a good 15 to 20 minutes negotiating with a traffic enforcer but also that you will have to pay the prescribed fee for the violation you committed.  It is both a pain in your schedule and your pocket that is why most drivers do everything in their capacity to avoid (or sometimes, evade!) these violations.

Among these violations are driving without a valid license which will cost you Php 3,000, reckless driving at Php 2,000 for the first offense, and parking violations that start at Php 1,000 for the first offense.

Today we will feature the violations that have stiffer penalties (translation: they cost a fortune!); these fines are so dear that the average Pinoy driver’s only means to pay for it is by completely avoiding the violation altogether.

  1. Driving a right-hand drive vehicle – Php 50,000

So your car was imported from Europe… big deal.

You should not be driving a right-handed vehicle in the Philippines unless you have Php 50,000 to spare for LTO.  This violation was only recently added to the list when car smuggling became a rampant case n the 2010s.  Also, driving a right-hand vehicle in the Philippines could pose more risk to drivers and pedestrians.

Should you insist in driving your RHD car in main thoroughfares (and you get caught!), your precious car will be impounded until you are able to have it corrected (translation: made into a left-hand drive vehicle).

  1. Driving a vehicle that has defective devices or is installed with improper or unauthorized accessories – Php 5,000

That’s not a collective amount, mind you.  You will be fined Php 5,000 for EVERY violation found in your car.  Example: your signal lights are not working, that’s Php 5,000; you have a carrier on the roof of your car that does not meet the standards of the LTO, that’s another Php 5,000.

  1. Passengers not wearing seatbelts – Php 1,000 (private cars), Php 3,000 (PUVs).

This law (yes, it’s a law!) that is meant to protect you from harm (similar to the law on the use of helmets for motorcycle drivers and passengers).  And so if you get penalized for not obeying this particular law, you are actually being fined for not loving your life enough to save it by wearing a seatbelt.

If a traffic enforcer sees you or your passenger not wearing your seatbelts, the driver will be fined the corresponding fees for private cars and PUVs, plus the driver’s license will be suspended for a week.  Ugh if you are a PUV driver.

  1. Smoke Belching – Php 2,000 (first offense)

If you and your car cause other drivers and pedestrians to cover their noses when you zoom past, you are smoke belching.  It also means that your car is in bad shape and should not be allowed on the road.

Should you insist, you will be fined Php 2,000 and who knows how much more after your first offense.

  1.  Fraudulent registration of your car – Php 3,000

The LTO would know when you have overlooked or failed to renew your car’s registration.  On the other hand, your car’s registration is one of the first things a traffic enforcer or the police look for when you are flagged for a traffic violation.  If your papers are not updated, then better prepare for a hefty fine and the risk of you not being able to drive your car for a year.

It is never wise to forego your responsibility in renewing your car’s registration; you will always end up spending more.

 

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

Ad

 

 

May 15

Pinoys have yet to fully accept the values and benefits of being insured.  Whether it is a life or medical insurance, every working Filipino must be protected from the inevitable.  When unfortunate situations arise – a family member gets sick, a child meets an accident – it is best to be prepared.

If you are employed by the government or by a private firm, it is most likely that you are granted a medical insurance sponsored by your employer.  This is a good thing to have, especially if it is extended to your family.  However, this is only applicable while you are salaried by your employer.  The moment you quit your job (or it quits you!), you lose the privilege and will be left on your own to manage when you or someone in your family gets sick.

That is why it is important that you have yourself enlisted as a member of the PhilHealth, if you haven’t yet.  The PhilHealth voluntary membership is open to anyone who does not have a fixed employment, not a senior citizen, not an indigent member, or sponsored member of the PhilHealth.

Who are qualified to become voluntary PhilHealth members?

  1. OFWs – documented or undocumented Filipino workers abroad.
  2. Self-employed professionals – self-earning individuals such as entrepreneurs, lawyers, doctors, and freelancers whose income is generated from their profession or business.
  3. Informal sector workers – people working in the informal economy, including jeepney and tricycle drivers, street and market vendors, and small construction workers.
  4. Dual citizens – Filipinos who also hodl citizenship in another country.
  5. Naturalized Filipino citizens – foreigners who have become Filipino citizens through naturalization.
  6. Expats – foreign workers who live in the Philippines with valid working permits or Alien Certificate of Registration.

What documentary requirements do you need to prepare when applying?

You only need a duly accomplished PhilHealth Member Registration Form (PMRF) and submit this to the nearest Local Health Insurance Office or PhilHealth Express outlet.

You will then be issued a Member Data Record or MDR and an ID card after your application has been reviewed.  Your PhilHealth ID number will serve as your lifetime PhilHealth number and must be used as reference when you pay your contributions to the cashier.

Online application is also available!

  1. Go to the PhilHealth Electronic Registration System.
  2. Click on “Proceed”.
  3. Read the Terms and Conditions, tick the small box below, and click “Accept”.
  4. On the PhilHealth online registration form, enter the required information.
  5. Upload your document in jpeg, pdf, gif, or png format.  (optional)
  6. Enter the provided Captcha code, tick the small box below, and click “Submit Registration”.

Access your email for the instructions on how to complete the rest of your application.  Take note of your transaction number as this will serve as your reference number to your registration.

How much should be my contribution?

Members earning PHP 25,000 or below every month must pay a quarterly contribution of PHP 600 (or PHP 200 per month / PHP 2,400 per year).

Members earning over PHP 25,000 must pay PHP 900 for the quarter (or PHP 300 per month / PHP 3,600 per year).

It costs so little to become a bona fide PhilHealth member, but the assurance of knowing that you are covered by the PhilHealth when emergencies strike will far outweigh the price you think you are paying now.

Visit the nearest PhilHealth office now and have yourself signed up as a member.

Reference: http://www.philhealth.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

Ad

May 08

The OEC is a basic requirement for OFWs before they are given permission to work abroad.  They must secure this to ensure that their departure and overseas employment are properly documented.  This document has a 60-day validity from the date it was issued; this means that the OFW must be able to leave before the OEC expires.

Apart from it being a basic requirement, an OEC document presented at the airport also exempts the traveler from paying travel taxes and terminal fees.  It serves as the exit pass or clearance of the OFW as well as a proof of his status as a legitimate OFW.

What are the requirements when securing an OEC?

  1. Passport with at least six months validity from departure date.
  2. Valid work visa, work permit, or any equivalent document.
  3. Verified employment contract or offer of employment.
  4. Printed Balik-Manggagawa Information Sheet

Other documents may be required depending on the required skills (professional, low-skilled, household services).  Canada and US workers will be required to submit additional requirements.  Always bring the original and photocopies of your documents.

Are there fees that need to be paid?

  • POEA Processing Fee – PHP 100 per e-receipt/OEC
  • OWWA Membership Fee – USD 25 (or its PHP equivalent)
  • Pag-IBIG Contribution – Minimum of PHP 100 each month
  • PhilHealth Contribution – PHP 2,400 for one-year coverage

How to apply for an OEC:

There are two ways to apply for an OEC:

Walk-in applicants may apply at any of these processing centers:

  • POEA main office at EDSA corner Ortigas Avenue, Mandaluyong City (Balik-ManggagawaProcessing Division/BMPD)
  • POEA regional offices, regional extension units, and satellite offices.
  • Philippine Overseas Labor Offices (POLO) in the country of employment.
  • Labor Assistance Counters at Manila, Cebu, and Mindanao airports (only for returning OFWs who are staying in the Philippines for five days or less).

You may also set an appointment online at the BM Online Appointment System; this will allow you to choose your preferred schedule and venue for processing of your OEC.

Walk-in applications, including those who have scheduled appointments, may take the whole day or several days to complete.

How to get an OEC Exemption

If you are an OFW and are returning to the same employer or workplace, and have an existing record with the POEA, you can be exempted from the OEC requirements.  All you have to do is log in to your BM online account before your scheduled departure and click on “Acquire OEC or Exemption”.  The system will show a pop-up confirmation message of your BM Exemption Number and pre-departure instructions on what documents you need to present at the airport.

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

Ad

Apr 13 (1)

If birth certificates do not expire, why do we need to secure new copies from the Philippine Statistics Authority (formerly National Statistics Office)?

In a recent radio interview, the assistant national statistician of the PSA mentioned the different reasons why Filipinos need to secure new copies of their civil registry records such as birth and marriage certificates.  Below is the list of reasons why you should request for brand new copies of your most important personal documents:

  1. PSA changes the color of the Security Paper they use when printing the birth certificates. All embassies and other government agencies are properly informed of this and therefore, are aware when a person’s birth certificate is an old copy or a new one.
  2. When the maximum number of printouts for a particular color scheme of the Security Paper is reached, the PSA changes the paper used for the birth certificates. This helps discourage the circulation of unauthorized and fake copies of birth, marriage, death, and Certificate of No Marriage (CENOMAR).
  3. It is the government agencies’ and other offices’ discretion to require brand new copies of PSA documents as a prerequisite for certain transactions. This means that some agencies may still accept certificates printed in old Security Papers, while others may reject these and require the applicants to submit new ones.  This is especially true when the applicant’s copy is dilapidated or when the entries in the document are hardly readable.
  4. You may secure copies of your PSA certificates at any of the six PSA outlets in Metro Manila or by calling the PSAHelpline hotline at 02-737-1111 and have your documents delivered to you instead.

For more information about PSA birth certificate delivery, visit www.psahelpline.ph.

References:

http://news.abs-cbn.com

www.psa.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

Ad

Feb 22

PhilHealth membership is not limited to regularly-employed Filipinos.  In fact, unemployed and self-employed individuals are strongly encouraged to faithfully make monthly contributions to secure their PhilHealth claims in times of emergencies.  Problem is, when a member fails to make a contribution for a month or two, they immediately think that they are no longer qualified to claim from PhilHealth.  Others opt to completely neglect paying their contributions because they think that missing one payment already means that all their other payments have been written off already.

To help everyone understand how the PhilHealth appropriates a member’s contribution, we are sharing the following checklists lifted from PhilHealth’s Facebook page.  These will help you determine if you are eligible for PhilHealth benefits in spite of irregular payments of your monthly contributions.

These checklists follow the 3/6 rule where the required number of monthly premium contributions is at least three (3) months within the immediate six (6) months (or 3/6!) prior to the first day of availment or hospital confinement.  The six-month period is inclusive of the confinement month.

a. If the admission date is: FEBRUARY 21, 2018 and the member’s contributions are as follows:

1

THE MEMBER IS ELIGIBLE.

b. If the admission date is: FEBRUARY 21, 2018 and the member’s contributions are as follows:

2

THE MEMBER IS NOT ELIGIBLE because the member only paid contributions for 2 months.

c. If the admission date is: FEBRUARY 21, 2018 and the member’s contributions are as follows:

3

THE MEMBER IS ELIGIBLE because he completed 3 months’ contributions within the immediate 6 months prior to confinement.

d. If the admission date is: FEBRUARY 21, 2018 and the member’s contributions are as follows:

4

THE MEMBER IS ELIGIBLE because he completed 3 months’ contributions within the immediate 6 months prior to confinement.

e. If the admission date is: FEBRUARY 21, 2018 and the member’s contributions are as follows:

5

THE MEMBER IS ELIGIBLE because he completed 3 months’ contributions within the immediate 6 months prior to confinement, EVEN IF THESE ARE NOT CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.

f. If the admission date is: FEBRUARY 21, 2018 and the member’s contributions are as follows:

5

THE MEMBER IS ELIGIBLE because he completed 3 months’ contributions within the immediate 6 months prior to confinement, EVEN IF THESE ARE NOT CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.

Nonetheless, PhilHealth still maintains that all members must remit their contributions faithfully and consistently.  This is the only way you can be assured of your eligibility to claim from PhilHealth.

Source: https://www.facebook.com/PhilHealth/

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

Ad

 

Feb 20 (1)

Mang Roy was a famous farmer in their barrio.  His success story, from being a humble tenant who plants and harvests for landlords, to being one of the wealthiest landowners and supplier of root crops, fruits, and vegetables in their province, is well-known in their barangay.  When he retired from farming at the age of 62, he has successfully established his family’s properties and remained to be the largest supplier of milled rice in their region.

Sadly though, Mang Roy passed away shortly after handing over the operations of their farms to his eldest daughter. After his death, his family decided to subdivide part of Mang Roy’s farmland, the areas that he set apart for his children’s inheritance.

Through the help of a lawyer, the documents needed to transfer the land’s titles to Mang Roy’s children were filed at the Registry of Deeds.  Everything went smoothly until the ROD required the children to submit a copy of Mang Roy’s birth certificate.

His wife requested for a copy at the Philippine Statistics Authority although, at the back of her mind, she knows that she has never seen a copy of her husband’s birth certificate.  She recalls him saying once that he doesn’t have a birth certificate.

True enough, their request returned void; they were instead handed a negative certificate – meaning, Mang Roy’s birth is not registered.  When they inquired how they can get a copy of Mang Roy’s birth certificate, they were advised to apply for a late registration of birth at the LCR in Mang Roy’s birthplace.

Late registration of birth happens when a child remains unregistered at the Local Civil Registry of his birthplace for more than 30 days after his birth.  For various reasons, parents fail to report their child’s birth to the municipal hall and as a result, these children grow up without a record of their birth.  Not having a birth certificate is not a complicated matter since all you have to do is submit the person’s information for proper registration.  It becomes complicated when the person you wish to register is already dead.

Although the requirements for late registration are pretty simple (an original copy of your Baptismal Certificate and a Certified True Copy of the person’s Marriage Certificate), these may prove to be inutile since the person who needs to be registered is already dead.  However, without Mang Roy’s birth certificate, his children may not be granted their inheritance.

Their family lawyer advised them to execute a Joint Affidavit of Two Disinterested Persons – an attestation from two individuals who are not related to Mang Roy’s family but are fully aware of Mang Roy’s identity and roots.  This affidavit shall support the details of Mang Roy’s birth date and birthplace.  This, together with the negative certificate given by the PSA, shall then be submitted to the Registry of Deeds to fulfill the requirement for Mang Roy’s birth certificate.

Mang Roy’s children sought the kind help of their former landlords and the tenants of their farmlands.  All these people knew their father from as far back as when he was starting as a humble farmer and are all qualified to execute the needed affidavit.  As soon as the documents were notarized, Mang Roy’s children trooped to the ROD, submitted the documents, and explained to the clerk that their father’s birth was never registered and he did not have a birth certificate all his life.

Fortunately, the RDO accepted the documents and released the land titles of each of Mang Roy’s children.

It is important for all Filipinos to be duly registered at the LCR of their birthplaces and to have a copy of his birth certificate all the time.  If your parents still do not have birth certificates, find time to register them at their birthplaces so they would be properly accounted for by the PSA.  Every member of your household must have a copy of their PSA birth certificate, printed on the PSA’s Security Paper.

Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

 

 

 

Jan 26

I was never a fan of keeping files as these have the tendency to pile up on my desk over time.  I have developed the habit of just getting what I need when I need it.  However, I realized this may not be a good practice when it comes to personal documents such as my birth certificate, transcript of records from college, and medical files.  Late last year, I was tasked to accompany my mom (who is a senior citizen) to the DFA to renew her passport.  Since she is a senior citizen, she was granted access to the Priority Lane and as her companion, I can have mine renewed on the same day as well.  It would have been the perfect opportunity to accomplish that task when we visited the DFA except that I did not have a copy of my PSA birth certificate.  I watched my mom breeze through the passport renewal process while I sat there, sadly thinking of the long and arduous process of snagging an appointment online and waiting for months for my turn at the DFA – all because I did not have a ready copy of my PSA birth certificate.

I am writing this piece to help shed some light on the importance of keeping your files updated with a ready copy of your personal documents from the PSA.  This is not limited to just birth certificates; married couples need to have a copy of their marriage certificate and every death in the family must be properly registered and documented too.  Keep copies of the PSA death certificates of your elders and other family members; you never know when you might need this for claims and possible inheritances.

Reasons why you need to always have a copy of your PSA birth certificate:

  1. Obtaining a Driver’s License

A driver’s license is one of the top government-issued IDs honored in almost all, if not all, public and private transactions (schools, banks, etc.).  You have to have your own license by the time you turn 21 years old (at least! Although I got mine when I turned 19).  Your PSA birth certificate is a basic requirement when applying for a driver’s license at the LTO.

  1. Applying for your Social Security System (SSS) number and ID

Your SSS number is a basic requirement when applying for a job (fresh graduates).  Again, your PSA birth certificate is a basic requirement, whether you are applying for your SSS number online or are appearing personally at an SSS office.

  1. Getting Married

You cannot get married in the Philippines without a proper Marriage License issued by the city or municipal hall.  In order to be issued a Marriage License, you need to prove that you are of legal, marrying age or if you still need to present your parents’ consent.  They will require a copy of your PSA birth certificate before they process your request for a Marriage License.

  1. Traveling Abroad

Whether you are a first-time applicant or are simply renewing your old passport, you need to present a copy of your PSA birth certificate.  The DFA will keep the original copy (or the copy you obtained from PSA) so make sure to photocopy your birth certificate before heading for your passport interview.  Or better yet, order more than one copy of your birth certificate so you can keep the rest for your files.  Yes, some government agencies require the original, not the reproduced copy.

  1. Bank Transactions

When my nephew turned 10, his parents gifted him with his very first savings account at BDO.  One of the requirements was a copy of my nephew’s PSA birth certificate.  I learned too that in some cases of loan applications, the client is required to submit a copy of his PSA birth and marriage certificate.

  1. School Enrolment

Keeping copies of your children’s PSA birth certificates in your files means one item crossed out from your to-do list during enrolment season.  Schools will always require copies of your child’s birth certificate so never ever be without these documents in your stash.

There are a multitude of other transactions where you may be required to submit a copy of your PSA birth certificates; quite a handful too for marriage and death certificates especially when transacting with a government agency.

You may easily obtain copies of your PSA certificates by ordering online at www.psahelpline.ph.  All you need to do is visit the website and submit a filled-out application form.  You may also pay conveniently with your credit card or visit any of their partner banks and payment remittance centers to secure your orders.  Your PSA certificates will be delivered to your preferred address, stress-free!

If you have questions about your PSA birth certificate, send us a message and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

ad

Jan 24 (1)

A basic requirement for passport renewal is the submission of the expired (or expiring passport) so the DFA can cancel its validity.  But what if the old passport has gone missing?

Here’s how you can renew a lost and expired passport:

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

  • Personal appearance.
  • Confirmed appointment.
  • No need to submit a passport size photo.
  • Submit same documents required for first-time passport applicants.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS in case the passport was lost and cannot be found:

  • Submit a Notarized Affidavit of Loss (with detailed explanation on when, where, and how the passport got lost).
  • If the lost passport is still valid, submit a Police Report.
  • If available, bring a photocopy of the first page of the lost passport.

Take note that there will be a 15-day clearing period prior to the processing of an application for replacement of a lost valid passport.

IN CASE PASSPORT WAS ALREADY DECLARED LOST BY THE APPLICANT BUT EVENTUALLY WAS FOUND AND RETURNED TO THE APPLICANT:

  • Submit a Notarized Affidavit of Retrieval (with detailed explanation on when, where, and how passport was found).
  • Original and photocopy of the first and last page of the passport.

IN CASE OF MUTILATED OR DAMAGED PASSPORTS:

  • Submit a Notarized Affidavit of Mutilation (with a detailed explanation of when, where, and how the passport got mutilated or damaged).
  • Original and photocopy of the first and last page of mutilated or damaged passport.

IN CASE APPLICANT WAS ISSUED A TRAVEL DOCUMENT:

  • Original Travel Document
  • Submit a Notarized Affidavit of Explanation Regarding Issuance of Travel Document (with a detailed explanation of when, where, and why the applicant was issued a travel document).
  • Original and photocopy of the first and last page of canceled passport (if the passport is still in the possession of the applicant).

It is not advisable to pose as a first-time passport applicant if you lost your passport.  The DFA will see your previous passport details anyway and you will be required to submit the same documents (affidavit of loss, etc.) as listed above.  Your appointment will be wasted and you may run the risk of being placed under questionable applications.

Source:

www.dfa.gov.ph

www.officialgazette.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

Ad

Jan 18

Back in the day, passport applicants are required to bring copies of their 2×2 ID photos when applying for their Philippine passports.  Restrictions are limited to the type of shirt you should be wearing on the photo (with collar) and the background should be white.  Applicants are also advised to avoid wearing accessories such as eyeglasses and earrings that may cause huge differences from their actual physical appearance.

Now, all you need to do is personally appear at your preferred DFA branch on the date of your appointment.  All your biometrics: photos, fingerprints, and signatures will be taken onsite and in the presence of a DFA representative.

Here are some tips on how to prepare for your passport photo-op and other biometric requirements:

  1. Your Pose.

The interviews and document evaluation will be done while you sit across a DFA representative in a booth.  Right beside you is a DLSR camera, aimed at your face.  When advised by the representative, look directly at the camera lens.  Your “selfie angle” may not meet the DFA’s photo requirements so avoid tilting your head in any direction.  Your mouth and the bridge of your nose should form an imaginary vertical line at the center of the image.

  1. Your Expression.

Avoid smiling too much or frowning too much; do not raise your eyebrows nor squint your eyes or any other facial expression that may alter your natural look.  Your expression should be neutral, both eyes open and mouth closed.  Your forehead must be clearly seen without hair covering any part of your eyes or cheeks.

  1. Smiling.

You may smile but careful you do not show your teeth and gums!

  1. Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses

Remove your eyeglasses before you pose for your passport photo.  If you use contact lenses for medical reasons, you may leave it on provided these are not colored contacts.  Otherwise, you may be advised by the representative to remove the contacts before they take your photo.

  1. Ears.

Both ears should be visible.  Tuck your hair behind your ears if you have to.

  1. Earrings and Hair Accessories

Remove hair accessories before posing for your photo.  If you keep an unconventional hairstyle (afro, frizzy, out-of-bed-look), please make sure it is neatly kept for your passport appointment.

Any type of earring is not allowed.

  1. Infants and small children.

Babies and toddlers who are still unable to support themselves should be assisted by a parent or guardian.  They can hold the child but their hands and arms should not be visible in the photo.  If you need a high chair for your baby, you may request from a DFA staff while waiting for your turn to give them time to look for one.

The DFA enforces strict rules on dress codes, whether you are applying for a passport or claiming one.  When I visited the DFA in SM Manila two years ago, there was a young lady who wanted to claim her passport but was denied entry because she was wearing a mini-skirt.  She had to find a scarf that was large enough to cover her legs until below the knee before the guards allowed her to come in.

If you have questions about passport application, send us a message and we will do our best to find the best answers for you.

Reference: www.dfa.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

Ad

 

%d bloggers like this: