Tag Archive: nso birth certificate delivery


Jan 18

Back in the day, passport applicants are required to bring copies of their 2×2 ID photos when applying for their Philippine passports.  Restrictions are limited to the type of shirt you should be wearing on the photo (with collar) and the background should be white.  Applicants are also advised to avoid wearing accessories such as eyeglasses and earrings that may cause huge differences from their actual physical appearance.

Now, all you need to do is personally appear at your preferred DFA branch on the date of your appointment.  All your biometrics: photos, fingerprints, and signatures will be taken onsite and in the presence of a DFA representative.

Here are some tips on how to prepare for your passport photo-op and other biometric requirements:

  1. Your Pose.

The interviews and document evaluation will be done while you sit across a DFA representative in a booth.  Right beside you is a DLSR camera, aimed at your face.  When advised by the representative, look directly at the camera lens.  Your “selfie angle” may not meet the DFA’s photo requirements so avoid tilting your head in any direction.  Your mouth and the bridge of your nose should form an imaginary vertical line at the center of the image.

  1. Your Expression.

Avoid smiling too much or frowning too much; do not raise your eyebrows nor squint your eyes or any other facial expression that may alter your natural look.  Your expression should be neutral, both eyes open and mouth closed.  Your forehead must be clearly seen without hair covering any part of your eyes or cheeks.

  1. Smiling.

You may smile but careful you do not show your teeth and gums!

  1. Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses

Remove your eyeglasses before you pose for your passport photo.  If you use contact lenses for medical reasons, you may leave it on provided these are not colored contacts.  Otherwise, you may be advised by the representative to remove the contacts before they take your photo.

  1. Ears.

Both ears should be visible.  Tuck your hair behind your ears if you have to.

  1. Earrings and Hair Accessories

Remove hair accessories before posing for your photo.  If you keep an unconventional hairstyle (afro, frizzy, out-of-bed-look), please make sure it is neatly kept for your passport appointment.

Any type of earring is not allowed.

  1. Infants and small children.

Babies and toddlers who are still unable to support themselves should be assisted by a parent or guardian.  They can hold the child but their hands and arms should not be visible in the photo.  If you need a high chair for your baby, you may request from a DFA staff while waiting for your turn to give them time to look for one.

The DFA enforces strict rules on dress codes, whether you are applying for a passport or claiming one.  When I visited the DFA in SM Manila two years ago, there was a young lady who wanted to claim her passport but was denied entry because she was wearing a mini-skirt.  She had to find a scarf that was large enough to cover her legs until below the knee before the guards allowed her to come in.

If you have questions about passport application, send us a message and we will do our best to find the best answers for you.

Reference: www.dfa.gov.ph

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Jan 16 (1)

There is a better and more efficient means to get PSA documents (birth, marriage, CENOMAR, death) and that is by ordering online at www.psahelpline.ph.  It works just like any other online retail facility where you simply choose the item you need, place it in your virtual cart, pay, and then wait for the order to arrive.

What PSA certificates can you order online?

You may request for copies of birth, marriage, death, and Certificate of No Marriage or CENOMAR.  Simply click on the ORDER NOW! button found on the site’s homepage, and then choose the document you need.

I only need the document for my files.  Can I still request online or is this facility only for those who are in a hurry?

PSAHelpline.ph is for everyone, especially those who do not have time to travel to or visit a PSA office. The site offers several reasons for requesting a PSA certificate; however, if you are requesting for personal purposes, you may simply choose ETC. (others) and specify that you need it for your files.

What personal information are required when placing an order?

Your first, middle, and last names are required, as well as your gender, birthday, birthplace, and birth right.  You will also be asked for your parents’ names so if you are not familiar with the spellings, better do an advance research to avoid discrepancies in your submitted application.

Have you had any legal proceedings done to your birth certificate?

Legal proceedings include:

1. Correction of entry

Your birth certificate underwent “Correction of Entry” if you had a name spelling or birth date corrected.  There should be an annotation in your birth certificate to show the correct entries; you will not be issued a new copy of your birth certificate.

2. Legitimation

If a child is born out of wedlock, his birth right will show that he is illegitimate.  When his biological parents marry afterwards, they have the option to file for Legitimation Due To Subsequent Marriage.  This process changes the child’s birth right from illegitimate to legitimate; the child may now rightfully use his father’s last name.

3. Adoption

After due adoption process, annotations will be affixed to the adopted child’s birth certificate.

4. Court Hearings

Common reasons why a person’s birth certificate undergoes legal proceedings is changing of middle and last names.  The changes will appear as annotations on the birth certificate.

5. Supplemental Report

If there are fields left blank in your birth certificate, it will be issued a Supplemental Report in order to supply the missing entries.  These will reflect as annotations on the blank spaces in your document, not necessarily written on the blank fields.

You need to indicate any legal proceeding done to your birth certificate, as part of the online ordering process.

Who is requesting for the document?

The site requires for the identity of the person placing the order and his relationship with the owner of the certificate.  The requesting party must be of legal age and must be the same person to receive the document upon delivery.

Requesting parties could be the owner himself, spouse, parents, children, and grandchildren. If the requesting party is not a relative, choose None of the Above.

Checkout

Just like any other online shopping site, you will be given the chance to review the details of your ordered certificate on the Order Summary page.  Take time to review all entries you made; any error may negatively affect your order.

Provide a working mobile, landline, and email address where PSAHelpline.ph may contact you for any concerns with your application.

The fields for your delivery address are clearly labeled; the city and municipality fields have dropdown arrows where you can select the most appropriate location of your area.

In case you are not available to receive the documents you ordered, you need to assign at least three representatives and indicate their names at the bottom part of the screen.  If you fail to assign a representative, the courier will only be released to you as the Requesting Party.

Indicate how many copies you wish to order and then tick the small box beside I certify that all the information I’ve provided is true and correct.

Order Confirmation

Your order is confirmed when you are issued a Reference Number; this is the 10-digit number that will appear on your screen after you submit your order.  This will also be sent to your email as added reference.

You may now proceed with the payment of the ordered certificates.

Payment Channels

You have several options when paying for your ordered PSA certificates.

  1. Online payment using your Visa or Mastercard credit cards.
  2. Through Bancnet ATM
  3. BayadCenters
  4. EZPay at 7-11 stores

What you need upon document delivery

Make sure you are physically present at the delivery address on the days you are expecting the documents to arrive.  Prepare a valid ID to support your identity as the requesting party.

If you assigned representatives to receive the document on your behalf, leave a signed authorization letter and one valid ID.  The representative must also be able to present at least one valid ID to the courier.

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03 - 29

Ang PSA Birth Certificate (dating NSO Birth Certificate) ay madalas na kasama sa listahan ng mga primary documentary requirements ng iba’t-ibang establishments tulad ng mga bangko, eskwelahan, at mga government agencies.  Ang birth certificate ay naka-print sa Security Paper (SECPA) at may selyo ng PSA sa upper left-hand corner ng dokumento.  Maaari itong makuha mula sa mga opisina ng PSA o ipa-deliver sa inyong bahay sa pamamagitan ng pag-order online o pagtawag sa hotline (02 – 737 – 1111).

Habang may mga taong nakakatanggap ng kopya ng kanilang PSA birth certificate, meron din naman na ang natatanggap na kopya ay iyong tinatawag na Negative Certification.  Ang ibig sabihin nito ay walang kopya ang PSA ng kanilang birth certificate.

Bakit Negative Certification ang natanggap ko mula sa PSA?

Ang dalawang dahilan kung bakit may mga nakakatanggap ng Negative Certification mula sa PSA ay:

  • Hindi pa naka rehistro ang kapanganakan ng taong nag request ng birth certificate.
  • Hindi pa nai-submit ng Local Civil Registry ang kopya ng birth certificate sa PSA.

Ano ang dapat kong gawin kapag nakatanggap ako ng Negative Certification?

Nakababahalang matuklasan na walang kopya ang PSA ng iyong birth certificate ngunit may paraan para maayos ito.

May kopya ang LCR ngunit walang kopya ang PSA.

Unahin mong alamin mula sa Local Civil Registry ng lugar kung saan ka ipinanganak kung meron silang record ng iyong kapanganakan.  Kadalasan ay merong naka file ngunit hindi nai-forward sa PSA para ma-certify.  Kung makukumpirma ng LCR na meron ka ngang birth certificate sa files nila, ito ang dapat mong gawin:

  1. Manghingi ng form sa LCR para makapag request ng Endorsement of Records.
  2. Bayaran ang courier fees sa Cashier at ipakita sa LCR ang iyong resibo.  Itago ang resibo bilang katibayan ng iyong filed transaction at binayarang courier fee.
  3. Pagkalipas ng isang linggo, maaari nang mag follow-up sa PSA Sta. Mesa office.  Dalhin ang resibo ng binayarang courier fee sa LCR para mas mabilis na ma-trace ang iyong transaction.

Ang unang kopya ng iyong pina-endorse na dokumento ay sa PSA Sta. Mesa makukuha.  Ang mga susunod na request ng kopya ng iyong PSA birth certificate ay maaari nang ma-order online o sa pagtawag sa PSAHelpline hotline na 02 – 737 -1111.

Walang naka-file na rehistro ng kapanganakan sa LCR.

Kung walang record ng iyong birth certificate na mahahanap ang LCR, ibig sabihin ay hindi narehistro ang iyong kapanganakan.  Wala ka talagang birth certificate at kailangan mong mag file ng Late Registration of Birth.

Maaari itong i-file sa munisipyo ng bayan kung saan ka ipinanganak.  Sakaling sa ibang bayan ka na nakatira, maaari ka na ring mag file sa LCR kung saan ka kasalukuyang naninirahan (Out-of-town Late Registration).

Ano ang requirements para makapag file ng Late Registration of Birth?

  1. Kung less than 18 years old:
    • Apat (4) na kopya ng Certificate of Live Birth na may kumpletong detalye at pirmado ng mga concerned parties.
    • Punuan din ng hinihinging detalye ang Affidavit of Delayed Registration sa likod ng Certificate of Live Birth.  Ang mga impormasyon dito ay magmumula sa ama, ina, o guardian ng may ari ng birth certificate, tulad ng:
      • Pangalan ng bata;
      • Petsa at lugar ng kapanganakan;
      • Pangalan ng ama ng bata kung ito ay illegitimate at kinikilala ng ama;
      • Kung legitimate ang bata, isulat ang petsa at lugar kung saan ikinasal ang mga magulang;
      • Isulat ang dahilan kung bakit hindi na-rehistro ang bata sa loob ng tatlumpung (30) araw mula sa petsa ng kanyang kapanganakan.
  2. Kung 18 years old and above:

Improtanteng ma-kumpirma mo muna na wala ka talagang birth records sa LCR ng iyong birthplace para maiwasan ang tinatawag na Double Registration.  Nangyayari ito kung meron nang birth registration ang isang tao at pagkalipas ng ilang taon ay nagpa-rehistro siyang muli sa ibang munisipyo.  Kung ito ang mangyayari, ang records na susundin ng LCR ay iyong unang registration; ito rin ang record na ipadadala sa PSA for certification.

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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03 - 14 (2)

This summer, various government agencies will be opening its doors to qualified high school and college students who wish to work and earn a few bucks while waiting for classes to resume. Interested applicants must meet the following requirements:

  1. Student / out-of-school youth at least 15 years old but not more than 24 years old;
  2. Must be enrolled this school year / must have the intention to enroll next school year (if out-of-school);
  3. The combined annual net income of both parents, including his/her own income if any, must not exceed Php 143,000;
  4. Student must have obtained at least an average passing grade during the last school year / term attended; and
  5. Must possess office skills such as knowledge in computer applications.

Documentary Requirements:

  1. SPES FORM 2 – APPLICATION FORM (Special Program for Employment of Students).
  2. PSA Birth Certificate
  3. Photocopy of latest Income Tax Return of parents or certification issued by BIR that the parents are exempted from payment of tax, or
  4. Original Certificate of Indigence or
  5. Original Certificate of Low Income issued by the barangay.

All applications must be submitted to the following address, on or before March 27, 2017.

Office of the Youth Formation Division, 3rd Floor, Mabini Building, DepEd Central Office, Meralco Avenue, Pasig City.

You may also scan the application and requirements and send in zipped file format to blss.yfd@deped.gov.ph

Source:

http://www.rappler.com/nation/163846-news-briefs-philippines-march-13-2017?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=referral

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03-06

Of all the questions and clarifications we regularly receive through this blog, changing the last name of an illegitimate child tops our list.  These questions often come from single moms who either:

  1. Gave their maiden last name to their illegitimate child and now wants the child to use the last name of the biological father;
  2. Gave their maiden last name to their illegitimate child and now wants the child to use the last name of the adoptive father;
  3. Gave the biological father’s last name to the illegitimate child and now wants the father’s last name dropped from the child’s name and replace it with her last name.

Today’s blog shall focus on these three circumstances and how the processes of achieving the desired results differ from each other.  If you are about to become a single mom, this article may help you in deciding whose last name your child should carry.

What does the Family Code say about illegitimate children?

According to Executive Order No. 209, otherwise known as the Family Code of the Philippines, illegitimate children are children conceived and born outside a valid marriage (Art. 164).  Under the same E.O., illegitimate children shall use the surname and shall be under the parental authority of their mother. (Art. 176).

In 2004 however, Article 176 was amended by virtue of R.A. 9255.  The new law allows illegitimate children to use the surname of their biological father, provided that the father acknowledges his paternity over the child.

How does this new law affect the three cases of changing the last name of illegitimate children?

Before R.A. 9255 took effect, an illegitimate child shall carry its mother’s last name (while the middle name field is left blank) until the biological parents marry and the child is subsequently legitimated.  With the amendment of Article 176 (of R.A. 209), single mothers (and fathers!) now have the option to have the child carry the biological father’s last name in their birth certificates.

a. If an illegitimate child, carrying his mother’s maiden last name, wants to start using his father’s last name, he needs to execute a document, private or public, where he is recognized by his father as his child.  Such documents may be:

  • The affidavit found at the back of the Certificate of Live Birth (COLB); or
  • A separate PUBLIC document executed by the father, expressly recognizing the child as his.  The document should be handwritten and signed by the father; or
  • A separate PRIVATE handwritten instrument such as the Affidavit to Use the Surname of the Father (AUSF).  Note that the AUSF is used when the birth has been registered under the mother’s surname, with or without the father’s recognition.

b. If an illegitimate child, carrying his mother’s maiden last name, wants to use the last name of his adoptive father.

  • This shall follow the process of legal adoption.

c. If the single mother wants to drop the last name of the illegitimate child’s biological father from the child’s birth certificate.

  • This is a relatively new scenario that may have surfaced after R.A. 9255 took effect.  When unmarried parents decide to let the child use the father’s last name and then separate later on, the single mother may soon decide that her child’s birth certificate is better off without her ex-partner’s name on it.
  • This case needs to undergo court hearing and the results are entirely dependent on how the proceedings will go.  This may also entail more costs, time, and effort before a favorable result is achieved.

While the said amendment gives parents the liberty to let their illegitimate child carry the biological father’s name (or any other man’s name for that matter, as long as he is willing to let his last name be used by the child), it also opens opportunities for problems on the child’s birth certificate when the mother and the father do not end up marrying each other.  Keep in mind that after a child’s birth certificate has been duly registered at the LCR and a copy has been released to the PSA, any changes, especially those affecting the child’s last name, may prove to be more complicated than we would care to admit.

What is a single parent’s best recourse in order to avoid problems on the child’s last name?

If we are to base our answer on the above scenarios, then the best option would be for a single mother to simply let her child use her maiden last name, sans the middle name.  This leaves enough room for changes later on, minus the hassle of a court order.

a. If the child is using his mother’s maiden name, he can easily adopt his biological father’s last name in case his parents marry later on;

b. If the child’s mother marries a different man, the stepfather may simply adopt the child and give the child the legal right to carry his name.  Without adoption, the child is free to carry his mother’s maiden last name.

This is merely a personal opinion based solely on the numerous cases of dropping the last name of an illegitimate child due to unforeseen circumstances between his unmarried parents.  You are free to choose the option you deem best and applicable to your situation.  As an additional option, consider it best to consult a lawyer who may be able to provide you with professional advise on your situation.

Reference: http://www.psa.gov.ph

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02-20

While we anticipate the approval of the proposed 10-year validity of Philippine passports, we should continue to mark our calendars as to when we should be applying for a passport renewal.  Currently, Philippine passports have a 5-year validity period and most passengers who have less than a year before their passports expire are no longer permitted to leave the country.

This is a dilemma encountered by most OFWs.

So what happens if your passport expires while you are overseas?

Read on:

1.Allow a one year renewal period.

Avoid waiting until you only have a few weeks left before your passport expires.  The process of renewing your passport from abroad takes at least 8 to 12 weeks.

2. Visit the Philippine Embassy / Consulate General in the country where you are currently located.

a. Bring your passport and other pertinent documents related to your travel or stay.

b. The Philippine Embassy will send your renewal application to the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) office in Manila.

c. Check online if the Philippine Embassy in your area requires applicants to set up an appointment.  Most Philippine Embassies accommodate walk-in applications for passport renewal.

d. All details such as photographs, fingerprints, and signatures will be taken on-site.

3. What are the documents you need to bring?

a. Duly accomplished passport application form, typed or printed legibly on black or blue ink.

b. Latest passport.

c. One (1) photocopy of each of the data page/s of the passport.

d. Photocopy of any valid identification card where the middle name is fully spelled out, such as state4 ID, driver’s license, Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate, or Baptismal Certificate.

e. Proof that applicant has not applied for foreign citizenship, e.g. resident alien card (green card).

These requirements may vary depending on the host country of the Philippine Embassy you will be applying to.

4. But how about if the passport IS already expired?

If your passport got lost or is already expired and you need to travel back to the Philippines, you have to secure a Travel Document from the Philippine Embassy in your host country.

What is a Travel Document?

  • Travel documents are issued to Philippine nationals returning to the Philippines, who for one reason or another, have lost their passport or cannot be issued a regular passport.
  • It is also issued to Filipino citizens who are being sent back to the Philippines.
  • It is valid for a non-extendable period of thirty (30) days from date of issuance and only for a one-way direct travel to the Philippines.  It cannot be used for re-entry to the host country.

The travel Document can only be issued when:

  • The consular officer determines that its use is warranted by emergency/critical circumstances.
  • It cannot be used as a short cut in complying with the requirements for the renewal of a passport or the replacement of a lost passport.

Renewing your Philippine passport abroad may be the last thing you would want to do while on a trip, whether as a tourist or an overseas worker.  You can avoid this by simply making sure that your passport is kept up-to-date.  Until the law on the 10-year validity period for Philippine Passports has been ratified, we all need to exert a little more effort in making sure that our passports are updated and are not expiring anytime soon.

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/2013-04-04-07-00-36

http://bangkokpe.dfa.gov.ph/consular-office/services/passport/travel-document

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/philippines-dc/consular-services-dc/faq-dc/

http://www.pinoyhood.com/renew-passport-abroad/

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02-08

A passport applicant was denied because her name on her birth certificate did not match any of the IDs and clearances she presented to the DFA.  Why is this so?

Janine’s parents’ marriage was annulled shortly after she turned one year old.  After the annulment, her mother immediately reverted to using her maiden last name.  Since the mother had sole custody of Janine, she decided to drop the father’s last name and had Janine use her maiden name in all of her records instead.

Now, at 34 years old, Janine applied for her passport (for the first time) and was shocked when she was told her application was denied.  According to the DFA, the name on her birth certificate and the names on the rest of her documents and IDs do not match.  And because of this, she needs to have her birth certificate amended first before her application could be entertained.

Janine was willing to just use her name as it appears on her birth certificate but they explained to her that this could not be done.  The DFA verifies a person’s identity against all of the documents and IDs required of an applicant and since her names do not match, they could not issue her a passport.

What are the requirements when applying for a passport for the first time?

  1. Personal appearance of applicant.
  2. Confirmed appointment
  3. Duly accomplished application form (may be downloaded from the DFA website).
  4. Birth Certificate in PSA Security Paper (SECPA) or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar (LCR) and duly authenticated by the PSA.
  5. Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity such as:
    • Government-issued picture IDs:
      • Digitized SSS ID
      • Driver’s License
      • GSIS E-card
      • PRC ID
      • IBP ID
      • OWWA ID
      • Digitized BIR ID
      • Senior Citizen’s ID
      • Unified Multi-purpose ID
      • Voter’s ID
      • Old College ID
      • Alumni ID
      • Old Employment IDs
    • And at least two of the following:
      • PSA Marriage Contract
      • Land Title
      • Seaman’s Book
      • Elementary or High School Form 137 or Transcript of Records with readable dry seal.
      • Government Service Record
      • NBI Clearance
      • Police Clearance
      • Barangay Clearance
      • Digitized Postal ID
      • Readable SSS-E1 Form or Microfilmed Copy of SSS E1 Form
      • Voter’s Certification, List of Voters and Voter’s Registration Record
      • School Yearbook

Janine presented her PSA Birth Certificate, her college IDs, her company ID, and her Voter’s ID.  Of the four, only her birth certificate shows her last name as that of her father’s while the rest were all her mother’s maiden last name.

She was advised to proceed to the Local Civil Registry where her birth was registered and inquire about the processes involved in changing her surname (as a result of the nullification of her parents’ marriage).  Once her birth certificate has been duly annotated with the necessary changes (on her last name), she may apply for her passport once again.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/index.php/2013-04-04-06-59-48

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02-07

A child born out of wedlock is an illegitimate child.  Under the law, such children shall carry their mother’s last name on their birth certificates unless their father provides his consent to let the child use his last name.  In cases when the parents of an illegitimate child decide to marry later on, the child’s status is effectively changed to “legitimate”.  And as a legitimzied child, he or she is given the same entitlements as that of a legitimate child, retroacting to the time of the child’s birth.  This includes the child’s right to use her father’s surname.

So how come “legitimized” children, who have been using their father’s last name since after their parents got married (after their birth), are still required to execute an AUSF (Affidavit to Use Surname of Father) if they want to use their father’s last name on their passports?  (Otherwise, their passports shall bear the last name of the mother as if their birth right is still illegitimate).

When a child is “legitimized”, certain procedures must be undertaken in order to apply the child’s father’s last name on the child’s birth certificate.  Unless the necessary amendments and attachments have been officially applied on the child’s birth certificate, her right to use her father’s last name may still be questioned.

When applying for a passport, the DFA requires a copy of the applicant’s PSA Birth Certificate.  This shall be their basis for the person’s information, including and most especially, the person’s name.  If the birth certificate is not supported by documents attesting to the fact that the person has been “legitimized”, he or she may not be able to use the father’s last name on his passport.

If you were legitimized (due to subsequent marriage of your parents), you need to accomplish the following in relation to your use of your father’s last name:

a. Visit the office of the Local Civil Registrar where your birth was registered and secure the following documents:

  • Affidavit of Paternity/Acknowledgment (certified photocopy)
  • Joint Affidavit of Legitimation
  • Certification of Registration of Legal Instrument (Affidavit of Legitimation)
  • Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate with remarks/annotation based on the legitimation by subsequent marriage.

b. Verify that the birth certificate (of the legitimated child) and the marriage contract of the parents have been certified by the PSA.  If not, secure it from the city or municipal Civil Registrar’s Office where the child was registered and where the parents were married.

When applying for a passport and you would like to use your father’s last name:

  • Bring a copy of your PSA Birth Certificate.
  • Check to make sure that your copy includes an annotation regarding your new status as legitimated.
  • If the legitimized child is still a minor, the mother must be present during the passport application.
  • If the mother is abroad, the person accompanying the child (including the father), must be able to execute the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.

A legitimized child may use her father’s last name on her passport provided her PSA Birth Certificate bears the necessary annotations regarding her legitimation and documented proof that the father has allowed the child to use his last name (AUSF, Affidavit of Support and Consent).

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

https://psa.gov.ph/content/application-requirements

http://www.manilatimes.net/illegitimate-child-has-to-use-mothers-surname/230283/

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02-06

Applying for your child’s first passport is one of the most important things you need to accomplish after securing the certification of his birth certificate and before he begins with school.  The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) prioritizes passport applications for children aged 7 years old and below.  Parents no longer need to secure an appointment in order to be accommodated; they will be attended to as long as they have the complete set of documents needed for passport application.  We released a blog on the list of requirements and processes involved when applying for a minor’s passport.

But what if the minor applicant is an illegitimate child?  Is there a different set of documentary requirements that the parent or parents need to prepare?  In the absence of the mother, can the father apply for the child’s passport?  What if the child’s mother is a minor as well, will the DFA honor her application for her child’s passport?

We ran a research on this specific subject on passport applications and would like to share what we gathered from the DFA website and other related sources.

General requirements for illegitimate minor applicants:

  1. Personal appearance of the minor applicant.
  2. Personal appearance of child’s mother and her valid IDs or valid passport.  If the child’s mother resides abroad, the applicant’s guardian must present the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent.
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.
    • If the mother is in the Philippines, she must appear before the DFA office in order for the passport application to be processed.  The above supporting documents are applicable only if the child’s guardians can show proof that the mother is residing abroad.
  3. If the child’s mother is likewise a minor:
    • Personal appearance of child’s mother (who is a minor) and the child’s maternal grandparent/s.
    • PSA Birth Certificate of minor applicant and mother (who is a minor).
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent executed by the maternal grandparent/s indicating the name of the traveling companion.
    • DSWD clearance if the minor child will be traveling with the person other than the maternal grandparents.
    • Proof of identity of mother and maternal grandparent/s.
  4. Original birth certificate of minor in Security Paper issued by the PSA or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar and duly authenticated by the PSA.
    • Transcribed Birth Certificate from the LCR is required when entries in the PSA Birth Certificate are blurry or unreadable.
    • Report of birth duly authenticated by PSA is required if minor was born abroad.
  5. Document of identity with photo, if the minor is 8-17 years old (for first time and renewal applicant) such as School ID or Form 137 with readable dry seal.
  6. For minor applicants who never attended school, a Notarized Affidavit of Explanation executed by the mother detailing the reasons why the child is not in school.
  7. Original and photocopy of valid passport of the person traveling with the minor.

Clearly, the only instance when the DFA would entertain passport applications for illegitimate minors filed by a person other than his mother is if the mother is not in the Philippines.  Otherwise, only the child’s mother may transact with the DFA in order to obtain a passport for the illegitimate child.

If the child’s mother is also a minor or is physically or mentally impaired, the child’s maternal grandparents are next in line as authorized individuals to apply for the minor child’s passport.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

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01

When a loved one passes away, family members are suddenly faced with a lot of things that need their time and attention, all at the same time.  One of the most important things they need to accomplish is the registration of death.  This is a pertinent requirement especially when the family needs to claim insurances and other benefits under the name of the deceased; the sooner this is accomplished, the better for the bereaved family.

Death certificates are usually provided by the hospital where the person died; if the person died at home, the family may secure the death certificate from the funeral home/parlor.

Here are the requirements and registration fees when registering a death at the Quezon City Hall:

Requirements:

a. Death certificate that is certified by a licensed medical doctor or the attending physician, and

b. Signature of embalmer and his/her license number.

Registration Fees:

Registration Fee PHP 50.00
Burial Permit PHP 50.00
Transfer to Other Municipality/City PHP 100.00
Entrance from Other Municipality / City PHP 200.00
Exhumation of cadaver PHP 75.00
Removal of cadaver PHP 75.00
Renewal of an old niche (5 years) PHP 500.00
Issuance of Certified True Copy of Death Certificate PHP 40.00
Issuance of Certified True Copy of Death Certificate using Security Paper (SECPA) PHP 60.00

You may submit the documents for death registration at Counter 8 while payments are made at Counters 1 and 2.

Source: http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-services/requirements-a-procedures/261-civilregguide

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