Tag Archive: nso birth certificate delivery


02-20

While we anticipate the approval of the proposed 10-year validity of Philippine passports, we should continue to mark our calendars as to when we should be applying for a passport renewal.  Currently, Philippine passports have a 5-year validity period and most passengers who have less than a year before their passports expire are no longer permitted to leave the country.

This is a dilemma encountered by most OFWs.

So what happens if your passport expires while you are overseas?

Read on:

1.Allow a one year renewal period.

Avoid waiting until you only have a few weeks left before your passport expires.  The process of renewing your passport from abroad takes at least 8 to 12 weeks.

2. Visit the Philippine Embassy / Consulate General in the country where you are currently located.

a. Bring your passport and other pertinent documents related to your travel or stay.

b. The Philippine Embassy will send your renewal application to the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) office in Manila.

c. Check online if the Philippine Embassy in your area requires applicants to set up an appointment.  Most Philippine Embassies accommodate walk-in applications for passport renewal.

d. All details such as photographs, fingerprints, and signatures will be taken on-site.

3. What are the documents you need to bring?

a. Duly accomplished passport application form, typed or printed legibly on black or blue ink.

b. Latest passport.

c. One (1) photocopy of each of the data page/s of the passport.

d. Photocopy of any valid identification card where the middle name is fully spelled out, such as state4 ID, driver’s license, Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate, or Baptismal Certificate.

e. Proof that applicant has not applied for foreign citizenship, e.g. resident alien card (green card).

These requirements may vary depending on the host country of the Philippine Embassy you will be applying to.

4. But how about if the passport IS already expired?

If your passport got lost or is already expired and you need to travel back to the Philippines, you have to secure a Travel Document from the Philippine Embassy in your host country.

What is a Travel Document?

  • Travel documents are issued to Philippine nationals returning to the Philippines, who for one reason or another, have lost their passport or cannot be issued a regular passport.
  • It is also issued to Filipino citizens who are being sent back to the Philippines.
  • It is valid for a non-extendable period of thirty (30) days from date of issuance and only for a one-way direct travel to the Philippines.  It cannot be used for re-entry to the host country.

The travel Document can only be issued when:

  • The consular officer determines that its use is warranted by emergency/critical circumstances.
  • It cannot be used as a short cut in complying with the requirements for the renewal of a passport or the replacement of a lost passport.

Renewing your Philippine passport abroad may be the last thing you would want to do while on a trip, whether as a tourist or an overseas worker.  You can avoid this by simply making sure that your passport is kept up-to-date.  Until the law on the 10-year validity period for Philippine Passports has been ratified, we all need to exert a little more effort in making sure that our passports are updated and are not expiring anytime soon.

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/2013-04-04-07-00-36

http://bangkokpe.dfa.gov.ph/consular-office/services/passport/travel-document

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/philippines-dc/consular-services-dc/faq-dc/

http://www.pinoyhood.com/renew-passport-abroad/

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02-08

A passport applicant was denied because her name on her birth certificate did not match any of the IDs and clearances she presented to the DFA.  Why is this so?

Janine’s parents’ marriage was annulled shortly after she turned one year old.  After the annulment, her mother immediately reverted to using her maiden last name.  Since the mother had sole custody of Janine, she decided to drop the father’s last name and had Janine use her maiden name in all of her records instead.

Now, at 34 years old, Janine applied for her passport (for the first time) and was shocked when she was told her application was denied.  According to the DFA, the name on her birth certificate and the names on the rest of her documents and IDs do not match.  And because of this, she needs to have her birth certificate amended first before her application could be entertained.

Janine was willing to just use her name as it appears on her birth certificate but they explained to her that this could not be done.  The DFA verifies a person’s identity against all of the documents and IDs required of an applicant and since her names do not match, they could not issue her a passport.

What are the requirements when applying for a passport for the first time?

  1. Personal appearance of applicant.
  2. Confirmed appointment
  3. Duly accomplished application form (may be downloaded from the DFA website).
  4. Birth Certificate in PSA Security Paper (SECPA) or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar (LCR) and duly authenticated by the PSA.
  5. Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity such as:
    • Government-issued picture IDs:
      • Digitized SSS ID
      • Driver’s License
      • GSIS E-card
      • PRC ID
      • IBP ID
      • OWWA ID
      • Digitized BIR ID
      • Senior Citizen’s ID
      • Unified Multi-purpose ID
      • Voter’s ID
      • Old College ID
      • Alumni ID
      • Old Employment IDs
    • And at least two of the following:
      • PSA Marriage Contract
      • Land Title
      • Seaman’s Book
      • Elementary or High School Form 137 or Transcript of Records with readable dry seal.
      • Government Service Record
      • NBI Clearance
      • Police Clearance
      • Barangay Clearance
      • Digitized Postal ID
      • Readable SSS-E1 Form or Microfilmed Copy of SSS E1 Form
      • Voter’s Certification, List of Voters and Voter’s Registration Record
      • School Yearbook

Janine presented her PSA Birth Certificate, her college IDs, her company ID, and her Voter’s ID.  Of the four, only her birth certificate shows her last name as that of her father’s while the rest were all her mother’s maiden last name.

She was advised to proceed to the Local Civil Registry where her birth was registered and inquire about the processes involved in changing her surname (as a result of the nullification of her parents’ marriage).  Once her birth certificate has been duly annotated with the necessary changes (on her last name), she may apply for her passport once again.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/index.php/2013-04-04-06-59-48

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02-07

A child born out of wedlock is an illegitimate child.  Under the law, such children shall carry their mother’s last name on their birth certificates unless their father provides his consent to let the child use his last name.  In cases when the parents of an illegitimate child decide to marry later on, the child’s status is effectively changed to “legitimate”.  And as a legitimzied child, he or she is given the same entitlements as that of a legitimate child, retroacting to the time of the child’s birth.  This includes the child’s right to use her father’s surname.

So how come “legitimized” children, who have been using their father’s last name since after their parents got married (after their birth), are still required to execute an AUSF (Affidavit to Use Surname of Father) if they want to use their father’s last name on their passports?  (Otherwise, their passports shall bear the last name of the mother as if their birth right is still illegitimate).

When a child is “legitimized”, certain procedures must be undertaken in order to apply the child’s father’s last name on the child’s birth certificate.  Unless the necessary amendments and attachments have been officially applied on the child’s birth certificate, her right to use her father’s last name may still be questioned.

When applying for a passport, the DFA requires a copy of the applicant’s PSA Birth Certificate.  This shall be their basis for the person’s information, including and most especially, the person’s name.  If the birth certificate is not supported by documents attesting to the fact that the person has been “legitimized”, he or she may not be able to use the father’s last name on his passport.

If you were legitimized (due to subsequent marriage of your parents), you need to accomplish the following in relation to your use of your father’s last name:

a. Visit the office of the Local Civil Registrar where your birth was registered and secure the following documents:

  • Affidavit of Paternity/Acknowledgment (certified photocopy)
  • Joint Affidavit of Legitimation
  • Certification of Registration of Legal Instrument (Affidavit of Legitimation)
  • Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate with remarks/annotation based on the legitimation by subsequent marriage.

b. Verify that the birth certificate (of the legitimated child) and the marriage contract of the parents have been certified by the PSA.  If not, secure it from the city or municipal Civil Registrar’s Office where the child was registered and where the parents were married.

When applying for a passport and you would like to use your father’s last name:

  • Bring a copy of your PSA Birth Certificate.
  • Check to make sure that your copy includes an annotation regarding your new status as legitimated.
  • If the legitimized child is still a minor, the mother must be present during the passport application.
  • If the mother is abroad, the person accompanying the child (including the father), must be able to execute the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.

A legitimized child may use her father’s last name on her passport provided her PSA Birth Certificate bears the necessary annotations regarding her legitimation and documented proof that the father has allowed the child to use his last name (AUSF, Affidavit of Support and Consent).

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

https://psa.gov.ph/content/application-requirements

http://www.manilatimes.net/illegitimate-child-has-to-use-mothers-surname/230283/

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02-06

Applying for your child’s first passport is one of the most important things you need to accomplish after securing the certification of his birth certificate and before he begins with school.  The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) prioritizes passport applications for children aged 7 years old and below.  Parents no longer need to secure an appointment in order to be accommodated; they will be attended to as long as they have the complete set of documents needed for passport application.  We released a blog on the list of requirements and processes involved when applying for a minor’s passport.

But what if the minor applicant is an illegitimate child?  Is there a different set of documentary requirements that the parent or parents need to prepare?  In the absence of the mother, can the father apply for the child’s passport?  What if the child’s mother is a minor as well, will the DFA honor her application for her child’s passport?

We ran a research on this specific subject on passport applications and would like to share what we gathered from the DFA website and other related sources.

General requirements for illegitimate minor applicants:

  1. Personal appearance of the minor applicant.
  2. Personal appearance of child’s mother and her valid IDs or valid passport.  If the child’s mother resides abroad, the applicant’s guardian must present the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent.
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.
    • If the mother is in the Philippines, she must appear before the DFA office in order for the passport application to be processed.  The above supporting documents are applicable only if the child’s guardians can show proof that the mother is residing abroad.
  3. If the child’s mother is likewise a minor:
    • Personal appearance of child’s mother (who is a minor) and the child’s maternal grandparent/s.
    • PSA Birth Certificate of minor applicant and mother (who is a minor).
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent executed by the maternal grandparent/s indicating the name of the traveling companion.
    • DSWD clearance if the minor child will be traveling with the person other than the maternal grandparents.
    • Proof of identity of mother and maternal grandparent/s.
  4. Original birth certificate of minor in Security Paper issued by the PSA or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar and duly authenticated by the PSA.
    • Transcribed Birth Certificate from the LCR is required when entries in the PSA Birth Certificate are blurry or unreadable.
    • Report of birth duly authenticated by PSA is required if minor was born abroad.
  5. Document of identity with photo, if the minor is 8-17 years old (for first time and renewal applicant) such as School ID or Form 137 with readable dry seal.
  6. For minor applicants who never attended school, a Notarized Affidavit of Explanation executed by the mother detailing the reasons why the child is not in school.
  7. Original and photocopy of valid passport of the person traveling with the minor.

Clearly, the only instance when the DFA would entertain passport applications for illegitimate minors filed by a person other than his mother is if the mother is not in the Philippines.  Otherwise, only the child’s mother may transact with the DFA in order to obtain a passport for the illegitimate child.

If the child’s mother is also a minor or is physically or mentally impaired, the child’s maternal grandparents are next in line as authorized individuals to apply for the minor child’s passport.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

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01

When a loved one passes away, family members are suddenly faced with a lot of things that need their time and attention, all at the same time.  One of the most important things they need to accomplish is the registration of death.  This is a pertinent requirement especially when the family needs to claim insurances and other benefits under the name of the deceased; the sooner this is accomplished, the better for the bereaved family.

Death certificates are usually provided by the hospital where the person died; if the person died at home, the family may secure the death certificate from the funeral home/parlor.

Here are the requirements and registration fees when registering a death at the Quezon City Hall:

Requirements:

a. Death certificate that is certified by a licensed medical doctor or the attending physician, and

b. Signature of embalmer and his/her license number.

Registration Fees:

Registration Fee PHP 50.00
Burial Permit PHP 50.00
Transfer to Other Municipality/City PHP 100.00
Entrance from Other Municipality / City PHP 200.00
Exhumation of cadaver PHP 75.00
Removal of cadaver PHP 75.00
Renewal of an old niche (5 years) PHP 500.00
Issuance of Certified True Copy of Death Certificate PHP 40.00
Issuance of Certified True Copy of Death Certificate using Security Paper (SECPA) PHP 60.00

You may submit the documents for death registration at Counter 8 while payments are made at Counters 1 and 2.

Source: http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-services/requirements-a-procedures/261-civilregguide

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25

All babies born in Quezon City must be duly registered at the Quezon City Hall within 30 days from the date of birth.  If the parents fail to register the child’s birth within the prescribed period, the child’s registration will be tagged as “delayed” and further documentation and fees shall be required.

How to file the registration:

  1. Secure a copy of the registration form from the hospital or maternity clinic where the child was born.  Usually, it is the hospital staff that accomplishes the form for the parents.  If the baby was delivered by a licensed midwife, she should be able to provide a copy of the registration form as well.
  2. In case the hospital or the midwife are not able to provide you a copy, you may secure one at Counter 11 in the Quezon City Hall and at the office of the Philippine Statistics Authority.  Parents may be required to present a copy of their marriage contract to determine the legitimacy of the child.
  3. For regular filing of a child’s birth (within 30 days from date of birth), proceed to Counter 31.  All 16 counters for Civil Registry transactions at the Quezon City Hall are open to the public from Monday to Friday from 8:00AM to 5:00PM, no lunch breaks.  They do, however, have a 15-minute break between 10:00AM to 10:15AM and from 3:00 to 3:15PM.  Windows will be closed during these intervals.

Fees:

  1. Late Filing – PHP150
  2. Issuance of Certification of No Record – PHP50
  3. Issuance of Certified True Copy – PHP 40 per copy
  4. Rush Issuance of Certified True Copy – PHP50
  5. Issuance of Certified True Copy using Security Paper (SECPA) – PHP60 per copy

Source: http://quezoncity.gov.ph/index.php/qc-department/261-civilregguide

Other related articles:

  1. How to File for Late Registration of Birth Certificate at the Manila City Hall Part 1 of 16
  2. The Manila City Hall Series: How to File for Correction of Clerical Errors in the First Name Under RA 9048 (For Married Individuals) Part 2 of 16

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10 Best Tips to Avoid Getting Offloaded from Your Flight

01-11

One of the worst things that can happen to a traveler is to get offloaded from his flight.  The truth is, there is no definite list of things that one can do in order to completely avoid being barred from boarding his plane.  It can happen to a tourist, a CEO on a business trip, and even OFWs.

This article intends to inform travelers of what they need to have on hand when checking in and boarding their planes.  These are based on actual experiences of other travelers as well as tips from Immigration Officers (who have seen one too many passengers suffer the consequences of incomplete and insufficient documents to corroborate the veracity for their trip).

  1. Be ready with sufficient travel documentation.
    • Your passport must have at least six months before expiration.
    • Your visa must be updated (if visa is required in your destination).
    • Print out your hotel booking confirmation as well as receipts to prove that you have paid your accommodation in full.
    • Be able to present a return ticket to the Philippines, where the date and time of your flight are clearly stated.  The date on your return ticket must not exceed your allowed period of stay.
    • If on a guided tour, print out a copy of your itinerary and familiarize yourself with the places you will be visiting.
    • OFWs must have their work contracts handy.
    • If traveling with a minor who is not your child, or minor is illegitimate and traveling with the father only, be able to present the necessary travel permits secured from the DSWD.
    • Your PSA Marriage Certificate and PSA Birth Certificates could come in handy to verify your age and affinity.
  2. Provide consistent, clear, and confident answers to the Bureau of Immigration officers.
    • Maintain your composure when being interviewed by an Immigration officer.  Listen carefully to his questions and provide honest answers.
    • Avoid saying too much; simply state what is being asked of you.
    • Expect questions such as: “What attractions are you planning to visit in….?” and “Who will be paying for your trip?”  Again, it pays to be familiar with your travel itinerary and be prepared to prove that you can afford the trip.
  3. Dress appropriately.
    • While travelers are free to dress as they please, it would do a first time traveler good to choose clothing that is not too revealing or too casual.
    • If traveling to a country during winter season, you are expected to bring a jacket, beanies, and gloves.  When traveling to the Middle East, you are expected to wear the prescribed clothing in the country, especially for women.
    • Showing too much skin might trigger an impression of a sex worker which is a red flag among immigration officers.
  4. Immigration Officers look out for solo travelers.
    • When traveling alone, be prepared for further questions from Immigration officers as the Immigration is particular on travelers’ safety and security, more particularly for female solo travelers.
    • Any inconsistency in the traveler’s answers and documents, however minor this may be, could be grounds for the passenger to be denied his flight.
  5. Be firm with the purpose of your trip.
    • If you have nothing to hide, you should be able to ace the interview and be allowed to board faster.
    • Immigration officers do not only listen to your answers, they also observe your body language.  Be confident and sincere when talking to them.
  6. Be able to prove that you can afford the trip.
    • Sponsored travelers must be able to provide an affidavit of support and guarantee, including letters of invitation authenticated by the Philippine consulate or embassy in your destination country.
    • Prepare a copy of your financial statements, certificate of employment, proof of salary, credit cards, and other proofs of residency.  Unemployed travelers must be prepared to show how they will be paying for the trip; if someone else is paying for the trip, prepare authenticated letters of invitation and other proofs that someone else will be shouldering your expenses while abroad.
  7. Be able to provide information about your sponsor (if you have one).
    • If someone else is paying for your trip (a friend or relative who resides in your destination country, your school or office), you should be able to support this with documents.
    • Have their complete names, addresses, and contact information handy during the interview.
  8. If traveling as a government worker, secure the necessary clearances and other permits.
    • If you are a public school teacher, barangay councilor, etc., keep your clearance or travel permit handy during your interview.  Failure to present a travel clearance could prevent you from boarding your flight.
    • Private employees must have sufficient documents to prove they are employed and have been granted leave by their employers.
  9. Review your travel history.
    • If you have been traveling for some time, review your old passports and be able to recall your most recent trips.  First time travelers must be consistent in their reason for traveling abroad (will visit parents who live abroad, giving myself a break, would like to experience snow, etc.).
    • Any history of being offloaded in the past could raise red flags.  You need to be able to state the reason why you were denied your flight in the past and how the issue was resolved.
  10. Watch your attitude.
    • Avoid getting into an argument with the Immigration Officer.
    • Answer politely at all times.
    • Do not attempt to bribe the officer in order to get past inspection.

Immigration Officers are there to help keep the safety and security of travelers.  It is our obligation to submit to their inspection and provide them with truthful statements and authentic documents, if only to prove that our trip is what we declared it to be: tour, business trip, emergency, etc.

These are tips that can help travelers better prepare for their flights and be able to enjoy a hassle-free journey to their destinations.  The decision to detain a passenger and prevent him from taking his flight is entirely the discretion of the Immigration Officers or any other circumstances that may arise even if the passenger has met all the items listed in this article.

Source: https://www.pinoy-ofw.com/news/35048-9-tips-to-avoid-offloading-at-naia.html

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01-10-2

No one can really say if there is a definite means to avoid getting questioned at your point of entry when travelling as a tourist.  We did a research on the types of documents that are often asked of Filipino travelers and some basic reminders to avoid being detained unnecessarily at Immigration points.  We hope this article helps in shedding light to your questions about getting through Immigration and points of entry.

Required Documents:

  1. Passport issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA)
    • Not expired
    • Must be valid for six (6) months from the date of departure.
  2. Visa
    • If required at the tourist’s destination
    • Must not be expired
  3. Return ticket
    • Backpackers (or tourists who will be hopping from one country to another) still need to present a return ticket as this will also be asked of them upon arrival at the different countries they will be traveling to.
    • It serves as proof that the tourist does not intend to stay in that country illegally or any longer than his visa permits him.
    • If tourist fails to show a return ticket, he may be denied entry to his destination country.

Prepare to be asked for additional documents at your point of entry.

When my mom travelled to the US as a tourist for the first time, she was questioned at the Immigration by an officer because of a letter found in her handbag.  Apparently, one of her co-workers asked her to hand-carry an envelope to a relative who lives in the same city where my mom will be staying.  One of the immigration officers asked to unseal the letter and read it.  The co-worker mentioned in her letter that my mom will be staying in the U.S. to work and tour.

My mom had a return ticket, her passport was updated, and she had a 1-year multiple entry visa to the U.S.  Still, she was held for questioning because of the letter that she agreed to deliver as a favor for a friend.

Good thing my mom was carrying the same set of documents she presented at the U.S. Embassy when she was interviewed for her tourist visa.  These and her firm statement that she does not intend to work in the U.S. at all somehow convinced the Immigration officers that she is telling the truth.  She stressed that she had been working for 25 years straight and it’s time she gave herself a break.  She said that she does not know what her co-worker’s intentions were and that the letter was sealed when it was handed to her, she accepted it based only on trust and confidence.  They let her go after two hours of more questions and several calls to my mom’s office in the Philippines.

Of course, not all travelers are as lucky as my mom and not all Immigration officers are as trusting as the one assigned to her.  So just to be on the safe side, consider the following tips when traveling as a tourist:

  1. Be familiar with your itinerary and study the places you will be visiting by heart. Some travelers get in trouble at their point of entry when they fail to mention even one attraction they intend to visit.
  2. Never ever attempt to show a fake I.D.
  3. Immigration officers also consider the following details when assessing the traveler, as a means to arrest instances of human trafficking, smuggling, and illegal recruitment:
    • Traveler’s age and health condition
    • Educational attainment
    • Financial capacity to travel
    • Travel history (if any)
    • Final destination

Again, these are reminders and tips gathered from frequent travelers and should not be taken as the standard list of requirements to avoid being held by an Immigration officer.  As travelers, it is our responsibility to prepare all necessary documents that will attest to the purpose of our trip and our sincere intention to come back to our country.  When preparing your file, keep in mind the following pointers:

Immigration officers will want to make sure of three things:

  1. That you can afford your trip;
  2. That you are traveling only for your stated purpose (tourism); and
  3. That you are coming back to the Philippines.

Based on my mom’s experience, it is best to have the following documents handy when you are lined up at the Immigration center of your destination:

  • Your old passports to show that you have traveled before and you came back to the Philippines.
  • Round-trip ticket with receipt or any other proof that the ticket is fully paid.
  • Hotel reservations, with receipt and other proof that your accommodations are fully paid.
  • Bank statements and bank certifications, if available. Again, the amount of money you have in your account does not guarantee a seamless encounter with your Immigration Officer.  You may need to justify how much you intend to spend on the trip and if you would still have enough left in your account when you come home.
  • Proof of ownership of assets.
  • Certificate of employment and approved leave of absence, photocopies of your company ID and the IDs of the people who signed your employment certificates.
  • Income Tax Return
  • Tour itinerary.
  • Marriage certificate and birth certificates of your children.

Visit us again for more articles about passports, visas, and traveling abroad.

Source: http://smalltowngirlsmidnighttrains.com/

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Manila City Hall_13

If you were the firstborn in your family but your birth certificate states that you have siblings older than you, then you need to have that entry corrected as soon as possible.  The birth order determines how many children your mother has already had and the succession of each child in the family tree.

Here are the steps to follow when filing a petition to correct your birth order on your birth certificate:

(a). 2 latest certified LCR copies and 2 latest PSA copies of birth certificate to be corrected.

(b). 2 latest certified copies of birth certificate of all brothers and sisters of the document owner.

(c). 2 latest original or certified copies of Obstetrical record, Medical Records, and Pre-natal Records from the hospital and/or OB GYNE.

(d). 2 photocopies of any of the following documents of the parents where all their children are indicated as their beneficiary and arranged according to birth order:

  • SSS
  • GSIS
  • BIR
  • Philhealth
  • Private Insurance

(e). 2 copies of valid IDs of the petitioner and the document owner and 1 copy of latest Community Tax Certificate from the place of work or residence.

(f). SPA (Special Power of Attorney).  If the petitioner is abroad or sick, he/she can be represented by lawyer or his/her nearest relative (up to third degree of consanguinity).

REMINDERS

  1. All civil documents (Birth, Marriage, and Death) to be submitted should be the latest certified local copy of Security Paper from the PSA.
  2. After the compliance of the requirements, please proceed to the information counter and get a number for the pre-interview and bring the original copies of the supporting documents (Personal Records).  Only applicants with complete requirements will be entertained for pre-interview.
  3. Steps to follow will be provided after the Final Interview.
  4. Processing of the petitions is four (4) months and will commence on the date the petition is received by the Manila City Hall.
  5. Payments are as follows:
    • Registration Fee – P1,000
    • Certified Xerox Copy – P230
    • Transmittal Fee – P210
    • Additional Payment – P30

The City Hall does not conduct interviews during Fridays.

Source: http://manila.gov.ph/services/civil-registry/

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How Often Should I Get A BC

When I had my MRP passport renewed two weeks ago, I was required to bring a copy of my PSA birth certificate.  As the one I had on file is already a bit old (with tears on the corners and some entries have faded over time), I was left with no choice but to have a new, fresh copy delivered to me instead.  I was glad to have an excuse to finally secure a new copy of my birth certificate.  I received my order from PSAHelpline.ph after two days, in time for my appointment with the DFA.

I prepared a photocopy of my birth certificate and brought the original one for verification.  When the interviewer took my documents, I was surprised to find out that they will also be keeping the original copy of my PSA birth certificate (apart from the photocopy that I prepared).  I asked the interviewer why they need to take the original copy; she said that since I am renewing an MRP passport, my renewal is considered a new application and therefore, they need to collect the original copy of my identification (the birth certificate).  I offered the old copy of my birth certificate (the frayed one) instead but she said that the DFA requires the document to be in the most recent SECPA (Security Paper).  I had no choice but to surrender the brand new copy of my birth certificate.

When I left the DFA office, I was both happy and disappointed: happy because I’ve crossed out one major item from the to-do list (get your passport renewed), disappointed because I again do not have a copy of my PSA birth certificate.

Before I placed a new order to have my PSA document delivered, I searched online if there are any differences with the old copy I got from NSO before and the new one that I submitted to the DFA.  I just wanted to understand why the DFA would not honor the NSO copy I was offering them.

I came across a press statement made by PSA, explaining that birth certificates do not have “expiration dates” (unlike Certificate of No Marriage which is only valid for six months) because the details contained in this document do not change and cannot be altered.  Even when there have been changes in the details (like correction of misspelled entries, changes in names, legitimation), these are indicated only as annotations on the original copy.

If there had been any changes on the copies (if I were to compare the old copy from NSO and new one I got recently), it would only be the color of the Security Paper and the new logo of the PSA.  According to the press statement, these changes are implemented to prevent the spread of fake PSA birth certificates.  The new features of the document do not nullify the validity of an old copy you may already have in your files.  Whichever copy you are holding, whether sealed with the logo of the former NSO or the new PSA, you can be sure that it is a valid copy of your birth certificate as long as it was acquired through an authorized PSA partner like PSAHelpline.ph.

The PSA also emphasized that they do not have control over the specific requirements of agencies and establishments that require “updated” copies of PSA birth certificates (like DFA).  There are a multitude of reasons why some offices require that we execute new copies of our documents, including birth certificates.

So that answered my question.

After this experience, I ordered two copies of my PSA birth certificate: one for my files and the other as a ready document should I be required to submit an original copy anytime soon.

I suggest you do the same so you can always be sure that you have a copy of your birth certificate on file.

The PSAHelpline.ph delivers your PSA documents in two to three days.  You may visit their website or call their hotline at 02-737-1111.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/content/press-statement-issue-civil-registry-documents-such-birth-death-and-marriage-certificates

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