Tag Archive: PSAHelpline Delivery


1 Jan 03 C

Parents are obligated to register their babies as soon as possible, after birth.  By law, you should be able to properly register the details of your child’s birth within 30 days from the date of his birth.

Here’s how:

How to register a newborn baby born in a hospital:

  1. Be ready with your baby’s name.

The parent or parents should have already decided on the baby’s name weeks before it is born.  Write it on a piece of paper or save it in your phone’s note app so that the nurses and other attending personnel at the hospital would know how to spell your child’s name.

For your child’s sake, avoid giving him or her a complicated name – one that is too long and hard to spell.  You are only increasing the risk of the baby’s name getting misspelled in his or her Certificate of Live Birth and in other transactions as he or she grows up.

  1. Prepare the documentary requirements in advance.

Among the documents that the hospital may require from you are:

  1. PSA Marriage Certificate of parents (if married)
  2. Affidavit of Admission of Paternity filled out and signed by the father (if parents are not married but the father wants the child to use his last name).
  3. Private Handwritten Instrument or an official document that is handwritten and signed by the father to prove that he wholeheartedly recognizes the paternity of the child during his lifetime (again, if the parents are not married but the father would like to recognize the child as his and allows the child to use his last name in the birth certificate).
  4. Affidavit to Use the Surname of the Father filled out and signed by the father (the blank form will be provided by the hospital).
  5. Photocopies of the parents’ valid IDs.
  6. SSS, PhilHealth, and health insurance/HMO claim forms.

The affidavits executed by the biological father (in case the child is born illegitimate) shall be permanently attached to the child’s birth certificate.

  1. Accomplish the Certificate of Live Birth (COLB) Form.

The details of the birth, such as date and hour of birth, names of attending doctors and nurses, weight and gender of the baby, shall be provided by the attending physician, nurse, or hospital administrator.  When the parents are handed the COLB, these details must already be clearly written on the form.

The parents shall fill out the rest of the form, including:

  • Name of the baby.
  • Complete names of parents (as they appear on the parents’ PSA marriage certificate and individual PSA birth certificates).
  • Parents’ religion, occupation, citizenship, date, and place of marriage (if the parents are married).

Double-check all entries before submitting the form to the hospital administrator.  Any misspelled name or address, or incorrect dates, initials, or any other detail, shall remain as is (incorrect or misspelled) until your child’s birth certificate is submitted to and certified by the PSA.  These mistakes could cause tremendous problems to your child in the future while some might even have to go through court hearings just to rectify the errors.  So take time to review all entries in your child’s birth certificate before submitting them to the hospital.

The hospital should be able to submit the accomplished COLB to the local civil registrar (LCR) within 30 days after the child’s birth date, otherwise, the child’s registration shall be marked late.

  1. Secure your copy of your child’s Certificate of Live Birth (COLB).

This should be the same copy received by the LCR and duly submitted by the hospital where you gave birth.  If the hospital has not contacted you regarding this 30 days after you give birth, follow it up with them.

The LCR’s job is to endorse your child’s COLB to the PSA so that your child would have a PSA-certified birth certificate.

  1. Get a copy of your child’s PSA Birth Certificate.

The process of endorsing and generating a PSA birth certificate takes about 3 to 6 months to complete.  It would be safe to start checking with the PSA four months after you give birth (assuming the LCR has diligently submitted your child’s COLB on time.).

Your child’s first PSA birth certificate may be obtained at the PSA main office in East Avenue, Quezon City.

We shall also feature the process on how to register a baby’s birth if he or she is born at home.

If you have any questions about birth certificate registration, just drop us a line and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.filipiknow.net

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4 Apr 15

Mayors of Metro Manila have set the speed limit to 60 kilometers per hour on main thoroughfares in the National Capital Region.  This applies to all types of vehicles, except buses and trucks.  Currently, the maximum allowable speed on national roads is 80kph.  According to the MMDA, the speed limit is being implemented as a means to address road mishaps and car crashes that could have been prevented if drivers were not going too fast.

The speed limit shall be strictly implemented in the following roads:

  1. Circumferential Roads
  • Recto Avenue
  • President Quirino Avenue
  • Araneta Avenue
  • EDSA
  • C.P. Garcia Avenue
  • Southeast Metro Manila Expressway
  1. Radial Roads
  • Roxas Boulevard
  • Taft Avenue
  • South Luzon Expressway
  • Shaw Boulevard
  • Ortigas Avenue
  • Magsaysay Boulevard/Aurora Boulevard
  • Quezon Avenue/Commonwealth Avenue
  • A. Bonifacio Avenue
  • Rizal Avenue
  • Delpan/Marcos/McArthur Highway

The MMDA said that the policy is technically effective five days after it was publicized last April 4 (Thursday).  They are still currently disseminating the information to all motorists and then will announce when it shall be enforced.

Upon official implementation, the MMDA shall fine drivers that will go beyond the said speed limit Php 1,000 for each apprehension.

This new policy does not include buses and trucks; the speed limit of which is still 50kph.

We shall update this blog as soon as the MMDA has announced that the speed limit is already officially implemented.

Do you agree that reducing the speed limit on national roads will help address car accidents in Metro Manila?

 

Source:

www.mmda.gov.ph

https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/

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2 Feb 13

Most people think that a misspelled name in a birth certificate can be easily rectified by filing a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error, as stipulated in RA 9048.  However, there are cases when misspelled names may only be corrected through a court proceeding and with the assistance of a lawyer.

Correcting vs. Changing

A typographical error, a misplaced or missing letter, or an error that causes the name to sound funny, unintelligible, and downright erroneous, can be corrected by filing a Petition for Correction.  This is done at the Local Civil Registry office of the person’s birthplace.

If the error causes the name to change, but can still be considered as a valid name, it may not be counted a typo error.  This means that you will have to seek the advice of a lawyer and the case may have to undergo a court proceeding in order for the name’s spelling to be corrected.

Example:

The child’s name is Lea but the name printed on her birth certificate is Lhea.  Both spellings can be considered as ‘correct’ but since the child’s name is Lea and not Lhea, you will essentially be requesting for the name to be ‘changed’ instead of corrected.  Changing a name in a birth certificate (whether first, middle, or last name) has to undergo court proceedings; the changes will be applied after the court has decided on the petition.

This is the reason why would-be parents need to carefully check the Certificate of Live Birth document that is usually accomplished by the hospital.  Whatever is written there will be considered as true and correct by the LCR and will then reflect in the child’s birth certificate for the rest of his life.  Correcting entries can be time-consuming and expensive; this can be avoided by diligently checking all entries in the document before submitting to the LCR and by making sure that the birth certificate owner uses the same information in his or her birth certificate in all of his IDs and transactions, for the rest of his life.  Any discrepancy between the entries in the birth certificate and his IDs and other documents could cause delays and denials in his applications and transactions.

Who Shall File the Correction or Change (of first name’s spelling):

  • Owner of the record
  • Owner’s spouse
  • Children
  • Parents
  • Siblings
  • Grandparents
  • Guardians
  • Any other person duly authorized by law or by the owner of the document sought to be corrected;
  • If the owner of the record is a minor or physically or mentally incapacitated, the petition may be filed by his spouse, or any of his children, parents, siblings, grandparents, guardians, or persons duly authorized by law.

Where to file the petition for correction:

If born in the Philippines:

  • The petition shall be filed with the local civil registry office of the city or municipality where the birth is registered.
  • When the petitioner had already migrated to another place within the Philippines and it would not be practical for such party to appear in person with the civil registrar of the place of birth, the petition may be filed with the civil registry office where he/she is currently residing.

If born abroad:

  • The petitioner may file at the Philippine Consulate where the birth was reported.

Supporting Documents:

  • Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  • Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voters’ affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/police clearance, civil registry records of ascendants;
  • Notice/Certificate of Posting;
  • Payment of Php 1,000 as the filing fee.  For petitions filed abroad, a fee of USD 50 or equivalent value in local currency shall be collected;
  • Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

We have a summary of solutions to the most common PSA birth certificate problems!  Read our blog, Common PSA Birth Certificate Problems (and their solutions!).

Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

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Mar 07

Getting sick is inevitable.  Whether you are an employee, a business person, or a stay-at-home parent, you will eventually have to take some rest to recuperate from a viral or bacterial infection.  Other times, you might get injured at work and will need some time off to heal and rehabilitate before you are able to go back to your normal daily routine.

The good news is, if you are a member of the SSS, you are entitled to sickness benefits to help you defray expenses when your capacity to earn is lessened due to being confined in bed, a wheelchair, or a hospital.

How to know if you are qualified for SSS Sickness Benefits?

  1. You have to be an SSS member.
  2. You have been sick or are injured and unable to work; you have been confined in a hospital or at home for at least 4 days.
  3. Your contributions are updated or have at least paid three months of monthly contributions before your illness or injury.
  4. All your “leave with pay” credits have been used up.
  5. Your employer is duly notified of your sickness or injury; if unemployed, voluntary, or self-employed, you must have notified SSS prior to claiming.

If your answer to all five qualifiers is “yes”, you can proceed to the nearest SSS branch to apply for the sickness benefit.

How do I notify the SSS about my illness or injury?

For EMPLOYED members:

An employed member must advise his or her employer within five calendar days of his sickness or injury.  It is the employer’s obligation to advise SSS of the employee’s condition.

  • Should you fail to notify your employer within the five-day timeframe, your confinement will be considered to have started five days before you notified him.
  • If the employer fails to notify the SSS within the five-day timeframe, your employer will be compensated only for each day of confinement from the 10th calendar day prior to notifying SSS.
  • If you notified your employer but he failed to notify the SSS and as a result, your benefits were denied, he or she must not be able to recover your daily sickness allowance.

For SELF-EMPLOYED members:

You must notify the SSS within five days after getting sick or injured.  If you are confined in a hospital, you have one year to notify the SSS.

What are the requirements when filing?

For EMPLOYED members:

Submit the following to your HR or to your company’s representative to SSS:

  1. Duly accomplished sickness notification.
  2. Identification card/s and documents (ex: PSA birth certificate)
  3. Medical documents, if any.

If the claim is work-related (or if you incurred the sickness or injury at work):

  1. Accident/sickness report from the employer, if work-connected; and
  2. Police Report (for a vehicular accident with third party involvement);
  3. Photocopy of employer’s logbook.

In case of prolonged confinements or sickness, original/certified true copy of the following:

  • Laboratory, X-ray, ECG, and other diagnostic results.
  • Operating room/clinical records that will support the diagnosis.

In case of sickness that occurred while on strike/shutdown, the member will file the necessary documents directly at the SSS.  He or she must submit the above requirements, including the following:

  • Certificate of Notice of Strike issued by the DOLE.
  • Certificate of Foreclosure.
  • Certification from the DOLE that the employee or employer has a pending labor case.
  • Certificate of Non-advancement of Payment from Employer.

For SELF-EMPLOYED Members:

  1. Duly accomplished Sickness Benefit Application (SBA)
  2. If filed by the member, present original of any one (1) of the primary ID cards/documents or two (2) secondary ID cards/documents, both with signature and at least one (1) with a photo.
  3. If filed by member’s representative:
    1. Original of any one of the Authorized Representative’s primary ID cards/documents or two secondary ID cards/documents, both with signature and at least one with a photo.
    2. Original of any one of the Member’s Primary ID cards/documents or two secondary ID cards/documents, both with signature and at least one with a photo.
  4. In case of prolonged confinements or sickness, original/certified true copy of the following:
    1. Laboratory, X-ray, ECG and other diagnostic results.
    2. Operating room/clinical records that will support the diagnosis.

How much will I receive from the SSS?

The amount you will receive will be equal to 90& of your average daily salary credit.  For example: if your average daily credit is Php 1,000, then you will receive Php 900 per day of sickness or confinement.

If you are an employed member, your employer should give you the sickness benefit in advance.

The sickness benefit is granted up to a maximum of 120 days in one calendar year.

 

Reference: http://www.sss.gov.ph

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Feb 08-a

Question: Can I apply for a passport even if my gender in my PSA birth certificate is wrong? I can have this corrected but that will take time. I already have an appointment with the DFA and I need my passport asap.

Answer: You may go ahead and appear at the DFA on the date of your appointment, bring all the required IDs and supporting documents as listed in the passport.gov. website.  You may be required by the DFA to submit an Affidavit of Undertaking in support of your claim that your birth certificate is undergoing a correction. Take note that the DFA may also simply advise you to come back when a copy of your birth certificate is already available.  It is up to you to explain to them why you still cannot execute a copy of the document.

Question: My wife and I will be accompanying our 3-year-old son for his passport application. Can we both access the priority lane so we can have our passports renewed at the same time?

The Priority Lanes at DFA offices are reserved for Senior Citizens, OFWs, PWDs, pregnant women, and children below 7 years old.  Only one companion is allowed to be with the applicant inside the DFA premises; only this companion may take advantage of the no-appointment privilege.

Question: My middle and last names were interchanged in my birth certificate so that my last name appears to be my middle name, and my middle name appears to be my last name.  What do I do? 

This can be corrected by filing a Petition for Correction at the LCR of the city or municipality where the birth was registered.  It would be wise to prepare copies of your parents’ PSA birth certificates as well to serve as supporting documents to your petition.

Question: When our daughter was born, we weren’t married yet.  We placed a false date of marriage in our daughter’s birth registration. Now we are already married, how do we correct the date of marriage in our child’s birth certificate?

Never, under any circumstance, place false information in your civil registry documents.  These types of cases need to be referred to a lawyer and may undergo a court proceeding.

Question: My child is 2 years old and is already registered at the LCR.  Can I add three more letters to his name when I get his PSA birth certificate?  Is there a fee for this and how much?

If the error is considered clerical (typographic error), you may simply file a petition for correction.  However, if the petitioner wants to “change” the name (in this case, add a few letters to the original name), you will be asked by the LCR why you wish to do so.  Your request may be granted (or denied!), depending on the veracity of your reason for changing the name.

Question: Will the DFA accept the LCR petition letter as proof that the spelling of my name in my birth certificate is already in process. I already have an appointment for passport interview.

No.  You will have to wait until your PSA birth certificate is made available.  The DFA will only accept birth certificates in PSA Security Paper.

Question: Can we apply for the late registration of birth certificate of a deceased person?  We need his birth certificate so we can claim the death benefits. 

You will have to explain to the LCR why you need to “late register” the birth of a deceased person.  Normally, this type of request is not allowed.

Question: I am scheduled to pick up my PSA birth certificate on February 13, 2018 between 1PM to 4PM at the Releasing Area, 5th floor of PSA Sta. Mesa. However, I can’t make it to Manila on the said date.  Is it okay if I pick it up after February 13?

Yes.  Requested PSA documents are kept on file for 30 days until the requesting party comes to claim the document.  PSA reserves the right to dispose of the documents if these remain unclaimed for more than 30 days.

Question: When I was 18 years old, I was “married” to my girlfriend who was only 17 years old then. We separated a few years later and I found out she got married to another man. I am planning to marry my partner too but when I requested for my CENOMAR, the details of my previous marriage are written on the document.  When I asked my ex, she said that her CENOMAR did not show the same.  What do I do?

In order for you to be allowed to remarry, your previous marriage must be dissolved by virtue of an annulment.  There is a huge possibility that your petition for an annulment will be easily granted because both you and your ex-wife were underage at the time you were supposedly married.

Question: I had my birth certificate “endorsed” by the LCR to the PSA.  How many days or weeks or months does it usually take before I am able to get a PSA copy of my birth certificate?

Normally, a week after you are given a copy of the finality an endorsement with the courier receipt by the LCR, you may begin following up at the PSA Sta. Mesa office, building 2.  Bring all the documents given to you by the LCR as proof of your transaction.

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Jan 08 (3)

Errors in your civil registry documents could adversely affect your transactions with the government or private establishments.  Often, erroneous birth certificates and other documents from the PSA are referred to the LCR of the place where the birth, death, or marriage was originally recorded.  Misspelled names and other obvious clerical corrections are rectified through a Petition for Correction of Clerical Error while more complicated cases are referred to a legal counsel or, sometimes, are heard in court.

One way or the other, the error is corrected or the missing information is supplied, and the owner of the civil registry document is then able to acquire an accurate copy of his PSA certificate.

After the correction process is completed, can the owner get a copy of his PSA document by ordering online or over the phone?

Why are there cases where even after the owner has satisfied all of the LCR’s requirements to apply the needed correction, the PSA’s copy of the same document remains erroneous?

We did our research and found out that the first corrected copy of any civil registry document (birth, death, marriage) that underwent correction or legal proceeding must be claimed at the PSA head office located at the Solicarel Building along Ramon Magsaysay Avenue, in Sta. Mesa, Manila.  Your best landmark is the LRT Pureza Station.

The first corrected copies must be claimed personally by the owner or the requesting party at the head office.  This too will trigger the PSA to provide the corrected copy of your succeeding requests that can then be done online or by phone (www.psahelpline.ph).  If you will insist on getting a corrected copy by ordering online, you will always get the old, erroneous copy.

If you have advised the LCR of the correction on your civil registry document but are still getting the erroneous copy from the PSA, chances are the corrected copy was not properly endorsed to the PSA.  If this happens, go back to the LCR where you filed the correction and ask for a copy of the endorsement made for your documents.  If they are able to provide you one, bring it to the PSA head office and use it as a supporting document for your request.  If the LCR does not have an endorsement, that means that the corrections applied to your civil registry certificate have not been properly communicated to the PSA yet.  Advise the LCR to endorse the corrected copy and inquire how long you need to wait before you may request for the corrected authenticated copy from the PSA.

Make sure to bring an endorsement from the LCR where the correction was initiated (usually, the LCR of the city or municipality where you were born or married) when requesting for the first corrected copy of your document.

If you have questions about PSA documents such as birth, marriage, death, and CENOMAR, send us a message and we will find the best answers for you.

Reference: http://www.psa.gov.ph

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09 - 19

For three years now, the government has been hosting earthquake drills all over the country to spread awareness and encourage defensive responses in the event of an earthquake.  The drill is headed by the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Center (NDRRMC) and this year, it will be held at the Strike Gymnasium in Bacoor City, Cavite.  Although the activities are focused in Metro Manila and nearby areas, the entire country is encouraged to participate whether they are in their offices, homes, and even while on the road.

For most of us, our response during the earthquake drill (and during an earthquake!) should be to “duck, cover, and hold”.  But how about if you are driving a vehicle when an earthquake strikes?  How do you protect yourself from the damaging effects of this anticipated disaster while inside a moving car?

We are sharing the following article below to help drivers and commuters be aware of the safest, most defensive response when caught on the road by an earthquake.  Share this to all your friends and families whose jobs require them to be behind the wheel most of the time.

Step 1: Be aware of the intensity of the earthquake.

Drivers will not feel tremors as fast as people in buildings would.  A good indicator that an earthquake is happening is when you feel your vehicle wobble like it has a flat tire.  Pay attention to hanging streetlights and road signs too; any unusual swinging and shaking could mean a strong quake is happening.

Step 2: Pull to the side of the road.

Do not just stop in the middle of the street to avoid getting in other drivers’ way.  Do your best to pull to the side of the road, avoiding tall structures, poles, and lamp posts.  This means that even in the middle of the emergency, you have to remain calm and composed to make sure you and your car are secured and safe.

Step 3: Switch off your engine and put your handbrake on.

This gives you a bit of time to collect your belongings in case you’d need to flee from your car (which is most likely if the quake is at intensity 5 or higher).  Be prepared to exit and leave your vehicle.

Step 4: Proceed to the nearest open area you can find.

When it is safe to leave your car, head to an open area.  Avoid seeking refuge under flyovers, footbridges, and near lamp posts or hanging streetlights as these structures could give way anytime.

Step 5: Check for internet access to get the latest news on situations on the road, your destination, and nearby areas. 

After a strong quake, people are most likely to conjure up the worst scenarios through hearsays and well, superstitious beliefs.  These are the last things you need to hear as it will waste your time and may cause you to panic.  If you have your mobile phone with you, check for internet access and get the latest news from reliable sources.  Call your family at home, locate your children, and ensure everyone’s safety while you still have batteries on your phone.  Plan a meeting place that is accessible to your family and start moving.

We hope the NDRRMC and the MMDA would also conduct earthquake drills that are designed for motorists, private, and public vehicle drivers.  This will help save a lot of commuters’ lives when an earthquake strikes while they are in major thoroughfares such as EDSA, Commonwealth Avenue, NLEX, SLEX, and the like.

Most people take earthquake drills for granted; this is sad news.  We all know that earthquakes are unpredictable disasters, unlike typhoons and volcanic eruptions, and the only way you can get a fighting chance to survive is to be aware of what must be done while the ground is shaking and causing damages and panic all around you.  If your company is participating in the drill, take it as a chance to be familiar with your building’s entry and exit points, safe hiding places, and escape routes.  If you are at home during the drill, encourage all family members to join in as well.

If you are joining the earthquake drill on Thursday (and we hope you will!), you can share your stories with us right here at the Master Citizen blog page!

References:

www.ndrrmc.gov.ph

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02-08

A passport applicant was denied because her name on her birth certificate did not match any of the IDs and clearances she presented to the DFA.  Why is this so?

Janine’s parents’ marriage was annulled shortly after she turned one year old.  After the annulment, her mother immediately reverted to using her maiden last name.  Since the mother had sole custody of Janine, she decided to drop the father’s last name and had Janine use her maiden name in all of her records instead.

Now, at 34 years old, Janine applied for her passport (for the first time) and was shocked when she was told her application was denied.  According to the DFA, the name on her birth certificate and the names on the rest of her documents and IDs do not match.  And because of this, she needs to have her birth certificate amended first before her application could be entertained.

Janine was willing to just use her name as it appears on her birth certificate but they explained to her that this could not be done.  The DFA verifies a person’s identity against all of the documents and IDs required of an applicant and since her names do not match, they could not issue her a passport.

What are the requirements when applying for a passport for the first time?

  1. Personal appearance of applicant.
  2. Confirmed appointment
  3. Duly accomplished application form (may be downloaded from the DFA website).
  4. Birth Certificate in PSA Security Paper (SECPA) or Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar (LCR) and duly authenticated by the PSA.
  5. Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity such as:
    • Government-issued picture IDs:
      • Digitized SSS ID
      • Driver’s License
      • GSIS E-card
      • PRC ID
      • IBP ID
      • OWWA ID
      • Digitized BIR ID
      • Senior Citizen’s ID
      • Unified Multi-purpose ID
      • Voter’s ID
      • Old College ID
      • Alumni ID
      • Old Employment IDs
    • And at least two of the following:
      • PSA Marriage Contract
      • Land Title
      • Seaman’s Book
      • Elementary or High School Form 137 or Transcript of Records with readable dry seal.
      • Government Service Record
      • NBI Clearance
      • Police Clearance
      • Barangay Clearance
      • Digitized Postal ID
      • Readable SSS-E1 Form or Microfilmed Copy of SSS E1 Form
      • Voter’s Certification, List of Voters and Voter’s Registration Record
      • School Yearbook

Janine presented her PSA Birth Certificate, her college IDs, her company ID, and her Voter’s ID.  Of the four, only her birth certificate shows her last name as that of her father’s while the rest were all her mother’s maiden last name.

She was advised to proceed to the Local Civil Registry where her birth was registered and inquire about the processes involved in changing her surname (as a result of the nullification of her parents’ marriage).  Once her birth certificate has been duly annotated with the necessary changes (on her last name), she may apply for her passport once again.

Source: http://www.dfa.gov.ph/index.php/2013-04-04-06-59-48

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