Tag Archive: dfa passport application


2 Feb 27

Last year, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) tweaked the passport appointment process a bit so that applicants are required to confirm their appointments by paying for their passports before their appointment dates.  In the past, applicants have the liberty to book an appointment’s date and time, appear before a DFA consul, and then pay for their passport only after they have completed all required processes.  This has been observed to be one of the reasons why some applicants do not keep their commitment to appear before the DFA.  Because they can simply book another slot, they just ignore their set appointments, never mind that others are not able to book their own because all slots are already filled.

To discourage no-shows and help the agency better manage the appointment slots, the DFA placed the payment of the passport at the onset of the application process.  This time, after you have successfully reserved your slot, you have 24 hours to pay your passport fee in order for the DFA’s system to confirm your appointment.  Non-payment within the prescribed timeline will mean that you have decided against your appointment and your slot will be released for others to claim.

But what happens if you fail to appear before the DFA even after you have already made a payment?  Can you refund the passport fee?  Can you have your appointment moved to another date?

According to the DFA, they follow a No Show, No Refund policy on booked appointment slots.  They may, however, entertain appeals to accommodate applicants who have valid reasons for missing their appointment, but these are on a case-to-case basis.

Also, make sure to bring all required documents and IDs on your appointment date.  Incorrect and incomplete requirements can also keep you from completing the application process and your appointment will be as good as canceled.  No refund for such cases as well.

Here are some important reminders when applying for or renewing your passport at the DFA:

  1. Have your passport renewed at least six months before the expiry date.
  2. Make sure that all information on your application form, birth, and or marriage certificates, and IDs are true, correct, and accurately spelled and dated. If there are discrepancies, have these corrected first.
  3. Have a valid and active Yahoo or Google Mail account ready when making an appointment online.
  4. Remove accessories such as necklaces, earrings, and colored contact lenses when appearing before the DFA consul, up until your photos have been taken.
  5. Make sure that the information on the data page of your new passport is all correct before affixing your signature. The consul will let you check this before finalizing your data page.

For more information on passport applications and renewal, visit the DFA website at www.dfa.gov.ph

Reference:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph

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02-13

The DFA will always refer to the authenticated copy of our PSA birth certificate for the accuracy and completeness of our names.  The name, and how it is written, on the birth certificate is what will appear on the passport.

Miguel Oben is an illegitimate child.  He has always used his mother’s last name as his surname (Oben); he leaves the middle name field blank in all of his documents and IDs.  When he applied for a passport, he was required to present a copy of his PSA birth certificate.  He was shocked to find that his name on his birth certificate is Miguel Villanueva Oben – Villanueva being his biological father’s last name!  He verified this against the copy of the LCR where his birth was registered and got the same results.  When he presented his birth certificate to the DFA, his passport application was denied.

What must be done in such cases?

Miguel was left with no choice but to have the issue on his birth certificate rectified at the Local Civil Registry where his birth was registered.  Since he is an illegitimate child and his father’s name does not appear on his birth certificate (except for his last name that somehow found its way to Miguel’s middle name field), he should continue carrying his mother’s last name while the middle name field must be left blank.

While waiting for the results from the Local Civil Registry (which could take between 6 months to a year), Miguel tried appealing his case to the DFA.  It turns out that he needs the passport to visit his mother who suffered a stroke in Guam, USA.  Luckily, he was able to support this claim with documents from his mother’s doctors.

Although it is not customary for the DFA to work around identity and documentary issues of passport applicants, there are certain cases when the application is reconsidered and additional documents are required.  Cases similar to Miguel’s may be required to present an Affidavit of One and The Same Person in support of the IDs and documents he presented bearing his name as Miguel Oben.  Apart from the said Affidavit, Miguel also attached a signed letter to the DFA stating that he shall be presenting the annotated copy of his birth certificate upon renewal of his passport.

Again, these kinds of issues are handled and evaluated by the DFA on a case-to-case basis.  The results of the evaluation are entirely up to the discretion of DFA’s experts.  At the end of the day, the public is expected to adhere to the policies of the DFA as published in their website and as posted in their offices.

Source: www.dfa.gov.ph

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02-09

After you have successfully satisfied all the ID and documentary requirements to obtain a new passport or have your old one renewed, you will be issued a receipt by the DFA cashier.  If you opted not to have your passport delivered to you, you will have to go back to that DFA branch to claim your passport.  The date of release is stamped on the receipt; you may come back on or after the date stated on your receipt – but not later than six months.

What happens if I fail to claim my passport after six months?

Based on DFA regulations, all unclaimed passports at the DFA main office, Philippine Overseas Employment Agency (POEA) Passport Extension Office, Regional Consular Offices (RCOs) nationwide will be considered inactive and will be disposed of after six months.

Do I need to apply for a new one again and pay the same fees?

Yes.  You need to secure an appointment online in order to be accommodated for your new passport application.  Apart from all the required IDs and documents, you also need to secure an Unclaimed List from the DFA Records Division.  This must be attached to your application documents and submitted to the DFA.

Pay the corresponding fee at the cashier and wait for your receipt.  Make sure that the release date is clearly stamped on the slip.

  • PHP 950.00 for regular processing (15 working days).
  • PHP 1,200 for rush processing (7 working days).
  • Additional PHP 150.00 if you opt to have the passport delivered to you.

What if I lose my receipt?

You need to draft a signed explanation letter to detail the reasons why you lost your receipt.  This must be presented at the releasing section on or after the release date.

Can I ask a relative or a friend to claim my passport on my behalf?

No, you have to personally appear at the DFA branch when claiming your passport.

Source:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph

http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/210509/news/nation/dfa-reminds-applicants-claim-passports-within-6-months

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02-07

A child born out of wedlock is an illegitimate child.  Under the law, such children shall carry their mother’s last name on their birth certificates unless their father provides his consent to let the child use his last name.  In cases when the parents of an illegitimate child decide to marry later on, the child’s status is effectively changed to “legitimate”.  And as a legitimzied child, he or she is given the same entitlements as that of a legitimate child, retroacting to the time of the child’s birth.  This includes the child’s right to use her father’s surname.

So how come “legitimized” children, who have been using their father’s last name since after their parents got married (after their birth), are still required to execute an AUSF (Affidavit to Use Surname of Father) if they want to use their father’s last name on their passports?  (Otherwise, their passports shall bear the last name of the mother as if their birth right is still illegitimate).

When a child is “legitimized”, certain procedures must be undertaken in order to apply the child’s father’s last name on the child’s birth certificate.  Unless the necessary amendments and attachments have been officially applied on the child’s birth certificate, her right to use her father’s last name may still be questioned.

When applying for a passport, the DFA requires a copy of the applicant’s PSA Birth Certificate.  This shall be their basis for the person’s information, including and most especially, the person’s name.  If the birth certificate is not supported by documents attesting to the fact that the person has been “legitimized”, he or she may not be able to use the father’s last name on his passport.

If you were legitimized (due to subsequent marriage of your parents), you need to accomplish the following in relation to your use of your father’s last name:

a. Visit the office of the Local Civil Registrar where your birth was registered and secure the following documents:

  • Affidavit of Paternity/Acknowledgment (certified photocopy)
  • Joint Affidavit of Legitimation
  • Certification of Registration of Legal Instrument (Affidavit of Legitimation)
  • Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate with remarks/annotation based on the legitimation by subsequent marriage.

b. Verify that the birth certificate (of the legitimated child) and the marriage contract of the parents have been certified by the PSA.  If not, secure it from the city or municipal Civil Registrar’s Office where the child was registered and where the parents were married.

When applying for a passport and you would like to use your father’s last name:

  • Bring a copy of your PSA Birth Certificate.
  • Check to make sure that your copy includes an annotation regarding your new status as legitimated.
  • If the legitimized child is still a minor, the mother must be present during the passport application.
  • If the mother is abroad, the person accompanying the child (including the father), must be able to execute the following:
    • Affidavit of Support and Consent
    • Special Power of Attorney authenticated by the Philippine Embassy in the country where the mother resides.

A legitimized child may use her father’s last name on her passport provided her PSA Birth Certificate bears the necessary annotations regarding her legitimation and documented proof that the father has allowed the child to use his last name (AUSF, Affidavit of Support and Consent).

Sources:

http://www.dfa.gov.ph/

https://psa.gov.ph/content/application-requirements

http://www.manilatimes.net/illegitimate-child-has-to-use-mothers-surname/230283/

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New Requirements for Green Passport Renewal

Para sa lahat ng naka-schedule at nagbabalak pa lamang magpa renew ng kanilang Green o Machine Readable Passports, importanteng malaman na may bagong patakaran ang Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) sa prosesong ito.

Simula noong Lunes, June 6, 2016, lahat ng domestic applications para sa renewal ng nasabing Green o Machine Readable Passports (MRP) ay mangangailangan ng mga karagdagang IDs at documentary requirements:

  • Ang aktwal na MRP o Green booklet passport
  • PSA Birth Certificate
  • At least one (1) valid identification document.
  • Iba pang supporting documents (i.e. PSA Marriage Certificate kung married ang aplikante at ginagamit ang married name sa passport.)

Siguraduhing dala ninyo ang mga dokumentong ito sa araw ng inyong appointment para maiwasan ang delays sa inyong application for passport renewal.

Tandaan din na simula noong June 1, 2016, ang sino mang hindi sumipot sa araw at oras ng kanyang naktakdang appointment for passport application and renewal ay hindi mabibigyan ng pagkakataon na mag set ng panibagong appointment sa loob ng 30 araw.  Kaya’t markahan ang inyong mga kalendaryo ayon sa appointment na inyong hiniling online para maka-iwas sa abala.

Source: http://www.passport.com.ph/info/requirements/for/renewal

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Dedicated Passport Center for OFWs

Bilang pagpapahalaga at pagbibigay prayoridad sa ating mga kababayang OFW, ang Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) ay maglalagay ng dedicated passport application center para sa mga OFW sa consular office sa Robinson’s Galleria.  Ito ay malapit lamang sa opisina ng Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA).

Ang mga OFW ay hindi na kailangan pang mag set ng appointment para mag apply ng passport o magpa renew.  Bukas ang dedicated passport application center sa lahat ng mga OFW, kahit unang beses pa lamang niyang umalis o dati nang bumibiyahe para mag trabaho.

Habang hinihintay ang official launch ng nasabing passport application center, ang mga OFW ay patuloy na gagamit ng mga courtesy lanes sa mga DFA consular offices.

Isang paalala lamang sa mga OFW na naka schedule magpa renew ng kanilang passport:  Phased out na green-colored at machine-readable passports.  Kung ganito ang huling passport na gamit at ngayon ay ipapa-renew na, ituturing na New Application ang dapat sana’y renewal lamang.  Dahil dito, kailangang mag dala ng mga documentary requirements ang aplikante tulad ng PSA Birth Certificate at iba pang documents na naka lista sa DFA website.

I-share natin ang article na ito sa lahat n gating mga kamag-anak at kaibigan na nagpa-planong mangibang bansa para mag trabaho.

Source: http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/568247/news/pinoyabroad/dfa-creates-dedicated-passport-center-for-ofws

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DFA Imposes 30

Setting an appointment with the DFA to apply for a new passport or have an old one renewed, is free of charge.  All you have to do is log on to the www.passport.com.ph website, choose a DFA branch nearest you, and block off your preferred date and time for the passport application.  It is a convenient means to secure your slot with the DFA and save yourself from waiting in line like before.

The DFA receives an average of 15,000 passport applications daily.  Sadly though, only about 53% of the appointments are fulfilled while the rest simply do not show up.  Essentially, the dates and hours these “no-shows” blocked off are wasted when it could have accommodated other passport applicants.  Since there are no fees involved in setting an appointment, anybody can just block off a schedule and then simply ignore it later on.  If they fail to make it to their original appointment, they can easily set another one, no sweat.  As a result, hundreds of applicants are left with no choice but to wait for as long as two months to be accommodated by the agency.

To address this issue, the DFA announced that those who will fail to show up for their set appointments will be barred from re-applying for 30 days.  This move aims to discourage applicants from taking their appointments for granted and not waste the available slots on the website.

The policy takes effect on June 1, 2016.

Help spread the news to your families and friends.

http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/567660/news/pinoyabroad/starting-june-1-no-show-passport-applicants-to-face-30-day-ban

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Passport for Dual Citizenship

In yesterday’s blog, we talked about the possibility of re-acquiring Filipino citizenship after becoming a naturalized citizen of another country. Such Pinoys have dual citizenship.

Today’s blog will focus on how a Filipino with dual citizenship can apply for his Philippine passport. Yes. They can have two passports – one from the country where they were naturalized and one from the Philippines.

Here’s how:

  1. Prepare the documentary requirements you will be needing; below is the list as published in www.passport.com.ph:
    • Duly accomplished passport application form
    • PSA Birth Certificate in Security Paper (SECPA) or
    • Certified True Copy (CTC) of Birth Certificate issued by the Local Civil Registrar (LCR) and duly authenticated by the PSA. Transcribed Birth Certificate from LCR is required when entries in PSA Birth Certificate are blurry or unreadable.
    • If born abroad, Report of Birth Duly Authenticated by PSA.
    • Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity.
    • Identification Certificate of Retention or Re-acquisition.
    • Oath of Allegiance
    • Order of Approval
  2. List of acceptable IDs (at least 1 of the following):
    • Government –issued picture IDs such as the following:
      • Digitized SSS ID
      • Driver’s License
      • GSIS E-card
      • PRC ID
      • IBP ID
      • OWWA ID
      • Digitized BIR ID
      • Senior Citizen’s ID
      • Unified Multi-Purpose ID (UMID)
    • Other acceptable picture IDs such as the following:
      • Old college ID
      • Alumni ID
      • Old Employment IDs

You may proceed to the DFA Aseana for your Philippine passport application. Their address is: ASEANA Business Park, Bradco Avenue corner Macapagal Boulevard, Paranaque City. Best to inform the guard of the building that you are applying for a Philippine passport as a dual citizen so they can direct you to the office where you may transact.

Lost Passport.jpg

Grace emptied her backpack as soon as she stepped into her hotel room.  She turned the bag upside down and shook out all the contents of the pockets and pouches.  She took off her jacket and cargo pants and rummaged through the pockets, even though she knew she will not find it there.

With trembling hands, she grabbed her iPad and called her cousin in the Philippines, never mind if it’s the middle of the night in Manila.

“Tulungan mo ako beh, nawala ko ang passport ko! Anong gagawin ko?” (Help me, I lost my passport! What am I supposed to do now?)

Losing your passport abroad is a serious matter.  It is your primary identification while outside your home country, a prized ID that allows you to walk through ports of entries and out of immigration offices without hassle.  In other countries, you need to show your passport before they ring up your purchase (tourists are exempted from paying taxes in some countries).  Without it, you are basically an alien, in the strictest sense of the word.

So what is a Pinoy to do when he realizes that his / her passport has gone missing while he’s abroad?  I researched (and researched some more) on how seasoned travelers handled the same situation and have compiled it here for our consumption.  Feel free to share this to friends and families who are frequent travelers.  We’d love to hear about your own experiences too!

  1. Download a copy of the passport application form from the Philippine Embassy website of the country where you are located.  Provide all needed information and make sure that all entries are spelled clearly and correctly.
  2. File a police report and have it authenticated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs where the report was filed.
  3. Get a notarized Affidavit of Loss and have this authenticated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs where the affidavit was executed.
  4. A copy of the PSA Birth Certificate of the passport holder.
  5. Other identification cards and documents to further support the identity of the applicant.
  6. A photocopy of the lost passport (if available).
  7. Prepare the processing fees which will depend on the country where you are securing the replacement passport.
  8. You might have to cancel or re-schedule some items in your itinerary. If you are there for work or business, inform you boss and colleagues of your situation and the estimated time you need to get back on track.
  9. Once you have established communication with the Philippine Embassy and have been given an estimated timeline as to when your new passport will be released to you, get in touch with your airline.  You might need to extend your stay and therefore, your plane ticket dates need to be extended too.  In Washington D.C., a 15-day waiting period is required on top of the 8 to 12-week processing period if the lost passport is still valid and if the passport was not issued by the Embassy/Consulate General where you are applying for replacement.
  10. Next is to secure the place where you will be staying while waiting for your new passport to be released.  You might need to call relatives and friends who live near the city or state where you are staying.
  11. Secure your finances.  You might want to re-think that shopping spree.  You need to have enough cash with you to last you until you are finally able to leave.
  12. Call your family and colleagues in the Philippines and update them with your whereabouts (who are you staying with, how long will you be staying there, etc.).

Pre – departure Preparations:

  1. Back up all your identification cards.  Photocopy your passport, driver’s license, your social security card, and your company ID.  Keep soft copies in your laptop and in a USB; you might also want to keep copies in your email for easy access.
  2. Consider bringing a copy of your PSA Birth Certificate and PSA Marriage Certificate (if married).  These can come in handy when securing replacement for your lost passport.  Keep soft copies in your email and electronic devices too.
  3. Your plane tickets and boarding passes must be photocopied or scanned as well.  Keep soft copies in your tablet, phone, and in your email for easy access.
  4. Take note of the phone numbers of the Philippine Embassy of your destination.  Check out their location and office hours online.

Of course, the best solution is still to take precautionary measures and to always be extra careful with your belongings especially while in a foreign land.  Losing something as important as a passport is enough to ruin an otherwise exciting trip.  Don’t lose heart when you do lose something though; remember, every problem has a solution.  You just need to be calm and collected when faced with such challenges.  And always, always arm yourself with a back-up plan.

Sources:

http://www.ofwguide.com/article_item-2346/Lost-your-passport-abroad–Get-A-New-One.html

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/index.php?page=consular-services-dc/faq-dc/

Visa.jpg

Whether it’s for pleasure or business, traveling is most often part of a young urban professional’s annual itinerary. The experiences and opportunities gathered from these trips are otherwise not offered if you remain confined in the four corners of your home or office. It could be disappointing to miss an opportunity to travel, especially if the hindrances are as petty as:

  1. You still don’t have a passport.
  2. You do have one but you’ve let it expire.
  3. You don’t have a visa.

You can easily take care of the first two reasons by simply setting an appointment at www.passport.com.ph. Prepare the necessary documents such as your PSA certified Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate (if needed), and other supporting papers.  Appear before the DFA branch you set an appointment with and then wait for your passport to be delivered to you.

Getting over the third obstacle though could be quite intimidating.  Preparing the necessary documents and appearing before the interviewer are nerve-racking thoughts but are necessary if you are serious about obtaining a visa for a particular country.

Every Pinoy will have to go through this process; and the earlier you are able to complete the requirements and conquer the dreaded interview, the better!  So to help you prepare for your visa application process, here are five tips from Rappler (http://www.rappler.com/life-and-style/travel/53687-visa-application-tips-travel).

1.File all frequently requested documents in one bag/envelope and label accordingly.

A clear book with sturdy covers can help you organize your documents. Make at least five copies of these documents and make sure that the photocopies are clear so you would not need to photocopy the original while you are at the embassy.

Documents to include in your file are:

  • PSA Certified Birth Certificate
  • PSA Certified Marriage Certificate (if annulled, you will probably need a copy of your Marriage Certificate annotated by the NSO certifying that the marriage was declared null and void).
  • Latest Income Tax Return
  • For business owners, include business permits, business license and (audited) financial statements.
  • Photocopies of previous visas you have been issued (if there are any).
  • ID pictures: Different embassies will have different size requirements, so when you have your picture taken, have the picture reproduced in different size dimensions. You can get one picture taken in the standard 2×2 white background and one in the US visa size and Schengen size. (Note that for all visa requirements, both ears must be shown and women should not be wearing earrings.)
  • Proof of income and ownership such as land titles and or car registration documents.

Your old passports with other visa stamps must also be readily available so keep these in your visa application file folder too.

2. Keep a list of the countries you have visited.

Since most embassies require for a list of the countries you have visited, it is best that you keep track of your travels, including the dates. Do not rely on your memory or pictures in your Facebook timeline! Keep a soft copy of your travel journal and update this each time you travel. Print out your most updated list and bring this with you when you go to the embassy.

3. Make a checklist of the visa application requirements.

Every country has a different set of requirements to be presented to the visa processing center. Visit the embassy’s website and collect the list of requirements for the type of visa that you are applying for in that country. Invest time and effort in making sure that you have the correct list and then, that you have the complete set of requirements on hand.

Other things that you need to pay attention to are fees you need to pay, acceptable denominations (US dollars, Euros, Pesos, etc.), and payment modes (cash, manager’s check, etc.). It is wise to bring the exact change as well since some embassies will not offer change.

Lastly, make sure that you have the correct location of the visa processing center as these change from time to time.

4. Have a standard template for letters of introduction to consuls.

Some embassies require applicants to present a letter of introduction, including therein the purpose of your travel. Create a standard template that you can update whenever you need to apply for a visa.

The letter must have the following information:

  • Header with your name, contact details and if available, your visa application reference number.
  • Reason for travel
  • Duration of stay
  • Mention of other countries you have visited
  • How you will fund your trip
  • Day by day travel itinerary as an attachment

5. Befriend your Travel Agent.

 If you are a frequent traveler, it is best that you find a travel agent that you can trust. He or she can help you save time and effort in booking tickets and hotels, finding the best plane fare deals, and other travel details you may miss.

Your journey towards acquiring a visa can be less stressful with these tips. These do not guarantee that you will be granted a visa.

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