Tag Archive: SSS ID


06 - 19

A common requirement in most government and private transactions is a copy of a Barangay Clearance and or a Barangay Certificate  Most people think these two are one and the same so they end up submitting a Certificate when they are required to submit a Clearance, and vice versa.

To help address this common confusion among Filipino citizens, we did a research and found out that these two documents are completely different from each other and are issued for different purposes.  Here is a summary of how  Barangay Clearances and Barangay Certificates are secured, and when these two are needed.  Read on!

Barangay Certificate

  • Otherwise known as Barangay Certificate of Residency.
  • This document proves that you are a resident of a particular barangay.
  • You can be issued a copy of this certificate if you have been residing in a particular barangay for at least 6 months or more.
  • This can be secured at the barangay hall that covers the applicant’s place of residence.

Barangay Clearance

  • A Barangay Clearance is a common requirement for business permits and license applications.
  • This can be secured at the barangay hall that covers the place where the business will operate.

The requirements needed for such certifications and clearances to be issued are detailed in the barangay’s Citizen’s Charter.  Common requirements are:

  • Documents pertaining to the business’ establishment
  • Community Tax Certificate
  • Valid IDs such as Driver’s License, Company ID, GSIS or SSS IDs, Voter’s ID, etc.

Note that a Voter’s ID is just one of the many IDs that may be required from an applicant.  It should not serve as the sole basis for granting a person’s request for a Certificate of Residency.

Next time you are required to submit a certification or clearance from your barangay, clarify which among the two should you submit.  Keep this as your reference in differentiating the documents you are applying for.

Source: www.dilg.gov.ph

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

 

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02-23

My Mom misplaced her Senior Citizen ID a few months ago.  She has yet to make that trip to the Quezon City hall to secure a new one and until then, she would shrug her shoulders every time she foregoes an opportunity to get a discount on her purchase.

Last month, she lined up at a bus terminal to buy a ticket for a one-way trip to La Union.  I heard her mention to the cashier that she is a Senior Citizen and that she doesn’t have her ID in her possession and for the cashier to please give her the discounted ticket price.  The cashier looked quizzically at her and said that without my Mom’s SC ID, she cannot grant her the discount.  My Mom dyes her hair a subtle shade of mahogany brown and would never leave the house without make up on.  She is 71 years old but people would always mistake her for someone who is in her mid-50s.  My Mom probably caught the cashier’s doubtful look because she immediately pulled her passport out of her bag and showed it to the ticket lady. However, without even uttering a word (or taking a glance at my Mom’s passport), the cashier punched the numbers on the ticket and handed it to my Mom.  I did not need to look at the ticket; I knew right away that she did not grant my Mom her discount.

Is the Senior Citizen ID the only required document before a Senior Citizen is granted his government-mandated discounts?

The Expanded Senior Citizen Act of 2010 (RA 9994) states that senior citizens may avail of benefits and privileges under the Act upon presenting a valid and original Senior Citizen’s ID as proof of his or her eligibility.

But does it end there?

My mom volunteered to present her passport, a document bearing her photograph, her address, and her birth date.  That should have been enough to prove that she is a senior citizen and she should be granted senior citizen discounts.

A careful review of the Implementing Rules and Regulations of RA 9994, particularly Article 5.5, will lead you to realize that there are indeed ALTERNATIVE IDs that senior citizens may present, in the absence of their SC IDs, if only to prove that they are qualified to avail of SC benefits and privileges.

Article 5.5 defines these alternative IDs as any document or proof of being a senior citizen which may be used to avail of benefits and privileges under the Act and its Rules.  It shall be any of the following:

  1. Senior Citizens’ ID card issued by the OSCA in the municipality where the elderly resides;
  2. The Philippine passport of the elderly person or senior citizen concerned; and
  3. Government-issued ID which reflects on its face the name, picture, date of birth and nationality of the senior citizen which includes any of the following:
    • Digitized Social Security System ID
    • Government Service Insurance System ID
    • Professional Regulation Commission ID
    • Integrated Bar of the Philippines ID
    • Unified Multi-purpose ID (UMID)
    • Driver’s License

Had I known these facts that day we were lined up at the ticket booth, I would have stepped up and demanded that my Mom be given her rightful privilege as a Filipino Senior Citizen.

Nonetheless, we took time off from work one Thursday morning and accompanied our 71-year-old mother to the Office of Senior Citizen Affairs at the QC Hall.  She was issued a shiny new ID that she now proudly flashes whenever she is asked, “Senior na po kayo?”

Source:

www.bir.gov.ph

http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/new-acceptable-ids-to-avail-yourself-of-senior-citizen-privileges/

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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11-03

When my uncle was granted citizenship in the U.S. by virtue of a petition filed by his daughter who is a natural born U. S. Citizen, he also elected to change his first name.  So from being a Jose Paulo de Guzman Asuncion, he is now Mark Arthur de Guzman Asuncion.

He recently celebrated his 65th birthday and is now taking an extended vacation in the Philippines.  He is technically “retired” from private employment in the U.S. but still has the option to continue working for smaller firms.

Last Monday, he requested me to help him order copies of his and my aunt’s birth certificates and two copies of their marriage certificate.  Of course, I ordered online at PSAHelpline.ph because I know they can get it done in 2 to 3 days max.  He told me to have it delivered to his home address in Quezon City and list him as the recipient.

I did as he requested and was able to successfully submit all orders in less than 15 minutes.  I went to a nearby 711 store to pay for the documents (yes! 711 accepts PSAHelpline.ph payments!) and told my uncle to just wait for the courier within the week.  I also reminded him to prepare his IDs as these will be asked of him before he receives the documents.

Later that evening while we were having dinner, my uncle showed me all the IDs he has in his envelope.  It was then that I realized that he no longer had any IDs that bore his old first name, Jose Paulo.  From his driver’s license, to his Senior Citizen ID, to his passport, he is identified as Mark Arthur De Guzman Asuncion.  Since he is declared as the owner of the ordered documents, and his name on his PSA birth certificate is Jose Paulo, he needs to show the courier a valid ID with his name listed as Jose Paulo.

We launched a major search operation in his old cabinets and desk drawers; I asked the helper to find any old IDs that do not have expiration dates and bear his name as Jose Paulo.  After turning his entire bedroom upside down, we finally saw one!  The last SSS ID he had before he left for the U.S. in 2002 was neatly kept in a box and still looked as good as new!  And, it does not have an expiration date!  Of course, his name on this ID is Jose Paulo De Guzman Asuncion.

When the PSAHelpline.ph courier arrived yesterday with the documents, my uncle was eagerly waiting by his porch with his SSS ID.  He handed this to the courier who carefully studied the ID and my uncle’s face.  The courier smiled and said: “Parang di po kayo tumatanda!”

So yes, you can use an old ID when receiving your ordered PSA documents, just as long as these are non-expiring IDs like your SSS.

My uncle, having stayed in the U.S. for 14 years, is used to quick, efficient, and hassle-free transactions.  And I must say that he was really impressed with the online ordering and delivery services of PSAHelpline.ph.  He could not believe how far the PSA has gone from being an overly crowded office with people lined up everywhere, to having an online portal where Pinoys can easily request for their documents and have these conveniently delivered wherever in the country.

He also loved being told that his photo on his old SSS ID looked like it was taken just yesterday.

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National ID System

In 2015, the House of Representatives approved House Bill No. 5060 requiring all Filipinos to be issued a national identification card.  This covers Filipinos in the country and those residing abroad.  It shall serve as the main identification of Filipinos and will be required for all government transactions such as applications for driver’s license and passports, SSS and GSIS claims, use of Philhealth privileges, and applying for a clearance from the National Bureau of Investigation and the Philippine National Police.

The bill has yet to be decided on by the Senate.

Currently, the general requirement for public and commercial transactions is for an individual to present at least two government-issued ID cards to validate his identity.  It would be easy for a Pinoy to simply present an SSS, GSIS, Philhealth, Driver’s License, Voter’s ID, Senior Citizen ID, or a Professional Regulation Commission ID if his livelihood, profession, or age has qualified him to own any of these.  Otherwise, a Postal ID or a Passport would also be required.  Seldom though that a person has at least two of any of the above IDs.

The need to have a national identification paved the way for the Unified Multi-Purpose ID Card (UMID) issued to SSS, GSIS, Philhealth, and Pag-IBIG members.  The UMID, however, discriminates against citizens who have not sought membership from any of the mentioned agencies, decreasing its merit as a national ID.  It leaves out the self-employed, unemployed, minors, and Pinoy workers abroad.

The national ID covers all citizens of the Philippines, regardless of their geographical location, employment status, skills, and age.  An individual’s national ID may be replaced only when:

  • A child reaches the legal age of 18 years old;
  • A woman who got married and wishes to adopt her husband’s last name as her own;
  • A woman who has been granted annulment from her marriage and wishes to revert to her maiden last name;
  • In case of loss or destruction.

It shall be made of tamper-proof and printed on security material and will be valid for life.

Some groups contested the national ID system as it is vulnerable to security issues such as violation of privacy and identity theft.  In order to address these concerns that threatened to nip the proposal in the bud, the bill included sanctions for imminent abuse of the system.

The entire nation is waiting for the Senate’s final decision on the proposal.  Meanwhile, let us hold on to our government-issued ID card/s, making sure that these are updated and valid all the time.

Do you agree that we, as a nation, must have a National ID System?  Tell us what you think!

Source: http://business.inquirer.net/192804/national-id-system

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