Tag Archive: PSA Birth Certificate


9 Sept 20

The answers are both yes and no.

The DFA recently announced that the PSA birth certificate is no longer a requirement when getting your passport renewed.  While this is true for passport renewal transactions, it does not apply to other cases of passport transactions with the DFA.

The PSA birth certificate remains to be a major requirement for all other passport transactions; below is the list of other transactions with the DFA this is still a requirement:

  1. First-time passport applications.
  2. When having a damaged or mutilated passport replaced.
  3. Applicants that are included in the DFA watchlist.
  4. Renewal of the brown and green old Philippine passports that has no complete middle name of the owner.
  5. Changes in personal information such as for married women or if changing from married name to maiden name.

Be properly guided, friends!

 

References:

www.dfa.gov.ph

www.passport.gov.ph

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9 Sept 18

Another common question we receive in our email, one that we asked ourselves many months back.  And the answer is, no.

Based on my observation, one of the main reasons why it has become so difficult to get an available passport appointment slot is because people do not take their reservations seriously.  They will reserve a slot and then will not show up for their appointment.  This practice actually results in a 2-month wait period for other passport applicants.

In June 2016, the DFA implemented the 30-day ban for passport applicants who do not show up on their appointment date. They are tagged by the system and are not able to reserve an appointment slot for 30 days after their original appointment date.

Just last year, the DFA also tweaked the passport application process so that applicants now have to pay the passport fee before they appear at the DFA for their interview.  The payment confirms their appointment and the DFA shall hold the date and time for the applicant, unless he or she requests to have it re-scheduled.

Re-scheduling can be accommodated only once and will depend on the availability of the appointment slot that the applicant wishes to take.  Also, a weekday appointment can only be re-scheduled to another weekday; you cannot take a weekend date if your original reservation was a weekday.

If you still fail to show up on the re-scheduled date, your passport fee will be forfeited and you will have to go through the reservation process again if you still wish to continue.

I personally think this is the best way that the DFA can be fair to everyone in terms of granting appointment slots to passport applicants.

Visit us again tomorrow for more helpful information about passport applications and renewals.

 

Reference:

www.dfa.gov.ph

www.passport.gov.ph

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9 Sept 17

We covered this topic last year but thought it would be good to write about it again since we receive a lot of questions about changing one’s name in his or her passport.

Married Filipinas are not mandated by law to use their husband’s last name – whether in their IDs, transactions and yes, even in their passports.  Women have the option to retain their maiden last name even after they are married.

If you are married and wish to use your husband’s last name in your passport, you need to present a copy of your PSA marriage certificate to the DFA when you renew your existing passport.

On the other hand, if you have been using your husband’s last name in your passport and have decided to switch back to your maiden name, you can only do so under two circumstances:

  1. If your marriage has been annulled or
  2. If you have been widowed.

In both cases, you need to present supporting documents to the DFA before you are issued a passport with your maiden last name in it.  If your marriage was annulled, you must present an annotated copy of your PSA marriage certificate, one that bears the court order or finality of the annulment.  If you are a widow, you need to present the PSA death certificate of your spouse.

So ladies, remember that once you decide to use your married name in your passport, you cannot simply go back to using your maiden last name anytime. So think about it before you change your last name in your IDs.

Reference:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.passport.gov.ph

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9 Sept 13

As soon as your baby has a PSA birth certificate, you can already apply for his very own passport.  Today, we are going to help you with all the important information needed when getting a passport for babies and minors.

Read on.

A minor is defined as someone who is below 18 years old and those that are over 18 years old but are unable to fully take care of themselves because of physical or mental disability or condition.

The DFA identifies minors into two categories:

  • 0 to 7 years old are:
    • Babies
    • Kids aged seven years old and below
    • No need to secure an appointment online and are entitled to the courtesy lane with their parents and minor siblings.
  • 8 to 17 years old are:
    • Must secure an online appointment for passport applications and renewals.
    • They can access the courtesy lane if they have another sibling aged 7 years old and below who are also applying for or renewing his passport.

A minor child’s passport is only valid for 5 years, unlike that of the regular passport’s 10-year validity.

Steps in getting a Philippine Passport for babies and minors:

  1. Complete the requirements before going to your preferred DFA branch.
  • Confirmed online appointment (if applicable – 8 years old to 17 years old)
  • Duly accomplished passport application form.  You can download a copy of the form here.
  • Personal appearance of the minor child and either parent or authorized legal companion.
  • PSA birth certificate. (How to get PSA birth certificate.)
  • In case the child does not have a PSA birth certificate or a Report of Birth yet, you can submit the following:
    • PSA-authenticated Certified True Copy of LCR Birth Certificate
    • Original copy of Report of Birth or first endorsement from the Consular Records Division IF YOUR CHILD WAS BORN ABROAD ONLY.
  • PSA Marriage Certificate if only one parent will appear before the DFA.  If the parents are not married, an Affidavit of Support and/or Consent must be executed by the mother if she will not be present during the passport application.
  • Passport or any valid government-issued ID of the parent or authorized guardian that will accompany the child.
  • If the child is already attending school, present his valid school ID.
  1. Submit all the requirements to the DFA. Your child’s photo will be taken by a DFA representative during the application process.
  2. Pay the passport fee and make sure you are issued your receipt and a slip of paper with the date when you are to return to the DFA to claim the passport. Keep your receipt as this will serve as your claim stub.
  Regular Express
Aseana and Consular Offices (within Metro Manila) Php 950 (12 working days) Php 1200 (6 working days)
Consular Offices (outside Metro Manila) Php 950 (12 working days) Php 1200 (7 working days)
  1. Claim the child’s passport.

The DFA will keep the passport for 6 months; after which, they shall discard the passport and you will have to go through the process again if you wish to get another one.

 

References:

www.passport.gov.ph

www.filipiknow.net

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9 Sept 12a

Is this your first time to apply for a Philippine passport?  Not sure what documents and IDs to bring?  No idea how to set an online appointment?

We’re here to help!

Read on for the complete guide to applying for your very first passport at the DFA.

Requirements:

  1. You must have a confirmed online appointment with the DFA.
  • Logon to passport.gov.ph and click on the Schedule An Appointment link. Follow the instructions and step-by-step guide.
  • Pay your passport processing fee at any accredited DFA ePayment portal (the list will also be shown on the website and will be sent to your email.).
  • If you are a senior citizen, PWD, pregnant, a minor child, or a Solo Parent ID holder, you are exempted from making an online appointment and can proceed directly to the DFA office of your choice for a walk-in application.
  1. Printout of your passport appointment packet.
  • The link to the documents will be sent to you by the DFA to your email (the email address you provided during the online appointment).
  • Print the documents and bring these with you on the day of your appointment.
  1. Personal appearance at the DFA office of your choice.
  • You cannot send a representative to finish the application for you. If you fail to appear at the DFA on the date and time of your appointment, your application will be voided and you will not be able to apply for an online appointment for 30 days.
  1. Bring a valid ID (original and photocopy).
  • To be sure, bring more than one valid ID and reproduce each. Below is a list of acceptable IDs for passport application:
    • SSS ID
    • GSIS ID
    • UMID Card
    • PhlPost ID (postal ID)
    • COMELEC ID or Voter’s ID
    • Driver’s License
    • Senior Citizen ID
    • School ID (for students)
    • PRC ID
    • OWWA ID
    • PNP Firearms License
    • Airman License (issued August 2016 onwards)
  • The DFA DOES NOT accept PhilHealth ID and TIN ID.
  • NBI Clearance only serves as a supporting document.
  1. Bring an original copy of your PSA Birth Certificate.
  • It must be an original copy authenticated by the PSA and printed on SECPA.
  • You can order yours at psahelpline.ph
  • Alternatively, you can also present a Certified True Copy (CTC) of your birth certificate from the LCR of your birthplace.
  1. Married women must bring a copy of her PSA Marriage Certificate.
  • If you were married abroad, bring a copy of your Report of Marriage, authenticated by the PSA.
  • For women married to a foreign national, bring the original and photocopy of the Commission of Filipino Overseas (CFO) Guidance and Counseling Certificate of Attendance.

I hope this article helped you in preparing for your passport application.  Tomorrow, we are going to feature the passport requirements for minor children who are applying for a passport for the first time.

Visit us again!

Need quick facts about passport applications, requirements, and fees? Read this blog: QUICK FACTS FOR PASSPORT APPLICANTS AT THE DFA.

Source: www.dfa.gov.ph

www.passport.gov.ph

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9 Sept 12

Now here is a valid question that newly-annulled parents often ask us.  So we endeavored to gather the facts to try and answer this rather sad question (one of the saddest, if not the saddest). Our research led us to www.smartparenting.com.ph where the same question was raised and the answer was provided by one Atty. Nikki Jimeno.  We just wish to acknowledge and give them credit for the insightful article they published on their website.

Read on:

If the annulled couple’s marriage was proven to be void from the beginning, then their children are generally considered illegitimate.  What this actually means is that in the annulment process, it was proven that the marriage that the ex-couple had was essentially fake – and it is as if they were never married at all.  Therefore, their children are essentially born out of wedlock – illegitimate.

According to the Family Code of the Philippines, the following marriages are considered void from the beginning:

  • Contracted by any party below 18 even with the consent of parents or guardians;
  • solemnized by any person not legally authorized to perform a marriage unless either or both parties believed in good faith that the solemnizing officer had the legal authority to do so;
  • solemnized without a marriage license except those expressly exempted by law to secure a marriage license;
  • bigamous or polygamous marriages;
  • contracted through mistake of one of the contracting parties as to the identity of the other;
  • incestuous marriages as defined in Article 37 of the FC; and
  • void marriages by reason of public policy (i.e. between step-parents and step-children, between adopting parent and adopted child).

If, however, the marriage was valid but was later declared void due to the psychological incapacity of one or both of the spouses under Article 36 of the Family Code, the children are still considered legitimate.  This is because their parents’ marriage was legitimate, duly registered and acknowledged by the state and did not violate any provision in the Family Code.

Does my child need to drop his father’s last name after my annulment?

If you want your son to continue using his father’s last name, that is alright and permitted by law.  Illegitimate children are permitted to use their father’s last name as long as the biological father acknowledged his paternity over the child.  Only his birthright was affected by the annulment.

 

I want my child to be a legitimate child.

An unwed mother can adopt her own child and make his status legitimate, according to RA 8552 of the Domestic Adoption Act of 1998.  You need to seek the father’s consent and he must be willing to lose his parental authority over the child.  Essentially, your child will have to drop his biological father’s last name and use your maiden last name instead.

 

Source: www.smartparenting.com.ph

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9 Sept 11

I honestly do not know why this happens but it does.  It has happened to some people I know and to a lot of our dear blog and FB followers – they request for a copy of their child’s PSA birth certificate and are surprised to find out that the child’s name or last name are missing!

What do you do when this happens? Read on.

The answer to this type of error in your child’s birth certificate is what is commonly called: a Supplemental Report.

Evidently, the error is not typographical (unlike our topic yesterday) and so the petition for correction of clerical error does not apply to this particular problem.  Here’s how you can file for a Supplemental Report (take note that this approach applies to LEGITIMATE CHILDREN’s birth certificate only):

  1. Submit a copy of the child’s PSA birth certificate with the missing name details to the Local Civil Registry office where the child’s birth was registered.
  2. Include copies of the child’s other identification documents such as school IDs, baptismal certificate, photos, etc.
  3. The LCR will forward a petition to the PSA for review and approval. Meanwhile, the parents shall publish a notice of the case in newspapers and run this for two weeks.
  4. The parents may also be required to file an affidavit explaining the reason for the missing entries.
  5. Once the petition is approved by the PSA, the child’s birth certificate shall be duly annotated with the correct first, middle, or last name and the parents can request for the first corrected copy of the birth certificate at the PSA main office.
  6. This type of correction takes about three to four months to complete.

Again, after you have requested for the first corrected copy from the PSA, you may simply order the succeeding copies of your child’s PSA birth certificates online at www.psahelpline.ph.  This is the more convenient alternative to traveling all the way to PSA offices and waiting in line to get your documents.  PSAHelpline.ph processes your orders and delivers your PSA documents right at your doorstep.

Tomorrow’s topic should be more exciting (and a bit different from birth certificate corrections): does your child become illegitimate after an annulment?

We have a summary of solutions to the most common PSA birth certificate problems!  Read our blog, Common PSA Birth Certificate Problems (and their solutions!).

Visit us again tomorrow!

 

Reference: www.psa.gov.ph

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9 Sept 10

I may have already written about this topic before but I noticed that there are more and more people who send emails and messages asking me how to have a misspelled name (on a PSA birth certificate) can be corrected.  And fast. Haha!  All of us want quick fixes for everything.

Although I could not make the process of correcting your child’s misspelled name faster, I know I could still help by posting yet another “how-to” blog on the topic.  This time, I made sure the details are shorter and easier to follow.

So mommies, I truly hope this topic that I resurrected from my archives helps.  Read and share!

A misspelled first name in a PSA birth certificate can be corrected by filing a petition for correction of a clerical error.  This applies to corrections that are clearly and evidently the result of carelessness in typing.

The last statement is important because there are some misspelled names that do not look like typographical errors. Example:

The child’s name is supposed to be Rachelle but what’s written on her PSA birth certificate is Rochelle.  The name may be misspelled, as far as Rachelle is concerned, but Rochelle is also a valid girl’s name.  In cases like this, the LCR may recommend solutions other than the correction of a clerical error.  I just wanted to make that clear before we proceed with the rest of today’s article.

So assuming yours is really a clerical or typographical error, here’s what you need to do:

  1. Proceed to the LCR or municipal hall of your birthplace and bring with you a copy of the erroneous PSA birth certificate. To support your claim, bring relevant documents bearing the correct spelling of the first name such as a baptismal certificate, school records, IDs.
  2. Fill out the forms from the LCR and pay the corresponding administrative fee. This may vary, depending on the municipality (others have approximated it at Php 1,500); what is important is you pay only to the municipal or city hall treasurer or cashier and you should be issued a government official receipt.

3. Your petition will be submitted by the LCR and you will be advised to wait for around three to four months.

  1. If your petition is approved, you will not be issued a new birth certificate. Your existing PSA birth certificate will be duly annotated to show the correct spelling of the first name.

And that’s it!  You just really have to be patient and vigilant in making follow-ups to make sure that your petition is being attended to.

When you claim the first corrected copy of your PSA birth certificate, you have to request for it in person at the PSA office in East Avenue.  After that, you may just simply order for a copy at PSAHelpline.ph whenever you need a new copy of your annotated PSA birth certificate.

Tomorrow I will write about birth certificates that have missing entries in the First Name, Last Name, and Middle Name fields for legitimate children.  So visit us again tomorrow!

We have a summary of solutions to the most common PSA birth certificate problems!  Read our blog, Common PSA Birth Certificate Problems (and their solutions!).

Source: www.psa.gov.ph

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9 Sept 6

Did you know that the government, through the Philippine Identification System or PhilSys, will capture all transactions you will make using your national ID?

Here are more facts about the national ID that we found in Rappler and are excited to share with you.

  1. The PhilSys centralizes all personal information of Filipino citizens and resident aliens; these are defined individually through the national ID or Philippine ID and the assignment of a PhilSys Number or PSN. The PSN shall authenticate the ID holder’s identity in all transactions with the government or private establishments. These include your application for driver’s license, passport, tax-related transactions, voter’s registration, school applications and enrollment, and bank transactions.
  2. With your national ID, you no longer need to show other IDs just to prove your identity. Providing your PSN will be considered sufficient proof of identity.
  3. You can register in person at any of the following offices, just bring a copy of your PSA birth certificate and one other government-issued ID with your photo full name, and signature or thumb mark. If you are not a citizen of the Philippines, bring proof of residence.
  • PSA Regional and Provincial offices
  • Local Civil Registry Offices
  • Government Service Insurance System (GSIS)
  • Social Security System (SSS)
  • Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth)
  • Home Development Mutual Fund (HDMF or Pag-IBIG)
  • Commission on Elections (COMELEC)
  • Philippine Postal Corporation (PHLPost)
  • Other government-owned and controlled corporations (GOCC) assigned by the Philippine Statistics Agency.
  1. Pinoys living abroad may also register for the PhilSys ID at the Philippine embassy in their area or any registration center designated by the Department of Foreign Affairs.
  2. The pilot test registration shall run from September 2019 until June 2021 and will involve biometric and demographic capturing processes. Once the system is stable, operations will expand to cover select groups from nearby regions like Central Luzon and CALABARZON.
  3. Registration will be open to the public by July 2020 while overseas-based Pinoys may start registering by 2021.
  4. The primary requirement for national ID registration is the PSA birth certificate. Along with this, you also need to bring one government-issued ID that bears your photo, complete name, and signature (or thumb mark).

If you still don’t have a copy of your PSA birth certificate, have it delivered to you by PSAHelpline.ph.  This is where I get all our PSA documents because it’s economical and convenient.  Visit their website now.

Reference:

www.rappler.com

www.psahelpline.ph

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9 Sept 3b

The pilot test for the national ID began last September 1, 2019.  Although the PSA is focused on registering DSWD beneficiaries and selected government agency employees, they are geared to go full blast by mid-2020.  This got me thinking: Pila nanaman sa PSA offices nito sa pag kuha ng birth certificate!

The PSA birth certificate remains to be the primary documentary requirement for the national ID registration (don’t tell me I didn’t tell you, haha!).  And based on the PSA’s assessment, they are expecting a rough total of 107 million Filipinos who will be applying for the national ID once they open it to the general public next year.  Imagine more than 1 million individuals requesting for copies of their birth certificate?  I cannot!

So to get a head start, I decided to request for copies of mine and my family’s as early as now.  I am doing this because based on my experience, the worst months to request for PSA certificates is between January to June.  The K to 12 program is partly to blame for this because school enrollment got spread out to different months, affecting high school and college applications all over the country.  Parents line up at PSA offices, requesting for their children’s birth certificates from as early as January until classes formally open on August and September.  If the national ID is expected to roll out by the middle of next year, that should triple the lines at PSA offices, of people requesting for copies of their birth certificates.

I’m not doing that.  And neither should you!  I know how you can get a copy of your PSA birth certificate without lining up (or taking a leave from work, or commuting under the heat of the sun, or getting caught in traffic!).

Here’s how:

  1. Order online at www.psahelpline.ph

Log on to this site and place your order for birth, marriage, CENOMAR, or death certificate.  The site is user-friendly and will take no more than 10 minutes to finish the entire ordering process.

Make sure you provide a working and accessible email address as well as a mobile number.  You will be given a reference number that you can use to track your order.  In a few days, a courier will deliver your PSA documents right at your doorstep!

What I love about PSAHelpline are the various payment options that they offer —  I think this adds to the convenience and security that I normally look for when shopping online.  I often pay with my credit card, right on the website, but they also have remittance center partners and accredited banks where you can pay over-the-counter.

I live in Manila and in the eight times that I ordered from them, I would always get my documents no more than three days after I made my payment.

They also have a customer service hotline that you can call in case you have questions or would like to make a follow up on your order.

Website: www.psahelpline.ph

Hotline: 02-737-1111

  1. Facebook Messenger of PSAHelpline

Make sure to like and follow them on Facebook because you can also order through Facebook messenger!

Ordering through this channel is just like chatting with a friend, all you have to do is provide the details just as you would when ordering through the website.  I tried this once when I was on a trip and did not have a laptop with me.  Super convenient and fun!

  1. Call the PSAHelpline hotline

If you are in Metro Manila, just dial 737-1111 and a contact center agent will answer your call. He or she will take your order for you and provide your reference number.  If you are calling from outside Metro Manila just add 02 (737-1111) to be connected.

They are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including holidays.

  1. Or you can visit the nearest PSA office

You have to be early though so you can beat the long lines.  I tried this once and realized that it could probably work for people who have a lot of free time on their hands.  It was still a good experience to visit a PSA office; I got some flyers that had FAQs about birth certificate corrections and other important announcements.  I kept those flyers knowing it will come in handy in the future.

My advice?  Choose the option that is most efficient and convenient for you.  But whichever option you choose, I suggest you do it now and not wait until next year.  You never know when the government might change its mind and decide to move the mass registration for national IDs at an earlier date.  It is best that you already have your PSA birth certificate with you now than wait until next year when everyone else decides to get their copies.

Daig ng maagap ang masipag!

See you at the registration centers, friends!

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