Tag Archive: Problems on NSO Marriage Certificate


Father Changed Name on Marriage Certificate

Mildred is the eldest daughter of Mang Gerry and Aling Myrna.  She migrated to the U.S. and earned her citizenship when she married her fiancé who is a natural-born citizen of America.  Two years after she was sworn in, she petitioned for her parents to legally stay in the U.S. with her and her husband.

Part of the requirements she needs to submit were her parents’ birth and marriage certificates.  When she received the copies of the documents, she was surprised to find out that her father’s names on his birth and marriage certificates were different.

On his marriage certificate, his name is written as Gerardo Perez Gonzales.  On his birth certificate, his name is Geronimo Perez Gonzalez.  Mildred knew this will cause delays on her petition if not addressed right away.

She talked to her father about the discrepancies.  Why did he use a different name all his life?  Why did he not tell his wife who he really was?

Mang Gerry admitted that he was not even aware that his real name is Geronimo; his parents and siblings have always referred to him as Gerardo.  All his school records show his name as Gerardo and his last name as Gonzales, not Gonzalez.  In all of his employment records, he used the name Gerardo Gonzales.  He does not have any other record as Geronimo Gonzalez except for his PSA birth certificate.

The family decided to have the entries on Mang Gerry’s birth certificate corrected in order to agree with all his identification cards and personal documents, including the birth certificates of his children where his name is also written as Gerardo Gonzales.

On the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website, www.psa.gov.ph Mang Gerry’s problems on his first and last names are covered by two scenarios:

  1. First name used is different from the first name entered in the birth certificate.
  2. Last name is misspelled.

For both cases, Mang Gerry may file for petitions under R.A. 9048.

To change his first name from Geronimo (written on his birth certificate) to Gerardo (the name he is using), he needs to file a Petition for Change of First Name.  To support his petition, he needs to submit the following documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment records, GSIS/SSS records, medical records, business records, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook.
  3. Notice / Certificate of Posting;
  4. Payment of P3,000 as filing fee.
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar such as:
    • NBI/Police Clearance
    • Civil registry records of ascendants and other clearances as may be required by the concerned civil registry office
    • Proof of Publication

To correct his last name, from Gonzalez to Gonzales, Mang Gerry may file a petition for correction of clerical error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.  For this petition, he needs to submit the following supporting documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/Police Clearance, civil registry records of ascendants.
  3. Notice / Certificate of Posting
  4. Payment of P1,000 as filing fee.
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

Source:

https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/wrong-spelling-0

https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/first-name-used-different-first-name-entered-birth

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No Middle Name

When an illegitimate child is born, it is likely that he will be given his mother’s last name as his last name.  In which case, the middle name field on his certificate of live birth will be left blank.

There are two possible scenarios to be observed when correcting or supplying a middle name on an illegitimate child’s birth certificate:

a. If the child is acknowledged by the father.

To supply the omitted middle name on the child PSA birth certificate, a supplemental report should be filed.  The supplemental report may be filed by the owner of the birth certificate (if of age), his spouse, children, his parents, siblings, grandparents, guardians, or any other person duly authorized by law or by the owner of the birth certificate.

If the owner was born in the Philippines, he needs to file the supplemental report at the LCR office where his birth was registered.  If born abroad, he needs to file this at the Philippine Consulate of the country where he was born.  In case he is already permanently residing in the Philippines, he needs to provide supporting documents which shall then be forwarded to the Department of Foreign Affairs.

b. If the child is not acknowledged by the father.

If the child’s biological father fails to acknowledge the child, the middle name shall not be supplied anymore and the child shall carry his mother’s maiden last name as his last name.

On the other hand, legitimate children should always have a middle name indicated on their birth certificates.  In case this entry is missing, a supplemental report, containing the reason why the child’s middle name was omitted, must be filed at the LCR where the child’s birth was registered.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/no-middle-name

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No Signature of Couple

A marriage certificate cannot be considered valid if any of the parties involved fail to sign the document.  In all of the civil wedding rites I have witnessed, the solemnizing officer requests the marrying couple and their sponsors to go over the marriage certificate carefully and take all the time they need to make sure that all entries in the document are clearly written and all fields and copies requiring their signatures are properly signed.

All these are vital in order to seal the veracity of the marriage certificate.

What must you do in case your copy of the PSA marriage certificate lacks the necessary signatures required to make the document authentic?

Mona and Luis got married rather too early and under pressing circumstances.  It was the usual story of a young love gone awry because of unplanned pregnancy and the stress of admitting their situation to their parents.  Sadly though, after their civil wedding, Mona had a miscarriage and lost the baby in her womb.

Their relationship went downhill from there until Mona had no other choice but to move back in with her parents.  She and Luis had not had communication for three years straight; they would only hear about each other from common friends.  When Mona began working in a contact center, she met JC and fell in love.  Three years later, JC proposed to marry her and she eagerly said “Yes!”

At the onset of her relationship with JC, Mona disclosed everything about her past, especially her marriage to Luis.  JC offered to help finance her annulment so she would be legally free to marry again.  They sought the services of a lawyer who gave them the list of documents they need to submit in order to officially begin the annulment process.

Mona ordered copies of her birth and marriage certificates as these were primary on her list.  When she received the documents, she was oddly surprised to find that Luis did not sign the marriage certificate.  She reviewed the document over and over and could not find any other entry there that could pass for Luis’ signature.  On the “contracting party” fields, her and Luis’ names were typewritten and only her name had a signature above it.

This made her think.  If their marriage certificate lacked her husband’s signature, does it make the document invalid and therefore, their marriage, null and void?

When they showed the marriage certificate to their lawyer, they were advised to first seek the counsel of the Local Civil Registry office where their marriage was registered.  If the LCR can confirm that their copy of Mona and Luis’ marriage certificate is essentially “invalid” because the groom failed to sign the document, then they can look forward to a smooth and fast conclusion of the annulment.  For the first time in her life, Mona hoped that Luis’ attempt to fool her was successful.

Upon inquiring at the LCR however, Mona was informed that the copy they have on file has the complete set of signatures, both hers and Luis’, including those of the witnesses and the solemnizing officer’s.  They showed her the copy and offered to endorse a certified photocopy to PSA for proper certification.

Turns out that Mona and Luis were legally married and in order for her to marry again, she would have to work on the annulment process and hope that she be granted the legal right to re-marry soon.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/no-signatures-contracting-parties-replacement-nso-copy

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No Date of Marriage

It pays to carefully review our civil registry documents to make sure that all entries are accurate and clearly printed on the form.  Should there be entries needing correction, it is best to act on it as soon as possible as these corrections take time.  It would be a shame to miss out on opportunities simply because your birth or marriage certificate is not 100% accurate as required by most government and private establishments that we regularly transact with.

Our story for today is about a lady whose ardent dream is to travel to the U.S. and experience winter in the East Coast.  Melissa finally got her wish when her husband, Greg, announced that he has secured them an appointment at the DFA so they can renew their passports and then fly out to the U.S. in time for Christmas.  She was beyond ecstatic!

Melissa and Greg have only been married for less than two years and Melissa still uses her maiden name on her passport.  Since they are renewing their passports, she decided to include changing her maiden name to her married name.  They prepared all the necessary documents, their old passports, and other requirements needed for the passport renewal.

While waiting for their turn at the DFA, Greg noticed that the PSA marriage certificate he was holding did not have an entry in the date field.  There was no date indicated as to when he and Melissa got married.  He asked Melissa to check the copy in her file, the date of marriage field is also blank on the document she was holding.

Their worst fears were confirmed when they were told that renewing Melissa’s passport to reflect her married name may not be possible at this time because the marriage certificate they are presenting lacked the said detail.  She can still have her passport renewed but her maiden name shall be retained.

Melissa’s case, although alarming, can be remedied by filing a supplemental report at the city or municipality where her marriage with Greg was registered.  The following documents must be presented upon filing the petition:

  • Affidavit of Supplemental Report on missing entries
  • Copy of the Marriage Certificate from the PSA

Fees and other details related to these types of cases may be inquired at the Local Civil Registry office where the parties will be filing the supplemental reports.  While the first corrected copy of the PSA marriage certificate may be claimed by Melissa and Greg at the nearest PSA office.

Once they have the corrected copy of their marriage certificate, Melissa can have her name on her passport changed to her married name.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/no-entries-some-items-certificate-marriage

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Blurred

All the details reflected on your NSO Marriage Certificate (now PSA Marriage Certificate) are vital in proving the validity of your and your spouse’s union.  Should there be items that were omitted or overlooked while filling out the document, make sure to attend to these right away to avoid any delays in your future transactions like updating your IDs, passports, and bank accounts.

Conrad and Annie are a young couple who recently moved out of their parent’s house in Ilocos to begin life on their own in Manila.  Conrad is a banker while Annie used to be a pre-school teacher.  She voluntarily gave up her profession so she can focus on their baby and tend to their home.

Being the sole breadwinner for his family, Conrad invested on a health insurance for Annie and their baby so they would not need to worry about their finances when someone gets sick and needs to be taken to the hospital.  When he submitted their documents to the insurance firm, he was advised to double check their marriage certificate as the date and place of their marriage seem to be missing.

Going over the document, he realized that the fields for the date and place of marriage were not necessarily blank; it looked more like whatever were written on the blanks were smudged beyond recognition.  Conrad called Annie and asked her to check the other copies she had on file; unfortunately though, all copies had the same smudgy marks on the said fields.

The insurance firm would not proceed with his transaction until he is able to present a clearer copy of his marriage certificate.  Without the document, it would be difficult to prove that he and Annie are married and that she is qualified to be his primary dependent and beneficiary.

The couple packed their bags and took a long drive to Laoag City, where they were married.  They proceeded to the Local Civil Registry office where their marriage was registered and requested for a clearer copy of their certificate of marriage.  Sadly though, even the copies kept by the LCR were blurry and unreadable.

Based on the Philippine Statistics Authority’s (www.psa.gov.ph) website, if the LCR’s copy of the marriage certificate is also unreadable, the document must be “reconstructed” following the couple’s submission of a duly accomplished LCR Form No. 3A.  The LCR will facilitate the reconstruction of their document so they can get a clearer copy later on.  The fees shall be determined by the municipal office and the requesting parties will be advised as to how long the process will take before they can get a clear copy of their document.

Source: http://www.census.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/blurredunreadable-entries

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Misspelled Name of Bride or Groom

A marriage certificate is a vital civil registry document that attests to the union of a man and a woman. That is why it is important that the information written on the certificate are all accurate.

So what happens when you miss an entry or misspell a name in a marriage certificate?  Can these be corrected like how you correct an erroneous entry in a birth certificate?

Larps (short for Pilar) is a military nurse at a government hospital.  She plans to migrate to the U.S. as soon as she is granted a working visa.  When she met Steve, a U.S. Navy officer, they fell in love and decided to get married through civil rites in Quezon City.  After honeymooning in Boracay, Steve left for the U.S. and promised Larps that he will work on her petition papers as soon as he lands.

She began working on her documents, foremost of which is getting her passport renewed.  Steve reminded her to make sure she uses her married name on her passport from Maria Pilar T. Sorosa  to her married name of Maria Pilar S. Winters.

Larps requested for a copy of her PSA birth certificate and PSA marriage certificate as these were part of the documentary requirements for her passport renewal.  When she received the documents, she realized that the name appearing on her marriage certificate is slightly different from the name written on her birth certificate.

On her birth certificate, her name is written as Maria Pilar while on her marriage certificate, it is written as Ma. Pilar.  Right away, she knew this was going to be a concern especially since she will be presenting these documents at the U.S. Embassy.

How does a person have the information on her PSA marriage certificate corrected for errors?

These types of errors are covered by R.A. 9048 or the Clerical Error Law.  This law authorizes the LCR offices to apply corrections on birth and marriage certificate errors that are obviously due to typographical oversights.

Larps need only to file a petition for the correction of her name’s spelling on her marriage certificate, through R.A. 9048.  She needs to have it “corrected” so that her full name, Maria Pilar, as it is written on her birth certificate, appears on her marriage certificate.  Since they got married in Quezon City, she has to file the petition at the city hall of Quezon City.

Based on the Philippine Statistics Authority’s (PSA) website, the filing fee for such corrections is P1,000, while the wait time to get the corrected copy shall be determined by the LCR.

It is better to address these corrections at the onset than wait until you are almost done with the filing process before you act on it.  Simple clerical errors can now be handled by the LCR and the sooner you file for correction, the sooner you can get on with your transactions.

Source: http://www.census.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/wrong-spelling-name-bride-andor-groom

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