Tag Archive: PNP


07 - 24 -1 (1)

It has been more than a year since we featured House Bill No. 5060 or the Philippine Identification System Act.  This is the bill that will require all Filipinos to be issued a national identification card that will serve as their main identification for all government transactions, claims, use of government-mandated benefits, and applying for clearances from the NBI and PNP.   At that time, the said bill has just been signed and approved by the House of Representatives and was passed on to the Senate for deliberation.

While the country is eagerly awaiting the finality the National ID System Act, the Department of Finance (DOF) came up with an additional proposal to tap the ID as a means to determine an individual’s privilege to certain subsidies, discounts, and tax exemptions under the law.

How do these additional parameters affect the National ID System’s initial purpose?

Apart from the National ID being an all-in-one valid ID (except as a Driver’s License and Passport), the DOF is proposing that it contain biometrics data to determine a citizen’s entitlement to certain subsidies and benefits provided by the government.

For example, if a PWD is entitled to discounts on medicines, fare, and education, his (national) ID alone should be enough to determine his eligibility for such discounts.  Another possibility that the DOF is looking at is to activate an EMV (Europay-Mastercard-Visa) chip in the card.  Through this chip, the card can double as an ATM card where the owner may receive cash subsidies from the government, if he or she is legally entitled to such benefits.  It simplifies the identification and benefits disbursement process, both for the government and the recipient.

Do these new proposals affect the anticipated release and distribution of the IDs?

It does.

The issuance of the IDs will be done in batches.  Since the DOF has expressed its intention of tapping the National ID to address the long process of applying and claiming benefits for individuals with special needs, senior citizens and persons with disabilities are seen to be the first recipients of these IDs.  Soon after, members of the 5.2 million poor households that are not yet covered by the conditional cash transfer program of the DSWD will follow.

All in all, the government plans to provide IDs to the more than 100 million Filipinos in two years’ time, after the bill is enacted into law.

Who will issue the IDs?

The Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) shall be responsible for the proper issuance of the ID cards.

We will keep this thread updated on the progress of the proposed National ID System.  If you have any questions or related information you would like to share, please feel free to send us a message.  We will do our best to find the answers for you.

Sources:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.dof.gov.ph

www.philstar.com

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05 - 18

The announcement that the Anti-distracted Driving Act will finally be enforced this week (today actually!) was met with a lot of questions from drivers, especially those that use navigation apps and other gadgets such as dash cameras.  If you read our previous article on this topic or have seen the news articles in the internet, you already have an idea of the exorbitant fees that will be charged anyone caught violating the law.  Quite obviously, the clamor for answers and clarifications was driven by the rather shocking fees you will have to pay if you so much as looked at your beeping phone while sitting behind the wheel.

We ran a research to find out what the Land Transportation Office (LTO) has to say about these questions.  We hope the following details gathered from the internet will help clear things out and set every driver’s mind at ease.

1.On the use of navigation apps installed on smartphones.

Question: Does this mean I could no longer use navigation apps while driving?

Answer: According to the LTO, drivers are still allowed to use these smartphone-based apps provided:

  • The driver sets the app BEFORE driving.
  • Uses a speaker to listen to the directions instead of looking at the smartphone screen.
  • Pulls over if he needs to reset his destination.

2. On the use of a mobile phone mount.

Question: Are mobile phone mounts included in the prohibitions?

Answer: No, for as long as the phone and the mount do not obstruct the driver’s view.

3. On the use of dash cameras.

Question: Should I now get rid of my dashcam?

Answer: Dashcams are allowed.  Just place it behind the rearview mirror so that, again, it does not obstruct the driver’s line of sight.

4. On the use of earphones while driving.

Question: Earphones are hands-free devices, am I allowed to use this while driving?

Answer: Yes but only to make or receive calls.  You should not use it to listen to music while on the road.

5. On heavily tinted cars whose drivers think they can “get away with it”.

Question: How will they know I’m using my mobile, they can’t see me!

Answer: This just in: The Department of Transportation now uses high-definition cameras that can detect light coming from devices inside heavily tinted cars.  Plus, enforcers are well-trained to distinguish if a driver is distracted by merely observing the car’s movement.

The law covers public and private vehicles, including bicycles, motorcycles, motorcycle taxis, “kalesas” or any other animal-driven wagons or carts.  Yes, no one is exempted, not even vehicles owned by the government.  According to the LTO Chief, violators can raise their contentions during the hearing at the LTO.  That simply means that enforcers will not let erring drivers slide and skedaddle without a violation ticket, no questions asked.

There you have it!  If you have other questions, feel free to post it here and we’ll try our best to dig deeper and find the answers for you.

Have a safe trip!

Reference: www.cnnphilippines.com

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05 - 16 (1)

In August of last year, we featured the details of the Anti-Distracted Driving Act and got various reactions from our readers.  Less than a year later, it will finally be enforced in all areas in the Philippines!

On Thursday, May 18, 2017, private and public utility drivers will no longer be allowed to use mobile devices behind the wheel, whether they are on the move or on full stop while waiting for traffic lights to change.

To refresh our memories, below are the salient points of the Anti-Distracted Driving Act and the penalties that await those who will insist on their exceptional multi-tasking abilities.

What is “Distracted Driving”?

In the bill, it is defined as:

  • “using a mobile communications device to write, send, or read text-based communication or to make or receive calls, and other similar acts.”
  • “an electronic entertainment or computing device to play games, watch movies, surf the internet, compose messages, read e-books, perform calculations, and other similar acts.”

Exemptions:

  • You may use the mentioned mobile devices as long as it does not interfere with your line of sight.
  • You may make and receive calls as long as you do so using hands-free functions such as speakerphones and earphones.
  • You may use the device to make an emergency call.
  • Drivers of ambulances, fire trucks, and the like may use their mobile phones for as long as this is done in the scope of their duties and when responding to emergencies.

What are the fines and penalties if a driver violates the law?

  1. First offense – Php 5,000
  2. Second offense – Php 10,000
  3. Third offense – Php 15,000 and a 3-month suspension of your driver’s license
  4. Fourth offense –Php 20,000 and revocation of your driver’s license

MMDA and PNP are empowered to apprehend violators, whether private or public vehicles, including government and diplomatic vehicles, motorcycles, and tricycles.

References:

www.gov.ph

http://www.topgear.com.ph

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09-08

The President placed the entire country under a “State of Lawlessness” following the bombing incident in Davao City last weekend.  Under this Presidential declaration, police and military presence are heightened through checkpoints in strategic locations, particularly in city streets and major thoroughfares.

Here are reminders on how drivers must properly respond when asked to stop at a checkpoint.  These are motorists’ rights as published by the Philippine National Police. These are meant to protect drivers from unscrupulous individuals who might take advantage of the government’s measures to keep our streets safe.

Police Checkpoint Guidelines

  1. Checkpoints must   be well-lighted, properly identified and manned by uniformed personnel.
  2. Upon approach, slow down, dim headlights, and turn on cabin lights.
  3. Never step out of the vehicle.
  4. Lock all doors of vehicles during inspection since only visual search is allowed.
  5. Never submit to physical and body search.
  6. Motorists are not required to open their glove compartment, trunk, or bags.
  7. Be courteous but firm in answering, assert your rights, have presence of mind and do not panic.
  8. Keep your driver’s license and car registration handy.
  9. Be ready to use your mobile phones at any time; speed dial emergency numbers.
  10. Report violations immediately.

Share this with your family especially if you have kids who drive their own vehicles.  Always make sure your mobile phone has enough battery and credits so you can call emergency numbers and ask for police assistance.

Source: http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/580032/news/nation/how-to-respond-properly-at-police-checkpoints.

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09 - 06

Last Monday, September 5, 2016, the PNP, in cooperation with the country’s leading telecommunication companies, launched a mobile app called “Itaga Mo Sa Bato”.  It is meant to let subscribers connect to an emergency hotline platform to report an emergency or request for immediate assistance.  This is still in line with President’s 911 and 8888 service hotlines.

How does the app work?

There are two ways to use ‘Itaga Mo Sa Bato’:

  1. Users can send text reports to the Police; this costs P2.50 per text message sent.  Sending complaints through the mobile app is free of charge.  The app runs on mobile data or wifi internet connection.
  2. The app is set for automatic calling to the 911 emergency hotline and users can call the hotline by clicking a particular button.

When an emergency is reported, the following pertinent information are sent to PNP Command Center’s server to help authorities better respond to the call for assistance:

  1. Type of emergency
  2. Name and Address of establishment
  3. Contact number of reporting party
  4. Contact number of nearest police or fire station

The PNP Chief has a special access to the system that allows him to monitor the reports received through the mobile app and if these have been attended to by the concerned personnel.

According to the Police Community Relations Group, the app will be made available to Android and iOS phones in the coming days.  Watch out for it.

Are you excited to download this new app?  Tell us what you think about this new development from our government.

Source: http://www.rappler.com/technology/news/145288-pnp-smart-globe-bato-app-emergency-response

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ADDA

It is now illegal to use your mobile phone while driving or temporarily stopped at a red light.  Mobile phone use include texting, calling, surfing the net, and all other such activities done on a phone or any electronic gadget that take the driver’s attention away from the road.

The law also clearly states how violators will be penalized for refusing to comply with the ADDA:

  • First offense – P5,000 fine
  • Second offense – P10,000 fine
  • Third offense – P15,000 fine and a 3-month suspension on your driver’s license
  • Fourth offense – P20,000 fine and revocation of your driver’s license.

The MMDA and PNP are empowered to enforce the law, nationwide.

Are there exceptions to the ADDA?

The ADDA aims to prevent road mishaps resulting from distracted driving.  In reference, distracted driving is the use or performance of the following while the vehicle is in motion or stopped at a red light:

  • Using a mobile communications device to write, send, or read text messages;
  • Make or receive calls;
  • Using an electronic device to read e-books, play games, watch movies, etc.

However, if the mobile device is being used through hands-free function such as a speaker phone, the driver is not deemed “distracted” and therefore, is not considered a violation of the law.  This is also applicable for motorists who are dependent on mobile driving and navigation apps, provided that the device does not interfere with the driver’s line of sight.

Another exception is when the driver is using the phone for emergency purposes as in the case of driving an ambulance.

Does this law discriminate between private and public utility vehicles?

Absolutely not.  It applies to all types of transportation, including government and diplomatic vehicles, motorcycles and tricycles.

The rules and guidelines of the ADDA are yet to be finalized and released to the public.

Sources:

http://www.autoindustriya.com/features/legal-eagle-understanding-the-anti-distracted-driving-act.html

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/07/31/1608520/no-more-texting-while-driving-new-law-states

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Bonjour. Mabuhay.

 

Dahil uso ang checkpoint ngayon at mainit ito sa balita.

Here are some checkpoint facts from the PNP:

 

The PNP Chief, Police Director General Nicanor A Bartolome reiterated strict compliance on the proper conduct of checkpoints.

In the joint reform initiatives of the Department of Justice, a “no tint” or “clear window” policy among marked police vehicles and similar official vehicles may boost the confidence of the community on authorities. The policy promotes accountability in governance and may also place an inherent check on scalawags.

The use of dark or heavy tints is helpful, and even necessary, in case of surveillance and other similar law enforcement operations. But in some purpose, tints are used for marked vehicles which are readily identifiable and cannot reasonably be used for legitimate covert work. This also provides impunity to persons violating the simplest of laws such as traffic rules and other kinds of illegal acts.

The general public is advised on the rules on military/police checkpoints as follows;

  • Checkpoint must be well-lighted, properly identified and manned by uniformed personnel.
  • Upon approach, slowdown, dim headlights and turn on cabin lights. Never step out of the vehicle.
  • Lock all doors. Only visual search is allowed.
  • Do not submit to a physical or body search.
  • You are not obliged to open glove compartment, trunk or bags.
  • Ordinary/Routine questions may be asked. Be courteous but firm with answers.
  • Assert your rights, have presence of mind and do not panic.
  • Keep your driver’s license and car registration handy and within reach.
  • Be ready to use your cellphone at anytime. Speed Dial emergency number.
  • Report violations immediately. Your actions may save others.

This public advisory guides motorists on how to deal with authorities in checkpoints and ensure its implementation on proper searches and seizures to avoid violation of human rights. The advisory also serve as a warning to erring law enforcers and eliminate illegal checkpoints.

“As the promotion of right-based policing becomes a focal point in the agenda of the PNP leadership, the conduct of police or law enforcement must be in compliance with human rights standard” stated General Bartolome.

 

http://pnp.gov.ph/portal/press-news-releases/latest-news/640-10-checkpoint-guidelines

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