Tag Archive: NSO problems


Manila City Hall_13

If you were the firstborn in your family but your birth certificate states that you have siblings older than you, then you need to have that entry corrected as soon as possible.  The birth order determines how many children your mother has already had and the succession of each child in the family tree.

Here are the steps to follow when filing a petition to correct your birth order on your birth certificate:

(a). 2 latest certified LCR copies and 2 latest PSA copies of birth certificate to be corrected.

(b). 2 latest certified copies of birth certificate of all brothers and sisters of the document owner.

(c). 2 latest original or certified copies of Obstetrical record, Medical Records, and Pre-natal Records from the hospital and/or OB GYNE.

(d). 2 photocopies of any of the following documents of the parents where all their children are indicated as their beneficiary and arranged according to birth order:

  • SSS
  • GSIS
  • BIR
  • Philhealth
  • Private Insurance

(e). 2 copies of valid IDs of the petitioner and the document owner and 1 copy of latest Community Tax Certificate from the place of work or residence.

(f). SPA (Special Power of Attorney).  If the petitioner is abroad or sick, he/she can be represented by lawyer or his/her nearest relative (up to third degree of consanguinity).

REMINDERS

  1. All civil documents (Birth, Marriage, and Death) to be submitted should be the latest certified local copy of Security Paper from the PSA.
  2. After the compliance of the requirements, please proceed to the information counter and get a number for the pre-interview and bring the original copies of the supporting documents (Personal Records).  Only applicants with complete requirements will be entertained for pre-interview.
  3. Steps to follow will be provided after the Final Interview.
  4. Processing of the petitions is four (4) months and will commence on the date the petition is received by the Manila City Hall.
  5. Payments are as follows:
    • Registration Fee – P1,000
    • Certified Xerox Copy – P230
    • Transmittal Fee – P210
    • Additional Payment – P30

The City Hall does not conduct interviews during Fridays.

Source: http://manila.gov.ph/services/civil-registry/

Ad

 

 

Manila City Hall_10

When the details of your parents’ marriage, as reflected on your birth certificate, do not coincide with the details written on their marriage certificate, your birth right or legitimacy may be placed in question.  The consequences of these types of errors may have an impact on your future transactions involving your parents such as a petition for their migration to join you in another country or when you claim your inheritance and other benefits after they have passed away.

If you have this type of error on your birth certificate, have it corrected right away.  Below are the requirements and processes when filing at the Manila City Hall.

Requirements:

(a). 2 latest certified copies and 2 latest copies of PSA birth certificate (formerly NSO) to be corrected.

(b). 2 latest copies of PSA marriage certificates (formerly NSO) of document owner’s parents.

(c). 2 latest copies of PSA birth certificates (formerly NSO) of document owner’s siblings.

(d). 2 latest copies of CENOMAR of both parents from PSA (formerly NSO).

(e). 2 latest certified copies of parents’ marriage contract from the church stating the date of the civil marriage and / or certificate of no record of parents’ marriage contract in reference to the erroneous date and place of marriage indicated in the birth certificate to be corrected.

(f). 2 copies of baptismal certificate.

(g). 2 copies of school records, from grade school to high school, either F-137/138 or Certification or College TOR.

(h). 2 copies of valid ID of the petitioner and the document owner and 1 copy of latest Community Tax Certificate from the place of work or residence.

(i). SPA (Special Power of Attorney) if the petitioner is out of the country or sick and incapable of appearing personally at the city hall, he/she can be represented by a lawyer or his/her nearest relative (up to third degree of consanguinity).

Procedure:

(a). All civil documents (birth, marriage, and death) must be the latest certified local copies or printed on Security Paper from the PSA (formerly NSO).

(b). Bring the complete set of documents to the Manila City Hall; proceed to the information counter and secure a number for the pre-interview session.  Bring all original copies of the supporting documents for verification purposes.

(c). Steps to be followed will be provided after the Final Interview.

(d). Processing of the Petition is four (4) months and will commence on the date when the petition was received at the City Hall.

(e). Fees:

  • Registration Fee – Php 1,000.00
  • Certified Photocopy – Php 230.00
  • Transmittal Fee — Php 210.00
  • Additional Payment for documents with supplemental reports – Php 30.00

No interviews every Friday.

Source: http://manila.gov.ph/services/civil-registry/

Ad

Manila City Hall_2

Any discrepancy on your first name on your birth certificate is sure to cause problems and delays on your transactions later on.  It is your responsibility to have this corrected to avoid issues with your records and other IDs such as your driver’s license and passport.

The Manila City Hall has released a clear, step-by-step process for citizens who need to have their first names corrected.  Included as well is the list of documentary requirements that applicants need to have on hand for this particular transaction.

Here is the second part in this 16-part series on Civil Registry procedures at the Manila City Hall:

DOCUMENTARY REQUIREMENTS:

(a). 2 latest certified/local copies and 2 latest PSA (formerly NSO) copies of birth certificate to be corrected.

(b). 2 latest certified copy of PSA (formerly NSO) marriage contract of the document owner.

(c). 2 latest certified copies of PSA (formerly NSO) birth certificate of at least 2 children of the document owner.

(d). 2 copies of baptismal certificate.

(e). 2 copies of school records, (Elementary and High School either F-137/138 or Certification) or College (TOR)

(f). 2 certified copies of voter’s registration record/voters affidavit. (COMELEC)

(g). 2 latest original NBI Clearance. (PURPOSE: FOR CORRECTION OF FIRST NAME)

(h). 2 latest original PNP Clearance. (PURPOSE: FOR CORRECTION OF FIRST NAME)

(i). 2 copies of valid ID of the petitioner and the document owner and 1 copy of latest community tax certificate from the place of work or residence.

(j). Other documents which the Office may consider relevant and necessary for the approval of the Petition.

(GSIS/SSS Record, Diploma (Grade School, High School, or College/Vocational), Medical Record, Business Record, Service Record, Insurance, Certificate of Land Title, Passbook etc.

(k). SPA (Special Power of Attorney), If the petitioner is abroad, or sick, he/she can be represented by lawyer or his/her nearest relative (up to third degree of consanguinity).

PROCESS AND REMINDERS:

(a). All civil documents (Birth, Marriage and Death) to be submitted should be the latest certified local copy or Security paper from PSA (formerly NSO).

(b). After the compliance of the requirements, please proceed to the information counter and get a number for the Pre-interview and bring the original copies of the supporting documents (Personal Records).

Please be reminded that only the applicants with complete set of requirements will be entertained for pre-interview.

(c). Steps to follow will be provided after the Final Interview.

(d). Processing period of the petition is four (4) months and will commence on the date the petition is received by the Office.

(e). Payments are as follows:

  • Registration Fee (P 1,000.00)
  • Certified Xerox Copy (P230.00)
  • Transmittal Fee (P 210.00)
  • Additional Payment of 30.00 (Document with supplemental report.)

Please be reminded that the City Hall does not conduct interviews during Fridays.

Source: http://manila.gov.ph/services/civil-registry/

Ad

Father Changed Name on Marriage Certificate

Mildred is the eldest daughter of Mang Gerry and Aling Myrna.  She migrated to the U.S. and earned her citizenship when she married her fiancé who is a natural-born citizen of America.  Two years after she was sworn in, she petitioned for her parents to legally stay in the U.S. with her and her husband.

Part of the requirements she needs to submit were her parents’ birth and marriage certificates.  When she received the copies of the documents, she was surprised to find out that her father’s names on his birth and marriage certificates were different.

On his marriage certificate, his name is written as Gerardo Perez Gonzales.  On his birth certificate, his name is Geronimo Perez Gonzalez.  Mildred knew this will cause delays on her petition if not addressed right away.

She talked to her father about the discrepancies.  Why did he use a different name all his life?  Why did he not tell his wife who he really was?

Mang Gerry admitted that he was not even aware that his real name is Geronimo; his parents and siblings have always referred to him as Gerardo.  All his school records show his name as Gerardo and his last name as Gonzales, not Gonzalez.  In all of his employment records, he used the name Gerardo Gonzales.  He does not have any other record as Geronimo Gonzalez except for his PSA birth certificate.

The family decided to have the entries on Mang Gerry’s birth certificate corrected in order to agree with all his identification cards and personal documents, including the birth certificates of his children where his name is also written as Gerardo Gonzales.

On the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website, www.psa.gov.ph Mang Gerry’s problems on his first and last names are covered by two scenarios:

  1. First name used is different from the first name entered in the birth certificate.
  2. Last name is misspelled.

For both cases, Mang Gerry may file for petitions under R.A. 9048.

To change his first name from Geronimo (written on his birth certificate) to Gerardo (the name he is using), he needs to file a Petition for Change of First Name.  To support his petition, he needs to submit the following documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment records, GSIS/SSS records, medical records, business records, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook.
  3. Notice / Certificate of Posting;
  4. Payment of P3,000 as filing fee.
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar such as:
    • NBI/Police Clearance
    • Civil registry records of ascendants and other clearances as may be required by the concerned civil registry office
    • Proof of Publication

To correct his last name, from Gonzalez to Gonzales, Mang Gerry may file a petition for correction of clerical error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.  For this petition, he needs to submit the following supporting documents:

  1. Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected;
  2. Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS record, medical record, business record, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI/Police Clearance, civil registry records of ascendants.
  3. Notice / Certificate of Posting
  4. Payment of P1,000 as filing fee.
  5. Other documents which may be required by the concerned civil registrar.

Source:

https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/wrong-spelling-0

https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/first-name-used-different-first-name-entered-birth

Ad

Single Mom

Illegitimate children are able to carry their father’s last name by virtue of an Affidavit of Acknowledgment and an Affidavit to Use the Surname of the Father (AUSF).  Should the parents decide to get married later on, the illegitimate children’s birth rights may also be changed from “illegitimate” to “legitimate” through the process of Legitimation Due to Subsequent Marriage (of parents).

In some cases though, the father exits the picture and the mother is left to take care of the children on her own.  This can go from bad to worse when the father ends up marrying a different woman, completely abandoning his responsibilities with his children from his previous relationship.

Such is the case of Patty, a single mother of 2 children, born 2 years apart.  She is a call center agent and is raising her kids with the help of her parents.  Her boyfriend, Alex, left her and their children before her youngest son was even one year old.  He said that he was leaving for the U.S. to work and promised to send financial support for the children’s needs and education.  A few months after he left, Alex told Patty that he needs to marry his high school classmate who is now a U.S. citizen in order for him to legally work in Florida.  “Marriage for convenience lang.”

Patty’s worst fears were confirmed when she received an email from Alex telling her that he and his wife will be migrating to New Zealand soon and he could no longer promise to send his regular support for their children.  A few months after that, Patty found out that Alex and his new wife were expecting their first child.  She was devastated.

Patty’s children carry Alex’s last name in all of their identifications, including their PSA birth certificates.  Now that Patty is left to raise both kids on her own, she would like for the children to drop their father’s last name and carry hers instead.  She would not allow for Alex to have the honor of giving his name to his children when he has now clearly abandoned them for his new family.

Question is, can Patty have Alex’s last name dropped from the children’s birth certificates?

Based on the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website, www.psa.gov.ph, an illegitimate child has the right to carry his father’s last name for as long as the father duly acknowledged him by virtue of the following:

  • The father executed an Affidavit of Acknowledgement
  • The father presents a Private Handwritten Instrument (PHI)
  • The father acknowledged the child at the back of the birth certificate or in a separate public instrument.

With respect to any of the above conditions, the child’s birth certificate bears his father’s last name as his last name.  Although he is still considered “illegitimate” (since his parents were not married at the time of his birth), he is given the right to use his father’s last name.

Dropping or removing the father’s last name from the children’s birth certificate, even if their birth right is illegitimate, must go through a court order.  It is not considered a clerical error and therefore, changing the child’s last name cannot be done by simply filing a petition for clerical error.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/born-after-august-3-1988

Ad

Change of First Name

Liezel is a 34-year-old mom who has been using two first names all her life.  All her documents and transactions show her first name as Maria Liezel: on her marriage contract, on her children’s birth certificate, her land titles, and tax declarations.  Even her bank accounts and driver’s license show her name as Maria Liezel.  However, on her PSA birth certificate, her first name is indicated only as Liezel. No Maria or Ma.

  1. Is this considered a clerical error?
  2. Does she need to have her name on her children’s birth certificates corrected to make it consistent with what is reflected on her birth certificate?

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority website (www.psa.gov.ph), such errors can be corrected under R.A. 10172 (Civil Registration Laws).  Liezel’s case is not considered as clerical error (the missing Liezel from her first name).  What she needs to do is have her name on her birth certificate changed from Liezel to Maria Liezel under R.A. 10172.

To process this, Liezel needs to do the following:

  • Submit a petition for change of first name.  This shall be in the form of an affidavit, subscribed and sworn to before any person authorized by law to administer oaths.
  • The affidavit shall set forth facts necessary to establish the merits of the petition, showing affirmatively that the petitioner is competent to testify to the matters stated.
  • The petitioner shall state the particular erroneous entry or entries, which are sought to be corrected and / or the change sought to be made.
  • The petition shall be supported with the following documents:
    • A certified true machine copy of the certificate or of the page of the registry book containing the entry or entries sought to be corrected or changed;
    • At least two (2) public or private documents showing the correct entry or entries upon which the correction or change shall be based;
    • Other documents which the petitioner or the city or municipal civil registrar or the consul general may consider relevant and necessary for the approval of the petition.
  • The petition for change of first name shall be published at least once a week for two consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation.
  • Petitioner shall submit a certificate from the appropriate law enforcement, agencies that he has no pending case or no criminal record.
  • The fees to be collected for this type of petition shall be determined by the city or municipal civil registrar.  Indigent petitioners are exempted from paying the said fee.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/civil-registration-laws/republic-act-no-10172

Ad

Legitimation

When a child is born out of wedlock, his or her birthright is marked as illegitimate.  The child carries the last name of his mother unless he is acknowledged by his father on paper or his parents decide to get married later on.  Should it be the latter, the child is able to carry the father’s last name by virtue of a legitimation process.  This means that the illegitimate child’s birthright shall be changed to legitimate without the need of a court order.

Such is the story of Dess, an illegitimate child whose parents got married before she turned 10 years old.  Her parents worked on her legitimation right after they got married so that Dess can rightfully carry her father’s last name.  However, when they requested for a copy of her PSA birth certificate to complete her college graduation document requirements, they found out that no changes on her last name, nor any annotations, were applied on her birth certificate. She was still marked as illegitimate and still bears her mother’s maiden last name as her last name.

What could have happened?

Dess and her parents already had a copy of her Certificate of Legitimacy.  This was the document they received from the LCR when they filed for her legitimation.  On their copy, there is an annotation that read:

Legitimated by subsequent marriage of parents (mother’s maiden name) and (father’s name) on (date of marriage) at (place of marriage) under Reg. No. XXXX-XXX.  Hence, the child should now use the name (name of child using father’s surname).

Dess has been using the name Odessa Castro Talajib – Talajib being her father’s last name – since she was 11 years old.

Dess’ parents should have submitted to the PSA the Certificate of Legitimacy that they got from the LCR when they filed for her legitimation.  This would have triggered PSA’s certification and updating of Dess’ records in PSA’s files.  In other cases, the LCR where the legitimation was applied for, may also submit the Certificate of Legitimacy on the client’s behalf.  You just need to make constant follow-ups to make sure that the documents are duly processed.

For our information, here is the list of requirements when filing the Certificate of Legitimacy at the PSA:

Legitimation by Subsequent Marriage

  1. Secure the following documents from the city / municipal Civil Registrar’s Office (C/MCR) where the birth of the child was recorded:
    • Affidavit of Paternity / Acknowledgement (Certified Photocopy)
    • Joint Affidavit of Legitimation
    • Certificate of Registration of Legal Instrument (Affidavit of Legitimation)
    • Certified True Copy of Birth Certificate with remarks/annotation based on the legitimation by subsequent marriage.
  2. Verify the original birth certificate at the National Statistics Office (NSO).  If negative result, secure it from the C/MCR Office where the child was originally registered (certified photocopy).
  3. Verify the marriage contract of parents at NSO.  If negative result, secure it from the C/MCR Office where the marriage was solemnized (certified true copy).

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/content/application-requirements

Ad

 

No Middle Name

When an illegitimate child is born, it is likely that he will be given his mother’s last name as his last name.  In which case, the middle name field on his certificate of live birth will be left blank.

There are two possible scenarios to be observed when correcting or supplying a middle name on an illegitimate child’s birth certificate:

a. If the child is acknowledged by the father.

To supply the omitted middle name on the child PSA birth certificate, a supplemental report should be filed.  The supplemental report may be filed by the owner of the birth certificate (if of age), his spouse, children, his parents, siblings, grandparents, guardians, or any other person duly authorized by law or by the owner of the birth certificate.

If the owner was born in the Philippines, he needs to file the supplemental report at the LCR office where his birth was registered.  If born abroad, he needs to file this at the Philippine Consulate of the country where he was born.  In case he is already permanently residing in the Philippines, he needs to provide supporting documents which shall then be forwarded to the Department of Foreign Affairs.

b. If the child is not acknowledged by the father.

If the child’s biological father fails to acknowledge the child, the middle name shall not be supplied anymore and the child shall carry his mother’s maiden last name as his last name.

On the other hand, legitimate children should always have a middle name indicated on their birth certificates.  In case this entry is missing, a supplemental report, containing the reason why the child’s middle name was omitted, must be filed at the LCR where the child’s birth was registered.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/no-middle-name

Ad

No BC_Illegitimate_No Mother

Alona is an illegitimate child, born to parents who were barely out of their teens.  Her mother gave her up for adoption when she was just a few days old, in exchange for a plane ticket from Manila to Iloilo.  She was never heard of from again.  Upon learning that his daughter was given to a complete stranger, Dexter (Alona’s father) requested for assistance from the barangay so he can take his daughter back.  After negotiating with the family who paid for Alona’s adoption, Dexter was finally able to take his daughter home and promised to do everything he can to raise her on his own.

Father and daughter sailed from Manila to Dumaguete and there, Alona grew up in her grandparents’ farm house while Dexter continued his studies in Cebu.

Alona is all grown up now and would like to apply for a passport so she can work abroad.  Her only problem is that she does not have a birth certificate and is clueless on how to get one.  Her father, Dexter, told her that she was born in Manila but since they have both migrated to Dumaguete, he is not sure if Alona’s birth can be registered in Dumaguete.

She has three problems:

  1. Alona does not have a birth certificate.
  2. She has not heard from her mother ever since she was born and in spite of several attempts to get in touch with her mother, all her efforts returned futile.
  3. She no longer lives in the city where she was born.

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website (www.psa.gov.ph) , cases such as this can be worked out by filing for an Out-of-town (because she no longer lives in the city where she was born), Delayed Reporting of Birth.

The requirements for delayed registration of birth are in this previous article we posted last month.  Once Alona has these documents on hand, she can present these to the civil registrar of the LCRO of Dumaguete who shall then forward the documents to the Manila City Hall for proper registration.

Since Alona is an illegitimate child and born on September 21, 1990, there is the issue on her last name and her parents’ acknowledgment of her birth.  Only her father is present, and essentially, willing to acknowledge her as his child.

According to the PSA, if the child’s birth certificate is not yet registered and the father acknowledges his paternity over the child, the child can use the father’s last name following the procedures for R.A. 9255.

Since Dexter wanted for Alona to use his last name on her birth certificate, they need to include these documents when filing for Alona’s registration of birth:

  1. Affidavit to Use Surname of Father (AUSF)
  2. Consent of the child, if 18 years old and over at the time of the filing of the document (this applies to Alona).
  3. Any two of the following documents showing clearly the paternity between the father and the child:
    • Employment records
    • SSS / GSIS records
    • Insurance
    • Certificate of membership in any organization
    • Statement of Assets and Liabilities
    • Income Tax Return (ITR)

Sources:

https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/technical-notes-vital-statistics

http://www.psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/birth-certificate-not-yet-registered-and-father

http://www.census.gov.ph/civilregistration/republic-act-9255

Ad

Middle Name is Middle Initial

A comedy of errors.  That’s how Geraldine would describe the root cause of the problem she had with her birth certificate.  And she did not realize this until after she graduated from college and is now working on her papers to take the board exams for nurses.

Her full name is Geraldine Tee Garduque.  The name written on her PSA birth certificate is Geraldine T. Garduque.

How do you repair this mistake?

According to the website of the Philippine Statistics Authority (www.psa.gov.ph), this error can be corrected by filing a petition for correction of clerical error under the provisions of R.A. 9048.  This is the act that authorizes the Local Civil Registry office to apply corrections on typographical errors on civil registry documents without the need for a court order.

Who shall file:

  • Owner of the record
  • Owner’s spouse
  • Children
  • Parents and Siblings
  • Grandparents
  • Guardian
  • Other person duly authorized by law or by the owner of the document sought to be corrected;
  • If owner of the record is a minor or physically or mentally incapacitated, petition may be filed by his spouse, or any of his children, parents, siblings, grandparents, guardians, or persons duly authorized by law.

Where to file:

  • Petitioner must file at the LCR office where the birth was registered.  If he has transferred to a different location, the petition may also be filed at the LCR of his current city or municipality.
  • If owner of certificate was born abroad, the petition must be filed with the Philippine Consulate where the birth was reported.

Supporting Documents:

  • Certified machine copy of the birth record containing the entry to be corrected.
  • Not less than two (2) private or public documents upon which the correction shall be based like baptismal certificate, voter’s affidavit, employment record, GSIS/SSS records, medical records, business records, driver’s license, insurance, land titles, certificate of land transfer, bank passbook, NBI / Police Clearance, civil registry records of ascendants.
  • Notice / Certificate of Posting

Source: http://www.psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/middle-initial-entered-birth-certificate-instead-full

Ad

%d bloggers like this: