Tag Archive: nso late registration


Delayed Registration of Birth

In a previous article, we tackled the issue of some Pinoys not having birth records with the Philippine Statistics Authority or PSA (formerly National Statistics Office or NSO).  In most cases, the owner of the certificate need to consult with the LCR where his birth was supposedly registered and check if the LCR has a copy of his registration.  The copy is then endorsed to the PSA for proper certification so that  the owner can get his birth certificate in PSA’s Security Paper.

But what if your birth was not registered at all?  If you were born in 1949 and earlier years, there is also a chance that the PSA does not have a record of your birth.

How does one acquire a birth certificate years after he was born?

According to the website of the PSA, a vital event reported beyond the reglementary period is considered delayed.  The birth of a child must be reported to the LCR office of the child’s birthplace, not less than 30 days after birth.  Any registration made beyond the reglementary period shall be considered delayed and necessary justification shall be required.

Here are the requirements for delayed registration of birth; these shall be submitted at the LCR office of the city or municipality where the person was registered.  Additional documents shall be required in case the requesting party is not the mother of the child:

a). Four (4) copies of the Certificate of Live Birth duly accomplished and signed by the proper parties;

b). Accomplished Affidavit for Delayed Registration at the back of the Certificate of Live Birth by the father, mother, or guardian, declaring therein, among other things, the following:

  • Name of child
  • Date and place of birth
  • Name of the father if the child is illegitimate and has been acknowledged by him
  • If legitimate, the date and place of marriage of parents
  • Reason for not registering the birth within thirty (30) days after the date of birth.
  • If the person being registered is 18 years old and above and is already married, he needs to submit a copy of his Certificate of Marriage as well.

You may inquire at the LCR how soon the birth certificate can be made available at the PSA.  Feel free to ask as well how your application for delayed registration of birth will be processed; the LCR will be glad to explain this to you.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/content/processes-delayed-registration-vital-events

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Registered Twice

While some parents fail to properly register their newborn babies at the Local Civil Registry office, therefore resulting to Late Registration when the need for the child’s birth certificate arises, others do it not once, but twice (I hope not more than that!).  The following are just some of the reasons why this happens:

  • I wanted to change my child’s name;
  • I wanted to remove the name of my ex-husband from my child’s birth certificate;
  • My parents-in-law interfered with the child’s birth registration; and
  • We got a Negative Certification from the NSO so we went ahead and registered our child again (thinking that that is the only solution). 

At the end of the day, an individual whose birth has been registered twice will still have the same question: So which of the two birth certificates should I use?

Resty Mendoza got the shock of his life when, upon receiving his birth certificate, he saw that his name and birth place were different from what he has been using and declaring all his life!  He knew his real name was Restituto Alain Mendoza and that he was born in Camarines Sur (where he now resides).  The birth certificate he received from the mail says that his name is Ferdinand Alain Mendoza and that he was born in Pasay City.  All the rest of the information were correct: his parents’ names and birth places and his birthday.  All except his name and birthplace.

When he showed his parents the copy of the birth certificate he received, they confirmed that they had indeed registered his birth in Pasay City, a few weeks after he was born.  When the family moved to Camarines Sur, they requested for a copy of his birth certificate at the NSO in the area and were advised that the NSO did not have a copy of his birth certificate.  Instead of checking with the Pasay LCR, his parents filed a late registration of his birth certificate and took the opportunity to change his name and his place of birth.  They realized now that the LCR in Pasay may have endorsed a copy of his birth registration after all and now the PSA (formerly NSO) has the first copy of his birth certificate.

Resty will be graduating from college soon and the school required him to submit a copy of his PSA birth certificates (formerly NSO birth certificate).  Which birth certificate must he use now?

This time, Resty and his parents consulted the LCR in Camarines Sur and they were advised that the entries in his first birth registration are considered as his true and official birth details – especially his name and birthplace.  Since he is graduating, he will have to advise his school that his real name is Ferdinand and that to avoid confusion on his future transactions, his school records and diploma should now bear Ferdinand as his first name.

To avoid further expenses and delays in completing his school requirements, Resty agreed to use the details in his PSA birth certificate.  Although it will take a long time before he starts responding to the name “Ferdinand”, he knows that it is the best thing to do at that point.

His friends and families continued calling him “Resty” as his nickname.  And he has not failed to explain to new acquaintances how his nickname was coined when his real name is actually Ferdinand.  By doing this, he is also able to warn people of the hassles of registering a child’s birth twice.

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Wrong Birth Year

A PSA Birth Certificate (formerly NSO Birth Certificate) bearing an incorrect birth date and month of the owner can be corrected under R.A. 9048 (also known as the Clerical Error Law).  But what if it is the birth year that needs correction?  Is this still covered by R.A. 9048?  Let us find out.

Gelay was born on December 15, 2015 in Calapan City, Mindoro.  On the same date, at 8PM, Typhoon Melor struck the province and immediately rendered the entire town paralyzed with floodwaters and strong winds.  Her mother gave birth at home for fear of getting stranded on her way to the hospital.

It took weeks before their area was cleared.  Gelay’s parents were able to take her to the clinic for a check-up three weeks after she was born.  And although the health workers reminded them to get Gelay registered at the city hall as soon as possible, other more pressing concerns brought by the typhoon kept both parents busy.

On February 2016, Gelay’s Lola came to visit and immediately took on the task of taking care of the baby.  She asked if Gelay has been registered yet and if a copy of her birth certificate is already available.  Only then did Gelay’s parents realize that they still have not accomplished their daughter’s birth registration!

The Lola volunteered to process the registration herself.  She supplied all the information needed on the certificate however, she failed to double check on her granddaughter’s date of birth.  Instead of December 15, 2015, the Lola wrote January 15, 2016.

When her parents requested for a copy of Gelay’s PSA birth certificate, they realized that the birth date and year reflected arewrong.  When they consulted a friend who works at the Local Civil Registry office, they were advised that Gelay’s case is not covered by R.A. 9048 or the Clerical Error Law.  Therefore, correcting the birth date, month, and year is not going to be a simple task (at least not as simple as correcting a misspelled name or incorrect birth month and date).

Although Gelay’s birthday, as reflected on her PSA Birth Certificate, is only a month short from her true and correct date of birth, her parents still need to file a case in court to have this corrected.  This is because the year of her birth needs to be corrected too.

Persons seeking to have this kind of error corrected need to consult a lawyer to find out what processes are involved and fees that need to be paid.  Make sure that you are transacting with a person who is legally empowered to give you advice and charge you fees to get the corrections duly applied on your birth certificate.

Source: https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/civil-registration-laws/republic-act-no-10172-implementing-rules-and-regulations

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Bonjour. Mabuhay.

 

If you need late registration or endorsement services for your birth records, you might find this site useful:

 

http://verified.teleserv.ph/

 

The website says:

If you requested for a copy of your birth certificate from the National Statistics Office (NSO), and all you got was a notice informing you that there is no record of your birth certificate, we can help.

An NSO birth certificate on security paper (SECPA) is one of the most important documents that everyone needs to have. Unfortunately, some of us have problems securing a copy from the NSO. There are a lot of possible reasons for this but fortunately, we can help.

 

 

Maybe they can help you:)

 

Good luck peeps.

Bonjour. Mabuhay.

Specifics for a Birth Certificate late registration.

Hope this is useful:

DELAYED REGISTRATION OF BIRTH

1. The requirements are:

a) if the person is less than eighteen (18) years old, the following shall be required:

i) four (4) copies of the Certificate of Live Birth duly accomplished and signed by the proper parties;

ii) accomplished Affidavit for Delayed Registration at the back of Certificate of Live Birth by the father,             mother, or guardian, declaring therein, among other things, the following:

  • name of child;
  • date and place of birth;
  • name of the father if the child is illegitimate and has been acknowledged by him;
  • if legitimate, the date and place of marriage of parents; and
  • reason for not registering the birth within thirty (30) days after the date of birth

In case the party seeking late registration of the birth of an illegitimate child is not the mother, the party shall, in addition to the foregoing facts, declare in a sworn statement the recent whereabouts of the mother.

iii) any two of the following documentary evidences which may show the name of the child, date and              place of birth, and name of mother (and name of father, if the child has been acknowledged):

  • baptismal certificate;
  • school records (nursery, kinder-garten, or preparatory);
  • income tax return of parent/s;
  • insurance policy;
  • medical records; and
  • others, such as barangay captain’s certification.

iv) affidavit of two disinterested persons who might have witnessed or known the birth of the child.             (46:1aa)

b) If the person is eighteen (18) years old or above.

i) all the requirements for the person who is less than eighteen (18) years old; and

ii) Certificate of Marriage, if married. (46:1ba)

2. Delayed registration of birth, like ordinary registration made at the time of birth, shall be filed at the     Office of the Civil Registrar of the place where the birth occurred. (46:3)

3. Upon receipt of the application for delayed registration of birth, the civil registrar shall examine the     Certificate of Live Birth presented, whether it has been completely and correctly filled in and all     requirements have been complied with. (47a)

4. In the delayed registration of the birth of an alien, travel documents showing the origin and nationality of     the parents shall be presented in addition to the requirements mentioned in Rule 25 (1). (49:2a)

Bonjour. Mabuhay.

So you called the NSO Helpline (02)7371111 or went to the nearest NSO office to request your NSO birth certificate only to receive a copy saying that you don’t have a record of birth at the NSO. Whoa. Now what? Just when you need that NSO certificate, something like this happens. Well, I dug up some facts on what to do. Hope these help.

Delayed Registration of Birth

1. The requirements are:

a) if the person is less than eighteen (18) years old, the following shall be required:
i) four (4) copies of the Certificate of Live Birth duly accomplished and signed by the proper parties;
ii) accomplished Affidavit for Delayed Registration at the back of Certificate of Live Birth by the father, mother, or guardian, declaring therein, among other things, the following: • name of child; • date and place of birth; • name of the father if the child is illegitimate and has been acknowledged by him; • if legitimate, the date and place of marriage of parents; and • reason for not registering the birth within thirty (30) days after the date of birth

In case the party seeking late registration of the birth of an illegitimate child is not the mother, the party shall, in addition to the foregoing facts, declare in a sworn statement the recent whereabouts of the mother.

iii) any two of the following documentary evidences which may show the name of the child, date and place of birth, and name of mother (and name of father, if the child has been acknowledged):
• baptismal certificate;
• school records (nursery, kindergarten, or preparatory);
• income tax return of parent/s;
• insurance policy;
• medical records; and
• others, such as barangay captain’s certification.

iv) affidavit of two disinterested persons who might have witnessed or known the birth of the child.

b) If the person is eighteen (18) years old or above.
i) all the requirements for the person who is less than eighteen (18) years old; and
ii) Certificate of Marriage, if married.

2. Delayed registration of birth, like ordinary registration made at the time of birth, shall be filed at the Office of the Civil Registrar of the place where the birth occurred.

3. Upon receipt of the application for delayed registration of birth, the civil registrar shall examine the Certificate of Live Birth presented, whether it has been completely and correctly filled in and all requirements have been complied with.

4. In the delayed registration of the birth of an alien, travel documents showing the origin and nationality of the parents shall be presented in addition to the requirements mentioned in Rule 25.

Now let’s say you need to claim a benefit or an insurance for a close relative. They say you need to present a death certificate as part of the requirements. Say you experience the same thing: no record at NSO. This is what you got to do:

Delayed Registration of Death

No delayed report of death shall be accepted for registration unless the following procedures and requirements are observed and complied with by the concerned parties:

a) four (4) copies of Certificate of Death, which must be accomplished correctly and completely;

b) affidavit for delayed registration which shall be executed by the hospital or clinic administrator if the person died in a hospital, clinic or in a similar institution, or by the attendant at death if the person died elsewhere. In default of the hospital or clinic administrator or attendant at death, the affidavit shall be executed by any of the nearest relative of the deceased, or by any person having legal charge of the deceased when the latter was still alive;

c) the affidavit referred to shall state among other things, the name of the deceased, the facts of his death, the date and place of burial or cremation, and the circumstances why the death was not reported for registration within thirty (30) days after death;

d) authenticated copy of the certificate of burial, cremation, or of other means of corpse disposal; and

e) approval for registration by the health officer in the box provided in the Certificate of Death.

The same goes for marriage certificates so make sure you get your marriage records in order.

Delayed Registration of Marriage

In delayed registration of marriage, the solemnizing officer or the person reporting or presenting the marriage certificate for registration shall be required to execute and file an affidavit in support thereof, stating the exact place and date of marriage, the facts and circumstances surrounding the marriage, and the reason or cause of the delay.

Hope these info help. Stay tuned for more or feel free to ask so we can find out together.:)

You can request for your NSO certificates by calling the NSO Helpline 737-1111 or by online chat at www.birthcertificates.com.ph


Registration information originally published on http://www.census.gov.ph

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