Tag Archive: No Smoking


07 - 24 -2 (2)

Executive Order 26, or the Establishment of Smoke-free Environment in Public and Enclosed Places has been in effect since midnight of July 23, 2017.  The Philippines is now a No Smoking Country!

Below is a quick summary of the places and conveyances covered by this law and what awaits those that will be caught violating this much-anticipated and badly-needed ordinance:

You can no longer smoke in:

  • Schools, Colleges, and Universities (yes, even and especially in State Universities!)
  • Playgrounds
  • Restaurants and food preparation areas
  • Elevators
  • Basketball courts
  • Stairwells
  • Fire hazard risk areas such as gas stations, health centers, clinics, public and private hospitals.
  • Hotels
  • Malls
  • Jeepneys, taxis, trains, tricycles, buses, and planes.

Adults should no longer send minors to buy cigarettes for them; more importantly, minors should not be made to “light” cigarettes for their elders, sell cigarettes, distribute, or promote tobacco products in any way.

Sari-sari stores and other retail establishments are no longer allowed to showcase tobacco advertisements at points-of-sale.

How will violators be penalized?

Violators will be fined for breaking the law.  Penalties range from Php500 to Php10,000 and possible imprisonment.  Establishment owners, building managers, and other individuals authorized in managing specific places, offices, and businesses shall be held liable for violations done within their premises.  The public is encouraged to report violations to the DOH hotline (02) 711 1002.

Where then can smokers smoke?

Smoking is allowed only in designated smoking areas (DSA).  These areas should be properly marked and identified in an area or a building.  These could be open spaces within an area or a separate room with proper ventilation, with ample visual warnings on the effects of smoking, and has passed the provisions of non-smoking buffer zones.

The Executive Order does not cover vapes and e-cigarettes.

Sources:

www.doh.gov.ph

www.news.abs-cbn.com

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05 - 19

The President has signed Executive Order No. 26, banning smokers from puffing toxic tobacco fumes in public and enclosed places.

Below is a summary of EO No. 26 entitled: “Providing for the establishment of smoke-free environments in public and enclosed spaces,”

  1. Enclosed and public spaces include public transportation, whether in motion or stopped at a traffic light or on a roadside.
  2. Establishments must assign a Designated Smoking Area (DSA) following the standards provided in the EO.  DSAs may be an open space or a separate area with proper ventilation.
  3. DSAs in an enclosed space must not have an opening where cigarette-smoke-contaminated air may escape into smoke-free areas of the enclosure (buildings, rooms, public transportation), save for a “single door with an automatic door closer”.
  4. Only one DSA is allowed per building and transportation and must have a clear signage identifying that area as a smoking area.
  5. DSAs must have a non-smoking buffer zone, the combined area of both must not be larger than 20% of the total floor area of the building or transportation.
  6. Minors are not allowed to enter DSAs and its buffer zone.
  7. The following are not allowed to have a DSA at all:
    • Centers of youth activity such as playschools, preparatory schools, elementary schools, high schools, colleges and universities, youth hostels, and recreational facilities for minors.
    • Elevators and stairwells.
    • Locations where fire hazards are present.
    • Premises of private and public hospitals, as well as medical, dental, and optical clinics.
    • Food preparation areas.
  8. Persons-in-charge such as mangers or presidents of establishments, building administrators are prohibited from tolerating smoking public places surrounding their buildings and places of assignment.
  9. Sale, distribution, purchase of tobacco products to and from minors are prohibited.
  10. Tobacco advertisements and promotional materials (kiosks, special offer booths, etc.) are prohibited within 100 meters from the perimeter of a school, public playground, and other facilities where minors often converge or stay.
  11. Violators of provisions on providing tobacco products to minors may be fined Php 5,000, imprisoned of up to 30 days, or revocation of business licenses and permits.
  12. Violators of the rules for smoking in public places may be fined Php 500 up to Php 10,000.

The EO will be enforced 60 days after ongoing publication in broadsheets nationwide.

Sources:

www.cnnphilippines.com

www.rappler.com

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03 - 07

Last October (2016), news broke out that the government is poised to implement a nationwide “No Smoking” policy that will make smoking in public areas (indoor or outdoor) basically, illegal.  Less than 5 months later, the President declared that he will be signing the EO anytime now.

Good news, eh?

The anticipated new law aims to make all public places in the country 100% smoke-free.

What else can be expected from this new, upcoming law?

  • The EO will mandate all government agencies, including local governments to implement the smoking ban in all public places.
  • All public places, whether indoor or outdoor, shall be considered “No Smoking” areas.  These include: parks, bus stations, and vehicles.
  • Local government units are encouraged to draft their ordinances to implement the E.O.

This may as well be one of the biggest, if not the biggest campaign launched by the government against smoking.  In 2015, the government required all cigarette manufacturers and advertisers to include graphic images of people stricken with diseases caused by cigarette smoking.  These must be clearly printed alongside text warnings of the hazards of smoking.  It was intended to discourage the public from consuming cigarettes.  However, the Philippines’ “sachet economy” kept buyers from looking at the graphic images long enough to help them quit smoking.  In the country, vendors sell cigarettes by stick (seldom by pack).  This is a win-win situation between buyer and seller: the buyer is saved from staring at the graphic images (usually that of a swollen, gangrened foot or mouth) and the seller makes more money from retailing each pack (than selling it per pack).

The upcoming Executive Order that will free all public places from cigarette smoke takes the game to a level playing field.  The nation looks forward to finally breathing cigarette smoke-free air in public places very soon.

Source: http://news.abs-cbn.com/news/03/06/17/duterte-to-sign-eo-on-smoking-ban-nationwide

Related article: No Smoking in the Philippines

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No Smoking in the Philippines!

10-11

In one of my recent trips to the Manila City Hall, I spotted a guy casually smoking a cigarette right outside the office of a city Councilor.  As I walked further down the hallway (which was lined with the offices of several other councilors) I saw more people puffing sticks after sticks of cigarettes.  If you are a non-smoker, you will find it extremely challenging to pass by these halls or sit by the concrete benches.  When I left the area half an hour later, I smelled like an ashtray and had a bit of headache from all the cigarette fumes I inhaled.

When the President signs the Executive Order that will ban smoking from all public places in the entire country, I wouldn’t have to worry about getting stuck in an area filled with other people’s cigarette smoke.  Once the drafted Executive Order is signed, smoking will be banned in all public places such as parks, bus stations and other public transportation terminals, alleyways between buildings, sidewalks, and even inside a vehicle as this is considered a public area.

The Department of Health is steadfast in monitoring the official implementation of the total smoking ban policy in the country. They are also moving towards having RA 9211, or the act regulating the packaging, use, sale, distribution, and advertisement of tobacco products amended to address gray areas like point-of-sale advertisements and designation of smoking areas.

Fresh, smoke-less air, anyone?

Tell us what you think about this latest news from the government.

Source:

http://www.mb.com.ph/eo-on-nationwide-smoking-ban-out-this-month/

http://www.gov.ph/2003/06/23/republic-act-no-9211/

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Bonjour. Mabuhay.

I;m sure you all know about the new smoking ban in the Metro.
In case you want to report yuing matitigas ang ulo, these are the numbers to call:

MMDA: 136
LTFRB: 0921448777

LTFRB kapag nasa public utility vehicle or private vehicle na smoking in a non smoking area with windows down.
Let’s do our part to help one another.

Bonjour. Mabuhay.

If you are a non-smoker, we can now finally get some reprieve from cigarette smoke by the new smoking ban set into place in Metro Manila.
Smokers can now only do their thing privately without non-smokers having to deal with it as well.
Here’s some news on this new development:
===============================

Smokers, beware: Starting this Monday, puffing away inside public transport, terminals, and other public places can result in uniformed personnel accosting you and imposing a fine.

Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA? chairman Francis Tolentino said government personnel will only be enforcing what is already in the law to protect innocents from second-hand smoke, which can be as deadly as inhaling directly from a cigarette.

Local government health and environmental sanitation officers, usually accompanied by policemen, will round up smokers starting May 30 — the eve of World No Tobacco Day.

“This enforcement drive is in accordance with the LTFRB’s earlier circulars, which covered public vehicles and terminals,” Tolentino said in an interview on dzBB radio Friday.

He said authorities plan to enforce the anti-smoking laws in loading and unloading areas.

But Tolentino admitted there are gray areas in the enforcement process, such as when motorists smoke from inside their private cars. He hinted the local city ordinance will apply in this case.

“Di maliwanag ang enforcement sa ganitong sitwasyon, pero meron tayong city ordinances na nagsasabing maging ang paninigarilyo sa loob ng private vehicles ay bawal. Pero sa ibang lugar pwede. Sa Caloocan 100 percent smoke-free, sa ibang lugar hindi,” he said.

Tolentino cited Republic Act 9211 (Tobacco Regulation Act of 2003) and the smoking prohibitions of the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) and all local ordinances and issuances as bases for the new drive.

Violators will be fined P500 on first offense, while those who cannot afford to pay the fine are obliged to render an eight-hour community service, the MMDA said in a news release.

The MMDA said the drive coincides with the observance of the 100% Smoke-Free Environment campaign on Monday and the World No Tobacco Day.

World No Tobacco Day is marked on May 31, according to the World Health Organization.

On Monday, Tolentino and the 17 Metro mayors and LTFRB Chairman Nelson Laluces will officially launch the “100% Smoke-Free Metro Manila” in simple rites at the MMDA headquarters in Makati City.

During Monday’s rites, local chief executives will jointly sign a commitment contract affirming their participation and sustained enforcement of the Tobacco Regulation Act with the end-goal of achieving a smoke-free Metro Manila by 2012.

The MMDA noted New York-based Bloomberg Philantrophies has approved a P9.5-million grant to finance the anti-tobacco use program.

In mid-June last year, the MMDA intensified its no-smoking campaign within its premises as required by a Civil Service Commission (CSC) directive ordering a total smoking ban in all government offices.

“We must be very strict in implementing our anti-smoking regulation. We want the MMDA to become a model government agency in terms of compliance with the CSC policy,” Tolentino said.

Since last year, the MMDA has been conducting a series of advocacy meetings and planning workshops with the 17 LGUs to get them to enact their own anti-smoking ordinances.

MMDA traffic enforcers, members of the Philippine National Police and even those from the LGUs have likewise been trained to enforce the provisions of RA9211.

“We should transform Metro Manila into a smoke-free community. A healthy Metro Manila is a healthy and progressive Philippines,” Tolentino added. — LBG, GMA News

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