Tag Archive: Land Transportation Office


June 11

Getting a ticket for a traffic or vehicle regulation violation means you will not only have to stop and spend a good 15 to 20 minutes negotiating with a traffic enforcer but also that you will have to pay the prescribed fee for the violation you committed.  It is both a pain in your schedule and your pocket that is why most drivers do everything in their capacity to avoid (or sometimes, evade!) these violations.

Among these violations are driving without a valid license which will cost you Php 3,000, reckless driving at Php 2,000 for the first offense, and parking violations that start at Php 1,000 for the first offense.

Today we will feature the violations that have stiffer penalties (translation: they cost a fortune!); these fines are so dear that the average Pinoy driver’s only means to pay for it is by completely avoiding the violation altogether.

  1. Driving a right-hand drive vehicle – Php 50,000

So your car was imported from Europe… big deal.

You should not be driving a right-handed vehicle in the Philippines unless you have Php 50,000 to spare for LTO.  This violation was only recently added to the list when car smuggling became a rampant case n the 2010s.  Also, driving a right-hand vehicle in the Philippines could pose more risk to drivers and pedestrians.

Should you insist in driving your RHD car in main thoroughfares (and you get caught!), your precious car will be impounded until you are able to have it corrected (translation: made into a left-hand drive vehicle).

  1. Driving a vehicle that has defective devices or is installed with improper or unauthorized accessories – Php 5,000

That’s not a collective amount, mind you.  You will be fined Php 5,000 for EVERY violation found in your car.  Example: your signal lights are not working, that’s Php 5,000; you have a carrier on the roof of your car that does not meet the standards of the LTO, that’s another Php 5,000.

  1. Passengers not wearing seatbelts – Php 1,000 (private cars), Php 3,000 (PUVs).

This law (yes, it’s a law!) that is meant to protect you from harm (similar to the law on the use of helmets for motorcycle drivers and passengers).  And so if you get penalized for not obeying this particular law, you are actually being fined for not loving your life enough to save it by wearing a seatbelt.

If a traffic enforcer sees you or your passenger not wearing your seatbelts, the driver will be fined the corresponding fees for private cars and PUVs, plus the driver’s license will be suspended for a week.  Ugh if you are a PUV driver.

  1. Smoke Belching – Php 2,000 (first offense)

If you and your car cause other drivers and pedestrians to cover their noses when you zoom past, you are smoke belching.  It also means that your car is in bad shape and should not be allowed on the road.

Should you insist, you will be fined Php 2,000 and who knows how much more after your first offense.

  1.  Fraudulent registration of your car – Php 3,000

The LTO would know when you have overlooked or failed to renew your car’s registration.  On the other hand, your car’s registration is one of the first things a traffic enforcer or the police look for when you are flagged for a traffic violation.  If your papers are not updated, then better prepare for a hefty fine and the risk of you not being able to drive your car for a year.

It is never wise to forego your responsibility in renewing your car’s registration; you will always end up spending more.

 

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

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May 15-1

Renewing your driver’s license and car registration has become so much simpler and faster now that the Land Transportation Office (LTO) has launched their LTO Online Personal Appointment and Scheduling System or PASS.   Applicants may now simply set an appointment at any of the four LTO branches that offer the PASS service to ensure that they will be attended to during their visit.

The system is seen to reduce the entire renewal process to just 45 minutes, a far cry from the usual 4-hour wait time for walk-in transactions.

How does the LTO PASS Work?

You only need to visit the LTO Online System at https://www.lto.net.ph and book your appointment.  You will be required to key in your address and contact details, as well as your driver’s license number.  Don’t worry, the site runs on a secure platform with an HTTPS encryption so all your information is safe and cannot be accessed by hackers.

Is this open to all areas that have an LTO branch?

LTO is currently running the project in five pilot branches in Metro Manila but their direction is to have it available nationwide.  Here are the branches that accept appointments made through the LTO PASS system:

  1. Central Office in East Avenue, Quezon City
  2. Novaliches, Quezon City
  3. Marikina
  4. Muntinlupa
  5. Pasig City

The agency is targeting to have all branches activated with the PASS by the end of the year.  While the roll-out is ongoing, the LTO will continue to accept walk-in applicants for driver’s license and car registration renewal.

For now, the PASS facility will only be accepting renewal transactions for driver’s license and car registration.  All other transactions are still on a first-come, first-served basis.

How to use the PASS online facility:

  1. Log on to the site https://www.lto.net.ph/LTO/Online and prepare to provide the following information:
  • Driver’s License Details
    • Driver’s License Number
    • Birthdate
  • License Holder’s Information
    • First, Middle, and Last Names
    • Home Address
    • Email Address
    • Mobile Number
  1. Click on Drive’s License Renewal or Motor Vehicle Renewal.
  2. Read the terms and conditions. Tick the small box at the bottom of the page to agree to the terms.
  3. Enter the CAPTCHA code and click Continue.
  4. Fill out the online appointment form and submit.
  5. Choose the branch, date, and time you wish to have the renewal processed. The system is able to determine if your license is already about to expire and will only take you to the scheduling page if your license is up for renewal.
  6. A confirmation email will be sent to you as soon as you are done booking an appointment online. Save this and show it to the LTO staff on the day of your appointment.

Try this new system from the LTO and let us know about your experience!

References:

http://www.lto.gov.ph

https://www.lto.net.ph/LTO/Online

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May 09

When I first learned how to drive, I was made to memorize the mnemonic BLOWBAG, which stood for Battery, Lights, Oil, Water, Brakes, Air, and Gas.  It helped me get started on responsible driving and car ownership.  It has become second nature to me, checking all items under BLOWBAG before I leave my garage, every single day.

This year, I was surprised to learn that the mnemonic has evolved into something new, something more catchy.  And I am glad to know that they have included more items to check that are equally important as the original BLOWBAG.  Thanks to the PNP-Highway Patrol Group for coming up with BLOWBAGETS!

Since I find this helpful (and fun!), let me share with you some insights about this new driving mnemonic as my way of encouraging fellow car owners and drivers to be more responsible to prevent accidents and car breakdowns, especially when taking long drives this summer.

What’s in BLOWBAGETS?  Read on!

  1. Battery

You try to start your engine but all it gives you is nothing short of a scoff or snicker.  You try it again and get the same response.  Uh-oh.  Your battery may have died on you.  For some weird reason, my car would give me warning signals that its batteries are about to go out.  Weeks before it dies, my car alarm would often go crazy, sounding off for no reason at all.

I am just thankful that it has not died on me in a remote area or in the dead of the night, or when I am faced with an emergency.  Still, I need to remind myself that checking my car’s battery for clean terminals, proper cable-to-terminal connections, and charge will save me the hassle of having to change my batteries in public and right when I am rushing to get home or to the office.

Car batteries normally take three to four years before they burn out.  It helps to keep a record of when you had yours replaced so you could estimate when you would need a replacement.

  1. Lights

This is easy.  I simply ask someone to stand in front and at the back of the car while I test my headlights, break, signal, and tail lights.  I am especially concerned about my lights when I will be driving at night.

Apart from the bulbs working, you also need to be sure that the lights are free from dirt, cracks, and breakage.

  1. Oil

This one I learned to do when I was 9 years old.  I thought it was fun pulling out the oil dipstick and checking to see for any change in oil color or level.  I realized later on that the oil is a critical element in the car engine’s life as too little of it can cause serious damages in the car’s moving parts.

Check your car’s engine oil everyday for color, level, and leaks.  Know when it is time to refill to avoid expensive repair bills.

  1. Water

Is there enough water in your radiator?

Always check to see that your radiator is properly hydrated, especially during the summer season.  Those water bottles that jeepney and taxi drivers keep in their trunk?  Those are first-aid remedies for overheated vehicles; you should keep some in your car too.

  1. Brakes

Nawalan ako ng preno, eh.

Nope, don’t let it happen to you.  How do you check if your brakes are working fine?  Step on the brake pedal and press all the way to the floor.  There should not be any resistance, air, or spongy feel to it.  If the brakes feel hard or seem like it is resisting your pressure, have it checked right away.

A personal precaution I observe too is the no-water-bottle-on-the-floor policy in my car.  I always remind my passengers to use the bottle holders found in the interior of the car and to never leave a water bottle lying on the floor.  These bottles could roll to the driver’s side and block the brake pedal without being noticed.

  1. Air

Do I know how to replace a flat tire?  Yes.

Do I like replacing a flat tire?  No.

Before leaving home, check that all your tires are properly inflated, free from bulges and any sharp objects that may be stuck to its surface.  If you are not comfortable checking with just your eyes, head over to the nearest gasoline station or vulcanizing shop to have each tire’s pressure gauged properly.

  1. Gas

That all important fuel that we all love to ignore.

Running out of gas while on the road is not only stressful, it’s embarrassing!  So don’t wait until your gas gauge starts flashing that annoying red light before you finally stop by a gas station.  Refill as soon as the pin goes a little below the half-tank meter.

  1. Engine

Best way to detect an engine problem?  Listen.

My dad would tell us to switch off our car’s A/C while on a long drive, roll down our windows, and listen to our car’s engine.  He likes doing this while we’re speeding down NLEX!  He loves listening to the engine’s hum.

If you are familiar with your engine’s sound, you would know right away if something is amiss, such as when you hear an unfamiliar tap, knock, or any other kind of noise that you are sure you haven’t heard from your engine before.

  1. Tires

Apart from it having the right air pressure, your tires must not be so worn out that the grooves have become too shallow.  I check mine by placing a one-peso coin into my tires’ grooves; if the coin goes almost all the way down, I’m good.  But if more than half of the coin remains visible, I’d know it’s time to buy new tires.

  1. Self

Am I sleepy?  Do I have alcohol in my system?  Am I disoriented, stressed, or suffering from one of my many migraine attacks?

Believe it or not, these can gravely affect your driving skills and may cause you and the people around you unnecessary harm.  Please do not go behind the wheel when you are experiencing any of the above conditions.  If you are sick and feel that you need to be taken to the hospital and no one is around to drive for you, hail a cab or request for a car from Grab instead.

Remember that even if your car is in tip-top shape, if you as the driver are not, you are still running the risk of damaging yourself and your vehicle.

Apart from all those, my dad would also remind us to always have the complete documents of our vehicles within our reach – keeping the original copies at home and photocopies in the car’s glove compartment.

There you have it, folks!  A new mnemonic that drivers and soon-to-be drivers need to memorize by heart.  Share this will all the people you care about!  Drive safely!

Reference: www.gmanetwork.com

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07 - 13

In the second installment of our series on LTO Fines and Penalties for erring drivers, please take note that this includes offenses committed by public utility drivers and operators.

Today, we are going to feature violations in connection with number plates, equipment, parts, accessories, devices, and markings of motor vehicles.  Lady drivers are strongly advised to go over this list too.

  1. Violations in Connection with Number Plates
VIOLATION PENALTIES (PHP)
1. MV number plates not firmly attached. 200
2. Obscure plates. 200
3. License plates different from body number on Public Utility Motor Vehicle. 500
4. Improper display of a motor vehicle permanent plate. 500
5. Display / Use of an expired commemorative plates or stickers. 2,000
6. Tampered / Marked plates or stickers. 2,000
7. Illegal transfer or use of MV regularly issued MV plates, tags or stickers except security plates on authorized motor vehicle. 10,000

–          Owners/operators are conclusively presumed to have committed the illegal transfer.

–          Drivers of MV involved in illegal transfer of plates or stickers shall suffer the suspension of their DL for three months.

–          If the MV with illegal transferred plates or stickers is used in the commission of a crime, its owner shall suffer the penalty of P12,000 fine and suspension of plates and registration certificate and Official Receipt for two years.

 

2. Violations Relative to Equipment, Parts, Accessories, Devices, and Markings of Motor Vehicles.

VIOLATION PENALTIES (PHP)
1. Operating MV with metallic tires in any public highways. 5,000
2. Defective brakes. 500
3. Use or installation of unnecessary lights in front and rear of a motor vehicle 300
4. Operating motor vehicle without head, tail, plate, and / or brake lights. 300
5. Without muffler 150
6. Without wiper 150
7. Dirty or unsightly or unsanitary MV 300
8. Dilapidated or defective MV 1,000

–          To hold release of plates until defect is corrected.

9. Failure to paint or improper painting of authorized route our PUJ, Filcabs, Shuttle Services, trucks for hire, taxis, and similar for hire motor vehicles operating with fixed routes. 500

–          To hold plates until defect is correct.

10. Non-painting of business or trade name. 500

–          To hold plates until defect is corrected.

11. Use of unauthorized or improvised plates. 300
12. Without or defective hand brakes. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect.

13. Without or defective speedometer. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect.

14. Without or defective windshield wiper. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect.

15. Without rear view mirror. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect

16. Without interior light. 200

–          To hold plates pending correction of defect.

17. Without name or business name and address of operator inscribed on both sides of MV for hire. 500

–          To hold plates or OR/CR until defect is corrected.

18. Unauthorized use of bell, siren, or exhaust whistle. 15,000

–          Forfeiture of said gadgets in favor of the government.

19. Without functional spare tire. 300
20. Without red flag or red lights on projecting end of load extending more than a meter beyond the bed or body, and in the evening red lights visible at least 50 meters away. 500
21. Failure to paint plate number on a motor vehicle for hire. 500

–          To be imposed upon the owner/ operator.

22. Failure to carry EWD 150
23. Failure to install EWD 4 meters from the front and rear of the stalled motor vehicle. 500

–          To be imposed upon the owner/driver.

24. Without capacity marking 375

–          To be imposed upon the owner.

25. Unauthorized installation of jalousies, painted windshield or colored windshield. 600

–          To be imposed upon the owner/driver.

26. Installation of dim/colored lights, strobe lights, dancing lights or similar lights. 600

–          To be imposed upon the owner/operator or motor vehicle.

27. Use or installation of heavily tinted colored/painted windshield or window glass. 600

–          To be imposed upon the owner/operator sun visor or light tinted are allowed.

28. Without permanent tail gate with inscription “not for hire” sign in a private jeepney. 500

–          To be imposed upon the owner.

29. Use/installation of a glaring/stainless object upon at the front and/or rear of a motor vehicle. 500

–          To be imposed upon the owner/driver.

Tomorrow we will focus on illegal operation of motor vehicles and load limits.  If you are an operator or driver of a public utility vehicle, don’t miss our feature story tomorrow.

For questions on traffic violations, fines, and penalties, drop us a line here.  We will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

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07 - 11

Anong violation ko?

That is a common defense mechanism of most drivers who go against road rules but would like to dodge fines and penalties.  Does it work?  Well, sometimes it does (with the help of a few hundred bucks).  But most of the time, traffic enforcers choose to slap you with a ticket and worse, confiscate your driver’s license.

Being apprehended for a traffic violation is not such a bad thing.  We all need to learn a lesson or two in order not to commit the same errors in the future, don’t we?  What’s not good about the whole ticket-tubos hullabaloo is when the erring driver is made to pay more than what the law prescribed for his violation.  Has this happened to you before?

Arguing with corrupt enforcers will not get you anywhere.  Unless you know better than them, you will always end up on the losing end.  So to help drivers avoid paying more than what their violation requires, we researched on the LTO-approved rates for traffic and administrative violations’ fines and penalties.

Remember, knowledge is power.

Read on.

  1. Violations in Connection with Licensing
VIOLATION PENALTY (PHP)
1. Driving without license. 1,500
2. Driving with delinquent or expired license. 400
3. Driving with suspended or revoked or improper license. 1,000
4. Failure to carry Driver’s License 200
5. Failure to sign Driver’s License 200
6. Driving under the influence of liquor

First offense

Second offense

For subsequent violations after the second offense.

 

5,000 – and two months suspension of DL

5,000 – and three months suspension of DL

6,000 – and six months suspension of DL;

After third offense, automatic revocation of DL.

7. Driving under the influence of drugs 10,000 – and automatic revocation of license.
8. Allowing an unlicensed/improperly licensed person to drive a motor vehicle. 1,000 – and suspension of plates, registrations and Driver’s License for two months.
9. Possession and use of fake / spurious Driver’s License

– Driver has been issued an authentic license, it shall be suspended for one year in addition to the fine.

– Driver has not bee issued an authentic license, he shall be disqualified from securing a Driver’s License for a period of two years.

2,000
10. Conviction of the driver of a crime using a motor vehicle. 3,000
11. Student driver operating an MV without being accompanied by a licensed driver. 500
12. Unlicensed conductor of a motor vehicle for hire. 500
13. Operating / driving a motor vehicle which is unregistered / improperly registered or with invalid registration 2,000

–          If committed by the driver without the knowledge and consent of the owner/operator.

–          If the driver is also the owner / possessor of the subject motor vehicle.

4,000

–          In both cases the motor vehicle shall be impounded or the plates if any shall be confiscated and shall not be released until properly registered.

14. Operating a motor vehicle with unregistered substitute or replacement engine, engine block or chassis. 5,000

–          The subject MV shall be impounded until such parts are properly registered.

15. Failure to carry Certificate of Registration or Official Receipt of Registration. 150.00
16. Operating / allowing the operation of MV with a suspended / revoked Certified / Official Receipt of Registration 1,000

–          The subject MV shall be impounded and its plate held during the suspension.

–          In addition to the original suspension, the said MV and plates shall further be suspended for two years.

17. Tourist operating or allowing the use of non-Philippine registered motor vehicle beyond the 90 day period of his sojourn in the country. 5,000

–          The MV shall not be allowed to operate by the confiscation of its plates, OR and CR until properly registered.

–          In addition, if the driver is a holder of local driver’s license, the same shall be suspended for one month.

 Tomorrow we will feature violations in connection with number plates, equipment, parts, accessories, and markings on motor vehicles.  These lists will include public utility vehicles, especially those that operate under a franchise.  Please share these articles with all drivers you know, whether driving a private or public utility vehicle.

If you have questions regarding traffic violations and the corresponding penalties, send us a message and we will try our best to find the answers for you.

See you again tomorrow and drive safely!

Source: http://www.lto.gov.ph

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06 - 23 (1)

If your job requires that you drive a company vehicle or a public transportation, you need to get a Professional Driver’s License.  If you have had a Non-professional License all your life, how do you change it to Professional classification?  How do you change your name on your driver’s license after getting married?  How do you change erroneous entries in your license such as the spelling of your name and your birth date?

This is the second and last part of our series on Driver’s License Application Requirements.  Read and share!

A. CHANGE CLASSIFICATION TRANSACTIONS

  1. License Change Classification – Non-Professional to Professional
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
    • NBI and Police Clearance
      1. NBI
      2. Police Clearance
    • Current or Expired License
  2. License Change Classification – Professional to Non-Professional
    1. Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    2. Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
    3. Current or Expired License

B. REVISION OF RECORDS TRANSACTIONS

  1. Record Change – Incorrect Name/Birth Date
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Original Birth Certificate with Photocopy
      1. PSA Authenticated Birth Certificate with Official Receipt
    • Current or Expired License
    • Affidavit of Discrepancy
  2. Record Change – Change in Name
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Current or Expired License
    • Court Order Authorizing name change
      1. Certification from OMA for Change in Name
  3. Record Change – Change in Marital Status
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Current or Expired License
    • Photocopy of Marriage Contract or Court Order for annulled for Divorce Applicants or Passport with Amendments for change in Marital Status
      1. Court Order for Annulled or Divorced Applicants
      2. Passport with amendments for change in Marital Status
  4. Record Change – Change in Address
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Current or Expired License
  5. Record Change – Change in Citizenship
    • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
    • Current or Expired License
    • Passport for Change of Citizenship
      1. Alien Certificate of Registration
      2. Foreign License

C. ADDITIONAL RESTRICTION CODE

Additional Restriction Codes 1 to 8

  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

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06 - 22

Did you know that there are more than 10 types of driver’s license applications that can be done at the Land Transportation Office (LTO)?  The most common are Student Permits and Non-professional license applications, but it appears that these are just the tip of the iceberg. Farther are other types of applications for Conductor’s License, License Change Classification (from Non-Professional to Professional), Additional Restriction Codes, and so much more.

We are sharing the LTO’s list of license applications and the corresponding documentary requirements in today’s blog.  Keep this as a bookmark or print a hard copy to serve as your reference when transacting with the LTO.

I. STUDENT PERMIT TRANSACTIONS

  1. New Student Permit
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Original Birth Certificate with Photocopy
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines.
  1. Student Permit – Minor Applicants
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Original Birth Certificate with Photocopy
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Letter of Parental or Guardian Consent with one valid government-issued ID containing the signature of consenting Parent or Guardian.
  1. Student Permit – Foreigners
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines.
  • Original and photocopy of Passport
  • Alien Certificate of Registration I-card
  1. Student Permit – Minor Foreigners
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Original and photocopy of Passport
  • Alien Certificate of Registration I-card
  • Letter of Parental or Guardian Consent with one (1) valid government issued ID card containing the signature of consenting parent/guardian.

B. NEW LICENSE TRANSACTIONS

  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Valid Student Permit
  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional, Filipino, with valid foreign license
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
  • Photocopy of License (not in English)
  • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional, Filipino with expired foreign license
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
  • Photocopy of License (not in English)
  • Translation from Embassy to Consular Officer
  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional, Foreigner with valid foreign license
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines.
  • Original and Photocopy of Passport
    • Photocopy of Passport with entry at least one month and visa duration of at least one year from date of application.
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
  • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  1. New Driver’s License – Non-professional, Foreigner with expired foreign license
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Original and Photocopy of Passport
    • Photocopy of Passport with entry at least one month and visa duration of at least one year from date of application.
  • Photocopy of License (not in English)
  • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional
  • Properly accomplished application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician
  • Valid SPR (Student Permit)
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional, Filipino with valid foreign license
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines.
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
    • Photocopy of License (not in English)
    • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional, Filipino w/ expired foreign license
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
    • Photocopy of License (not in English)
    • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional, Foreigner w/ valid foreign license
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Original and Photocopy of Passport
    • Photocopy of Passport with entry of at least one (1) month and working visa duration of at least one (1) year from date of application
    • Photocopy of License (in English)
    • Photocopy of License (not in English)
    • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Driver’s License – Professional, Foreigner w/ expired foreign license
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Original and Photocopy of Passport
    • Photocopy of Passport with entry of at least one (1) month and working visa duration of at least one (1) year from date of application.
  • Photocopy of License (in English)
    • Photocopy of License (not in English)
    • Translation from Embassy or Consular Officer
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. New Conductor’s License
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Original Birth Certificate with Photocopy
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance

C. LICENSE RENEWAL TRANSACTIONS

  1. Non-Professional Driver’s License Renewal
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  1. Non-Professional Driver’s License Renewal – Dormant
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Expired License
  1. Professional Driver’s License Renewal
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  1. Professional Driver’s License Renewal – Dormant
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Expired License
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. Conductor’s License Renewal
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  1. Conductor’s License Renewal – Dormant
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Expired License
  • NBI
  • Police Clearance
  1. Advance Renewal Non-Professional
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  • Plane Ticket, Visa or Contract
  1. Advance Renewal Professional
  • Properly Accomplished Application for Driver’s License
  • Medical Certificate issued by any licensed physician practicing in the Philippines
  • Current or Expired License
  • Plane Ticket, Visa or Contract

Tomorrow we are going to include the list of requirements for Duplicate License transactions as well as Changes in License Classification, so make sure to visit us again tomorrow.

Source: www.lto.gov.ph

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05 - 18

The announcement that the Anti-distracted Driving Act will finally be enforced this week (today actually!) was met with a lot of questions from drivers, especially those that use navigation apps and other gadgets such as dash cameras.  If you read our previous article on this topic or have seen the news articles in the internet, you already have an idea of the exorbitant fees that will be charged anyone caught violating the law.  Quite obviously, the clamor for answers and clarifications was driven by the rather shocking fees you will have to pay if you so much as looked at your beeping phone while sitting behind the wheel.

We ran a research to find out what the Land Transportation Office (LTO) has to say about these questions.  We hope the following details gathered from the internet will help clear things out and set every driver’s mind at ease.

1.On the use of navigation apps installed on smartphones.

Question: Does this mean I could no longer use navigation apps while driving?

Answer: According to the LTO, drivers are still allowed to use these smartphone-based apps provided:

  • The driver sets the app BEFORE driving.
  • Uses a speaker to listen to the directions instead of looking at the smartphone screen.
  • Pulls over if he needs to reset his destination.

2. On the use of a mobile phone mount.

Question: Are mobile phone mounts included in the prohibitions?

Answer: No, for as long as the phone and the mount do not obstruct the driver’s view.

3. On the use of dash cameras.

Question: Should I now get rid of my dashcam?

Answer: Dashcams are allowed.  Just place it behind the rearview mirror so that, again, it does not obstruct the driver’s line of sight.

4. On the use of earphones while driving.

Question: Earphones are hands-free devices, am I allowed to use this while driving?

Answer: Yes but only to make or receive calls.  You should not use it to listen to music while on the road.

5. On heavily tinted cars whose drivers think they can “get away with it”.

Question: How will they know I’m using my mobile, they can’t see me!

Answer: This just in: The Department of Transportation now uses high-definition cameras that can detect light coming from devices inside heavily tinted cars.  Plus, enforcers are well-trained to distinguish if a driver is distracted by merely observing the car’s movement.

The law covers public and private vehicles, including bicycles, motorcycles, motorcycle taxis, “kalesas” or any other animal-driven wagons or carts.  Yes, no one is exempted, not even vehicles owned by the government.  According to the LTO Chief, violators can raise their contentions during the hearing at the LTO.  That simply means that enforcers will not let erring drivers slide and skedaddle without a violation ticket, no questions asked.

There you have it!  If you have other questions, feel free to post it here and we’ll try our best to dig deeper and find the answers for you.

Have a safe trip!

Reference: www.cnnphilippines.com

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CTPL

All car owners are required by the Land Transportation Office (LTO) to secure a Compulsory Third Party Liability (CTPL) insurance upon registering their car.

Some questions that most first-time vehicle owners ask about CTPL are:

  • Why do I need a CTPL?
  • Who are covered by the CTPL?  Who is the ‘third party’?
  • Is the basic CTPL from the LTO enough to cover our car insurance needs?
  • How is the CTPL different from a comprehensive car insurance?

To help us appreciate the value of maintaining a CTPL insurance for our vehicles, below are the details of its benefits and why the government mandates that all vehicles be covered with one.

  1. A CTPL protects ‘third parties’ from the possible damages that may arise from an accident involving the insured vehicle.  A car cannot be without this type of insurance coverage as it is required by law.
  2. ‘Third parties’, as defined under Section 373, Chapter VI of the Insurance Code of the Philippines, are the following:
    • Any person other than a passenger;
    • Not a member of the household, or a member of the family within the second degree of consanguinity or affinity of the vehicle owner;
    • Not his employee in respect to death, bodily injury, or damage to property arising out of and in the course of employment.
    • The vehicle owner’s friends and other persons who are not his relatives but are riding in his car are considered third parties, not passengers.
    • A ‘third party’ may either be inside or outside your car.
    • A passenger of a public utility vehicle becomes a ‘third party’ the moment he alights from the vehicle.
  3. ‘Passengers’ are defined the Insurance Code of the Philippines as:
    • Any fare paying person being transported and conveyed in and by a motor vehicle for transportation of passengers for compensation;
    • Persons expressly authorized by law or by the vehicle’s operator or his agent to ride without fare;
  4. The CTPL covers the car owner’s legal responsibility over the third party’s injury or death resulting from an accident involving the insured vehicle.  This means that the insurance will provide immediate financial assistance to the victim and his dependents while discharging the vehicle owner from liabilities.  All these shall be provided for regardless of the car owner’s financial capacity.  The current CTPL coverage is Php 100,000.00.
  5. Comprehensive car insurances have wider coverage than CTPL.  It includes insurance against damages and liabilities caused by collisions, fire, acts of God or nature, personal accident insurance of the passenger, and car theft.  Some insurances provide financial assistance for car repairs, regular maintenance check-ups, and roadside assistance.  It also costs more to acquire a comprehensive car insurance; it is optional, not mandated by law.

Make sure that your CTPL policy is genuine and updated.  Avoid entrusting your car registration documents to fixers and individuals posing as liaison officers for the LTO.  This is one important errand you need to get done personally to be sure that your vehicle is properly and legitimately registered and provided with a CTPL insurance.

Sources:

http://pinoyinsure.blogspot.com/2011/08/what-is-compulsory-third-party.html

http://business.inquirer.net/190568/is-car-insurance-a-necessity

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