Tag Archive: DTI


What Would You Wait In Line For?

1 Jan 29

Last Thursday, I found myself in a 90-minute line to see my obstetrician.  My high school best friend was in the area and she volunteered to accompany me while I waited for my turn.  Neither of us knew much about it but we were more than willing to endure the long wait as it gave us all the time we needed to catch up on each other’s lives.  I actually did not realize I sat in that long line for almost two hours until I saw the wall clock inside the doctor’s clinic when they finally called my name.  I shook my head in disbelief and silently thanked the heavens for sending my best friend right when I needed her the most. Because without her, I might have marched out of that line and went straight to emergency where a doctor is almost always available to see you — no way I am waiting for anybody for 90 minutes!

How many times have we been told to please wait, please hold, be patient, hold on just a little while longer?  And just how many times did we agree to do just that… sit still and wait?  I don’t remember the last time I agreed to a fast-food cashier’s “Willing to wait, Ma’am?” for my fried chicken meal.  In fact, every time I am asked if I am willing to wait,  my quickest and most honest answer would often be, no.

So what exactly will I be willing to wait in line for, and how long?  I did a quick research on stuff that ordinary, impatient people like me hate waiting for – and how long we will actually wait for these things before we start growing fangs and talons (haha!) – and the list did not surprise me at all.

If you can compare your patience to a frayed rope hoisting a piano from the ground floor to the eighth floor of a building, then this article is for you.  Enjoy!

  1. A car in front of you when the light turns green – 50 seconds.

traffic light green

Really?  It honestly feels more like 10 (or maybe even less!), especially here in Manila where red lights are more like suggestions to stop rather than a stern order to completely stop, no matter what.

  1. People talking in a movie – 1 minute, 52 seconds.

theatre-text

Why people even do this is beyond me.  If you wanted to talk, then go to a café or a restaurant – not in a theater where people paid to see a movie they wish to process on their own.

In my personal experience, a neighbor in a movie theater need not even start talking to rile me.  All they have to do is activate their mobile phones and flood my peripheral vision with the white light from their phone’s screen and it’s, well, you could say showtime.

 3. Babies crying their eyes out in public places (like a plane, or in church) – 2 minutes, 41 seconds.

baby

I don’t have kids but I know how difficult it is to quiet down a baby that couldn’t articulate what it wants or needs, or both.  I could probably give parents all the time they need to get their babies to stop crying and kicking.

I have never given a parent a dirty look just because his baby’s cries are starting to get on my nerves.  I just think it’s the last thing every exasperated parent needs.

  1. Waiting at the doctor’s office – 32 minutes.

Doctor's Office

See???

Was it wrong for me to feel like I’ve been somewhat cheated when I realized that it took all of 90 long and precious minutes before my doctor could see me?  I guess not.

  1. Waiting for the boyfriend/girlfriend to get ready – 21 minutes.

skeleton

Papunta ka pa lang, nakaligo na ako.

I guess this is rather subjective since our level of love and understanding for our significant others vary.  21 minutes, though, is long enough for someone to get him or herself ready for a dinner or movie date.  Otherwise, we’re staying in or breaking up.

  1. Transacting at a government office – 30 minutes

nbi

I think Pinoys are wired to agree to wait when he knows he is dealing with a government agency (or with government employees).  With all the red tape going on in these offices (that they, of course, vehemently deny), it is impossible to get anything done in under 30 minutes.

Getting a copy of your birth certificate at PSA? Half-day, give or take.

Applying for a student permit or driver’s license at the LTO? Not sure, but better pack your lunch and a good book.

Renewing your business permit at the DTI (or their satellite offices)? Be at their satellite offices (usually in malls) at the crack of dawn and make sure you have all the necessary documents otherwise, you go back to the end of the line to wait today, tomorrow, and for all eternity.

  1. Traffic – who knows?

traffic

Maybe I should ask you, what was the longest time you had to sit helplessly in traffic?

I guess there really isn’t much you can do when you find yourself right smack in the middle of slow-moving vehicles in EDSA or worse, at a complete stop in some side street that was supposed to take you to work faster.

The secret is simple: leave early.  Whether you’re driving your own car or taking public transport, allow, at best, two hours for travel and traffic; four at worst.

And then again, you can move to a remote province or go abroad to countries like Canada where they need more people to occupy their idle spaces. Haha.

So what would you wait in line for, and for how long?  We’d love to know.

03 - 13

A Senior Citizen ID card holder may enjoy two free movies at cinemas in Quezon City on specific days.  When dining or buying medicines, they are granted a 20% discount off of the cost of their meals and medications.  They are also given priority seats in public transportation and are granted the best slots in parking areas.

All’s well until they find themselves lined up at grocery counters.  Most first time SC card holders are surprised to find out that the 20% discount and VAT exemption applied on certain goods and services for use and enjoyment of Senior Citizens are not applicable on grocery items.

What are the discountable goods and services mentioned in the Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2000?

Our research on this topic led us back to the RA 9994 or the Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2000 where it is clearly emphasized that the 20% discount and VAT exemption are applicable to the charges on the following goods and services ONLY:

  1. Medicines, including the purchase of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines and such other essential medical supplies, accessories, and equipment to be determined by the Department of Health (DOH);
  2. Professional fees of attending physicians in all private hospitals, medical facilities, outpatient clinics, and home health  care services;
  3. Professional fees of licensed professional health providing home health care services as endorsed by private hospitals or employed through home health care employment agencies;
  4. Medical and dental services, diagnostic and laboratory fees in all private hospitals, medical facilities, outpatient clinics, and home health care services, in accordance with the rules and regulations to be issued by the DOH, in coordination with Philhealth;
  5. Actual fare for land transportation travel in public utility buses, public utility jeepneys, taxis, AUVs, trains;
  6. Actual transportation fare for domestic air transport services and sea shipping vessels and the like, based on the actual fare and advanced booking;
  7. Utilization of services in hotels and similar lodging establishments, restaurants, and recreation centers;
  8. Admission fees charged by theaters, cinema houses, and concert halls, circuses, leisure and amusement, and
  9. Funeral and burial services for the death of the senior citizen.

The 5% Discount on Basic Commodities

While the 20% Senior Citizen discount is not applicable on grocery items, Senior Citizens may demand for the 5% discount for certain grocery purchases that fall under the “basic necessities and prime commodities” category.

According to DTI-DA Administrative Order No. 10-02, Senior Citizens are entitled to a special discount of 5% of the regular retail price, without exemption from value-added tax, of basic necessities, such as:

  1. Rice
  2. Corn
  3. Bread (any shape and name, excluding pastries and cakes)
  4. Fresh, dried, and canned fish and other marine products
  5. Fresh pork, beef, and poultry meat
  6. Fresh eggs
  7. Fresh and processed milk
  8. Fresh vegetables including root crops
  9. Coffee and creamer
  10. Sugar
  11. Cooking oil
  12. Salt
  13. Powdered, liquid, bar laundry and detergent soap
  14. Firewood
  15. Charcoal
  16. Candles
  17. Fresh fruits
  18. Flour
  19. Dried, processed, and canned pork, beef and poultry meat
  20. Dairy products
  21. Noodles
  22. Onions
  23. Garlic
  24. Geriatric diapers
  25. Herbicides
  26. Poultry, swine, and cattle feeds
  27. Veterinary products of poultry, swine, and cattle
  28. Nipa shingle, plyboard, and construction nails
  29. Batteries
  30. Electrical supplies and light bulbs
  31. Steel wire

Can Senior Citizens avail of the 5% special discount on these items anytime?

This is where it gets a bit tricky.

When availing of the 5% special discount, the total amount of the purchase must not exceed Php 1,300 per calendar week.  The unused amount for the current week shall not be carried over to the following week.  Be reminded as well that the items must be commensurate to the personal and exclusive consumption of the senior citizen within the calendar week and that the amount allocated shall be spent on at least four (4) kinds of items only.

This is also the reason why most cities and municipalities require Senior Citizens to present, not just their IDs, but their Senior Citizen booklets as well.  This is their way of monitoring the purchases made by the Senior Citizen and if he may still avail of the 5% special discount for a particular week.

Sources:

http://www.gov.ph/services/senior-citizens/

http://www.manilatimes.net/senior-citizens-entitled-to-5-discount-for-grocery-items/220815/

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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02-16

A common requirement when travelling abroad are DFA-authenticated IDs and documents.  Whether you are traveling as a tourist, an overseas worker, or an exchange student, you will be required to have certain supporting documents “red-ribboned” by the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Here is a summary of the processes and requirements involved when having your documents authenticated.  Certain agencies handle the submission of the documents for authentication to the DFA.  For easier reference, we separated the documents that need to be hand-carried by the applicant to the DFA and those that will be handled by the agency.

General Procedure:

Step 1: Fill out an application form.

Step 2: Present a valid ID upon submission of the documents to the Processing Window.

Step 3: Pay appropriate Authentication Fees:

a. Php 100 / document (4 days processing)

b. Php 200 / document (1 day processing)

Step 4: Return the Duplicate copy of the receipt to the Processing Window.

Step 5: Claim the Authenticated document on the release date; simply present the machine-validated receipt at the releasing window.

Requirements for Authentication of Documents: APPLICANTS TO HAND-CARRY THESE DOCUMENTS TO THE DFA

  1. Birth / Marriage / Death Certificate and Certificate of No Marriage (CENOMAR).
    • Certificates must be in Security Paper issued by the PSA or must have been certified / authenticated by the PSA.
    • Local Civl Regsitrar (LCR) copy of Marriage Certificate, Birth Certificate, or Death Certificate may be required in cases when entries on the PSA copy are unreadable.
  2. Transcript of Records (TOR) and Diploma (For State Colleges and Universities)
    • Certified True Copies from the school
    • Secure Certificate of Authentication and Verification (CAV) from the school signed by the School/University Registrar.
  3. Form 137 and Diploma (High School and Elementary Level)
    • Certified True Copies from the school
    • School Principal’s Certification
    • Division Superintendent’s endorsement to Dep-Ed Regional Office
    • Certification (CAV) from Dep-Ed Regional Office
  4. Certificate of Employment / Trainings / Seminars, Baptismal Certificate and other documents issued by a private entity.
    • Applicant must first secure an affidavit, stating necessary factual circumstances and indicating certificates as annex or attachment.
    • Affidavit must be notarized.
    • Applicant must secure Certificate of Authority for a Notarial Act (CANA) signed by the Executive Judge or Vice Executive Judge from the Regional Trial Court which issued the commission of the Notary Public. (Copy of Notarial Commission is not the same as Certificate of Authority for a Notarial Act).
  5. Other Notarized Documents (Special Powers of Attorney (SPA) / Affidavit of Consent / Invitation / Guarantee / MOA, etc.)
    • After document is notarized, applicant must secure Certificate of Authority for a Notarial Act (CANA) signed by the Executive Judge or Vice Executive Judge from the Regional Trial Court which issued the commission of the Notary Public.
  6. Court Decisions / Resolutions / Orders
    • Applicant must present certified true copies of the decision, resolution, or order.
    • Applicant must secure copy of specimen signature of the court personnel who signed the certified copies from the Office of Administrative Services (Supreme Court – located beside PGH).
    • Applicant may be required to submit annotated marriage certificate in cases regarding decision of finality of annulment.
  7. Immigration Records
    • Certified / Authenticated by the Bureau of Immigration (BI).
  8. DSWD Clearances
    • Travel Clearances for minors directly issued by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD).
  9. NBI Clearances
    • NBI Clearances for travel abroad must be issued by the National Bureau of Investigation (Green).
  10. Police Clearances
    • Police Clearance signed by the Chief of Police issued by the Philippine National Police in various police stations nationwide, usually by the police precinct which has jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence or applicant may opt to secure police certification from Camp Crame.
  11. Barangay Clearances
    • Clearances issued by the barangay which has jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence and must have been authenticated by the office of the Mayor which has jurisdiction over the barangay.
  12. Export Documents
    • Must be authenticated by the Philippine Chamber of Commerce (PCCI), the Department of Health (DOH), Department of Agriculture (DA), or by the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD), depending on the nature of the document
  13. Business Registration and Other Documents issued by a Government Agency (e.g. SEC, DTI, BIR, Municipal Business Permit and Licensing Office, etc.)
    • Secure certified true copy from the issuing office.
  14. Foreign Documents
    • A Philippine Embassy or Philippine Consulate General in the country from where the document originated or by the said country’s Embassy or Consulate General based in the Philippines must have authenticated these documents.

Requirements for Authentication of Documents: SUBMISSION OF DOCUMENTS TO DFA IS HANDLED BY THE GOVERNMENT AGENCY

The applicant will be issued a claim stub which he needs to bring to the DFA when claiming his authenticated document.

  1. Transcript of Records (TOR) and Diploma (Collegiate Level)
    • Certified True Copies from the school.
    • Secure Certificate of Authentication and Verification (CAV) from the Commission on Higher Education (CHED).
  2. Transcript of Records (TOR) and Diploma (Technical or Vocational Courses)
    • Certified True Copies from the school
    • Secure Certificate of Authentication and Verification (CAV) from Technical Education and Skills Development Authority or TESDA.
  3. Medical / AIDS Free Certificate
    • Authenticated by the Department of Health (DOH) and applicable only for use to the following countries:
      • Spain
      • Palau
      • Libya
      • Oman
      • Cuba
      • Portugal
      • Greece
      • Cyprus
      • Angola
  4. Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP) issued licenses.
    • Authenticated by CAAP
  5. Driver’s Licenses
    • Applicant must first secure certification from Land Transportation Office (LTO Main Branch only).
  6. Professional Licenses / Board Certificates / Board Ratings / Certifications
    • Certified True Copies must be authenticated by  Professional Regulations Commission (PRC).

All unclaimed authenticated documents will be disposed of by the DFA after three months so make sure to claim your documents on the date reflected on your claim stub.

Source: http://dfa.gov.ph/procedures

Chips And Nibblers (1)

Closet Queen

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Exact Change Is Coming

Exact Change

Bawal na ang hindi pagbibigay ng tamang sukli sa mga mamimili.

Ang ‘No Shortchanging Act’ ang nag-uutos sa lahat ng mga business establishments na ibigay ang tamang sukli sa mga mamimili.  Ang sino mang mapatunayang lumalabag sa utos na ito ay maaaring pagbayarin ng multa na aabot ng P25,000 o 10% ng kanilang gross sales.  Pwede ring ipasara ang kanilang negosyo.

Ipinag-uutos din ng batas na ito ang paglagay ng mga price tags sa mga produkto at ang mga buwis na naka-incorporate sa presyo ng produkto o serbisyo na binabayaran ng mamimili.

Maaaring i-report ang mga paglabag sa batas na ito sa Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) sa loob ng 10 araw mula ang transaksyon.  Iimbestigahan ito ng DTI at kung mapapatunayang may pagkukulang ang business establishment, ipapataw ang karampatang parusa sa loob ng 30 araw.

Narito ang listahan ng mga multa na maaaring harapin ng sino mang lalabag sa No Shortchanging Act:

First Offense P500 or 3% of gross sales, whichever is higher.
Second Offense P5,000 or 5% of gross sales, whichever is higher.
Third Offense P15,000 or 7% of gross sales, whichever is higher and suspension of operations for 3 months.
Fourth Offense P25,000 and closure of the establishment.

Inaasahang gagawa ng malawakang information campaign ang DTI para ipaalam sa lahat ang bagong batas na ito.

Sources:

http://digitaledition.philstar.com/articles/2016-07-31/news/establishments-now-required-to-give-customers-exact-change/161749

http://www.rappler.com/nation/141462-exact-change-law-lapses-into-law

Ad

Business Name.jpg

If you are venturing into a business for the first time, you need to know how to register this to make your business transactions legal. Do not run the risk of getting your business closed down due to incomplete registration requirements or not registering it at all.

The first thing you need to accomplish is your business name’s registration. There are two ways to do this: submission to the DTI office or registering online. If you choose to register online, visit this site: http://www.bnrs.dti.gov.ph/web/guest/registration. Read the Terms and Conditions and then click on the “I Agree” button to proceed to the registration page. Note that even if you finish the online process, you still need to submit the documentary requirements to DTI within 15 days after your online registration. Otherwise, your application will be considered abandoned.

What I am going to share here is the manual process to register a business name. These are lifted from: http://www.gov.ph/services/registration-business-name/

1.Choose a Business Name

We suggest you think of at least three business names in case your first preference cannot be registered.

If the name you have chosen is already similar or confusingly similar to a registered business name, your next preferred business name will be considered.

What is an acceptable business name?

In determining whether a proposed business name for a registration is acceptable, the following factors shall be considered:

The root word or words of the name shall be considered. (e.g. “Island” instead of “Islander”).

The business name should describe the nature of the business.

It should be comprised solely of any or all of the following:

Letter, numerals, and punctuation marks that are part of the English and Filipino language.

2. Search for a Business Name

An online search facility is provided in the WEBNRS for you to find registered business names in the Philippines. The search facility should not be used to determine the availability of a business name for registration. This can only be determined at the time of lodgment of an application to register a business name.

There are two search criteria available for the public, namely Begins With and Contains. You can conduct a search by typing the exact business name or a few words contained in a business name.

It would be best to enter the name you have chosen in the space provided exactly as you would like it to be registered.

Here is the online facility for checking business names: http://www.bnrs.dti.gov.ph/web/guest/search

3. Register Your Business Name

How do I complete the application?

Complete the BTRCP Form No. 16. Information marked with an asterisk (*) is a required field to be filled out. Otherwise, you will receive an error message prompting you to fill them before the succeeding page is displayed.

4. Submit Documentary Requirements

The list of documentary requirements to be submitted to the proper DTI Office where your business is located is indicated in the Transaction Reference Number (TRN) Acknowledgement found in the last page of the online application form.

The TRN Acknowledgement form should be signed and submitted to DTI also.

5. Pay Your Application

Payment of application fee can be made at the DTI office indicated in your Transaction Reference Number (TRN) acknowledgment form.

You have the option to pay through GCash. (To avail of GCash services, you have to register with Globe).

Business hours are Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm.

Be reminded that if your name is suggestive of alien nationality, you need to submit a PSA Birth Certificate (formerly NSO Birth Certificate), PRC ID, Voter’s ID, or Passport. It is best that you have at least one of these ready upon application.

You may access the list of documentary requirements here.

Bonjour. Mabuhay.

May Contact Center ng Bayan (CCB) na ginawa ang ating pamahalaan kung saan pwede tayong magsumbong ng reklamo natin sa serbisyo lalo na kung connected ito sa Anti-Red Tape Law or RA 9485 of 2007.

Below are some details regarding the CCB.

The Contact Center ng Bayan (CCB) is conceived to be the Philippine Government’s main helpdesk where citizens, civil society organizations, and other entities can voice their complaints and concerns with government agencies and gain access to information.

The CCB is a voice-based contact service that will operate Monday to Friday from 8:00am to 5:00pm. Additional contact channels, such as email and SMS Text will be implemented in the near future.

The CCB will have a special 1-6565 hotline number accessible to PLDT and Digitel Landlines nationwide. Callers will be charged P5.00 per call plus VAT. Callers will also have access to recorded Information-on-Demand from participating government agencies. The system will have a transfer feature that can route calls to a live agent if necessary. These agents will also have call transfer capability that will allow calls to be routed to specialist agents at the Civil Service Commission, the National Computer Center, the Bureau of Internal Revenue, PhilHealth, the Department of Health, and the Department of Trade and Industry.

The CCB will also have the website www.contactcenterngbayan.gov.ph that will support the main operations of the CCB by providing static information about the CCB member government agencies. The information will be updated on a regular basis to ensure that information is always current.

The Contact Center ng Bayan is present to provide an avenue for the public to air out concerns on the quality of frontline service delivery by government personnel and any other violations of the Republic Act No. 9845 or the Anti-Red Tape Act of 2007 (ARTA) for resolution, insighting, and process  improvement.

It is also able to provide information about government agency policies and procedures initially focused on the Civil Service Commission, the National Computer Center, the Bureau of Internal Revenue, PhilHealth, the Department of Health, and the Department of Trade and Industry, who are all part of the CCB.

Tawag na kung may concern ka 🙂

 

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