Category: citizenservices.com.ph


July 12

A child must be registered at the Local Civil Registry office within 30 days after his birth.  If the parents fail to do that, the child will not have a valid birth certificate and there will be no basis for the details of his birth.

If you register your child beyond the 30-day deadline, his birth certificate will be tagged “Delayed Registration” or “Late Registration”.  Apart from the customary information you need to provide on the certificate such as the name, birth date and birthplace, and parents’ information, you also need to state why you failed to register the child’s birth on time.

Any person who has never had a birth certificate may file for the late registration of his birth, anytime.  What is important is that you be able to secure an authenticated copy of the birth certificate, making sure that you are properly registered as a citizen of the Philippines.

If you want to know more about late registration of birth, here is a comprehensive article we found in the Citizen Services website.

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July 10

I always thought that if a child is born out of wedlock, the baby automatically carries its mother’s maiden last name (while his middle name is left blank, otherwise, the baby and the mom will appear to be siblings).  Only when the baby’s parents marry will the child have the legal right to adopt the father’s last name.

Apparently, this is not always the case.  Some children are able to carry their father’s last name on their birth certificate even if their parents are not yet married.

How is this possible?

Citizen Services’ Bright Baby has the answer. Click this link!

July 09 (1)

Any misspelled entry in your child’s birth records can and will cause him a lot of trouble in the future.  It is always best to have these corrected as soon as possible to avoid inconsistencies in your child’s records, especially when he starts going to school.

There are two types of corrections that can be done on any erroneous birth certificate: the types of corrections that can be rectified by the LCR through a petition for correction of clerical error, and the ones that need to undergo a court proceeding (in which case, you may have to hire the services of a lawyer).  If the correction is a typo error, the LCR will only require you to file a petition for correction where you only need to execute an affidavit, pay minimal fees, and wait for the LCR to release the corrected copy of the certificate.  If the case involves changing the name, or if the correction will result to a new name altogether (example: the child’s name is Michelle, but the name on the birth certificate is Richelle which is also a valid name, changing the “R” to an “M” will result to a new name), the LCR may recommend for a Change of Name (instead of a simple petition for correction) and therefore, the petitioners will have to go through the whole nine yards – filing the case, court hearings, attorney’s fees, and the like.

I found a website that can help you better understand the intricacies of correcting errors in your child’s birth certificate.  This site has helped me and a lot of my relatives address minor glitches in our civil registry records.  If you have any problems with your child’s birth records, visit www.citizenservices.com.ph  or better yet, click this link that will take you directly to their article on correcting baby’s names.

Have a productive day!

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July 03

The DFA has made some changes in the usual process of reserving an appointment slot for your passport application (or renewal).  If you are setting an appointment at any of the DFA offices and satellite branches within Metro Manila, you will be required to pay for your passport fee using the DFA ePayment Portal before the system secures your slot.

If you want to know more about this new process (and to save you the hassle of running back and forth because you “were not informed”), click this link that will take you to the complete step-by-step procedure.  This is a website I discovered in one of my many. many research and realized that they have everything I need to know about my government-issued IDs such as my passport.

Take note that this is applicable for Metro Manila appointments for now; the DFA is working at having this implemented in the entire country within the year.

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June 25a

My sister gave birth last March to twins.  It was her first pregnancy which means that she had to learn all the things that came with it, twice (changing diapers, breastfeeding, etc.).  She said that from the moment her doctor confirmed she was pregnant, she felt as if she was seeing, hearing, tasting, and feeling everything around her for the first time.  Poor girl.

After she gave birth and had somehow adjusted to the life of being a brand new mom, she realized she needed to accomplish one more important thing: she needs to register her babies’ births!

Since she hardly had time to sit and browse through the internet, I volunteered to help her find out how she can have her babies registered at the Local Civil Registry (LCR).

It was then that I came across www.citizenservices.com.ph, an informative website that has the complete (and simplified!) list of things you need to prepare and do when registering your newborn at the LCR.  The information I needed I found under their Mommy Helpline link and if you are first-time Mom, you might want to bookmark this page because they have ALL the things you need to know about preparing your children’s important documents and IDs (like getting his first passport!).   So I simply copy-pasted the instructions and sent it to my sister who was only too glad to receive any kind of help (poor thing!).   Well, in a couple of days after receiving my message, her twins’ birth papers have been registered by my brother-in-law.  Yay!

If you need the same information, click on this link and look under Mommy Helpline.

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