Archive for January, 2020


What Would You Wait In Line For?

1 Jan 29

Last Thursday, I found myself in a 90-minute line to see my obstetrician.  My high school best friend was in the area and she volunteered to accompany me while I waited for my turn.  Neither of us knew much about it but we were more than willing to endure the long wait as it gave us all the time we needed to catch up on each other’s lives.  I actually did not realize I sat in that long line for almost two hours until I saw the wall clock inside the doctor’s clinic when they finally called my name.  I shook my head in disbelief and silently thanked the heavens for sending my best friend right when I needed her the most. Because without her, I might have marched out of that line and went straight to emergency where a doctor is almost always available to see you — no way I am waiting for anybody for 90 minutes!

How many times have we been told to please wait, please hold, be patient, hold on just a little while longer?  And just how many times did we agree to do just that… sit still and wait?  I don’t remember the last time I agreed to a fast-food cashier’s “Willing to wait, Ma’am?” for my fried chicken meal.  In fact, every time I am asked if I am willing to wait,  my quickest and most honest answer would often be, no.

So what exactly will I be willing to wait in line for, and how long?  I did a quick research on stuff that ordinary, impatient people like me hate waiting for – and how long we will actually wait for these things before we start growing fangs and talons (haha!) – and the list did not surprise me at all.

If you can compare your patience to a frayed rope hoisting a piano from the ground floor to the eighth floor of a building, then this article is for you.  Enjoy!

  1. A car in front of you when the light turns green – 50 seconds.

traffic light green

Really?  It honestly feels more like 10 (or maybe even less!), especially here in Manila where red lights are more like suggestions to stop rather than a stern order to completely stop, no matter what.

  1. People talking in a movie – 1 minute, 52 seconds.

theatre-text

Why people even do this is beyond me.  If you wanted to talk, then go to a café or a restaurant – not in a theater where people paid to see a movie they wish to process on their own.

In my personal experience, a neighbor in a movie theater need not even start talking to rile me.  All they have to do is activate their mobile phones and flood my peripheral vision with the white light from their phone’s screen and it’s, well, you could say showtime.

 3. Babies crying their eyes out in public places (like a plane, or in church) – 2 minutes, 41 seconds.

baby

I don’t have kids but I know how difficult it is to quiet down a baby that couldn’t articulate what it wants or needs, or both.  I could probably give parents all the time they need to get their babies to stop crying and kicking.

I have never given a parent a dirty look just because his baby’s cries are starting to get on my nerves.  I just think it’s the last thing every exasperated parent needs.

  1. Waiting at the doctor’s office – 32 minutes.

Doctor's Office

See???

Was it wrong for me to feel like I’ve been somewhat cheated when I realized that it took all of 90 long and precious minutes before my doctor could see me?  I guess not.

  1. Waiting for the boyfriend/girlfriend to get ready – 21 minutes.

skeleton

Papunta ka pa lang, nakaligo na ako.

I guess this is rather subjective since our level of love and understanding for our significant others vary.  21 minutes, though, is long enough for someone to get him or herself ready for a dinner or movie date.  Otherwise, we’re staying in or breaking up.

  1. Transacting at a government office – 30 minutes

nbi

I think Pinoys are wired to agree to wait when he knows he is dealing with a government agency (or with government employees).  With all the red tape going on in these offices (that they, of course, vehemently deny), it is impossible to get anything done in under 30 minutes.

Getting a copy of your birth certificate at PSA? Half-day, give or take.

Applying for a student permit or driver’s license at the LTO? Not sure, but better pack your lunch and a good book.

Renewing your business permit at the DTI (or their satellite offices)? Be at their satellite offices (usually in malls) at the crack of dawn and make sure you have all the necessary documents otherwise, you go back to the end of the line to wait today, tomorrow, and for all eternity.

  1. Traffic – who knows?

traffic

Maybe I should ask you, what was the longest time you had to sit helplessly in traffic?

I guess there really isn’t much you can do when you find yourself right smack in the middle of slow-moving vehicles in EDSA or worse, at a complete stop in some side street that was supposed to take you to work faster.

The secret is simple: leave early.  Whether you’re driving your own car or taking public transport, allow, at best, two hours for travel and traffic; four at worst.

And then again, you can move to a remote province or go abroad to countries like Canada where they need more people to occupy their idle spaces. Haha.

So what would you wait in line for, and for how long?  We’d love to know.

1 Jan 03

Are you one of the many Filipinos who tried requesting for a copy of their birth certificate at the PSA and got a negative certificate instead?  If you get a negative certificate, it means that the PSA does not have a record of your civil registry document in their files.

This could be disheartening at first, but the good news is, there is a solution to this common birth certificate problem.  We are sharing an in-depth guide on how to file for late registration of birth so you could finally have your very own PSA birth certificate.

Before we go any further though, let me tell you that filing for late registration of birth with the intention of changing or correcting any information in your registered birth certificate is WRONG.  This will only result in more confusion on your civil registry records and might invalidate your personal identification documents in the future.  There are various ways you can correct the wrong information in your birth or marriage certificates, most of these we have featured in our blog.  You can also ask the Local Civil Registry (LCR) for the best solution to your birth certificate problem.

3 Steps for Late Registration of Birth Certificate:

  1. Confirm with the LCR that your birth is truly unregistered.

When you receive a negative report from the PSA, it does not automatically mean that you do not have a birth certificate. It could also mean that the local copy of your birth certificate was not forwarded to the PSA and that is why the PSA could not find your record in their files.

So first, visit the LCR of your birthplace and ask for a local copy of your birth certificate.  If they are able to find your records, have them endorse that to the PSA so you can get a PSA-certified copy of your birth certificate.  This process usually takes one month to complete and you need to visit the PSA’s main office in East Avenue, Quezon City for the first copy of your PSA birth certificate.

However, if the LCR could not find a local copy of your birth certificate, it means that your birth was not reported and you truly do not have a birth certificate.  This shall be your basis for applying for delayed or late registration of birth.

  1. Get the list of requirements for late registration of birth.

The requirements and fees for late registration of birth vary per municipality.  You can either check online or visit the municipal or city hall of your birthplace to get the most updated list.  Below is the list of requirements from the Quezon City hall (you can use this as basis, however, your birthplace’s municipal hall may still require more or lesser documents from this list):

  • Negative Certification from the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA)
  • If the child is LEGITIMATE:
    • Original copy of Baptismal Certificate and
    • Parents’ PSA Marriage Contract
  • If the child is ILLEGITIMATE:
    • Original copy of Baptismal Certificate and
    • Joint Affidavit of two (2) Disinterested persons.
    • Acknowledgment through documents (if father/mother or both parents are deceased).
      • Insurance
      • School Report Card
      • Title of House and Lot
      • Certified True Copy of Death Certificate

Fees:

The fees for late registration of birth varies depending on the location and even age of the applicant.  A good example is in Makati where if the applicant is below 2 years old, the filing fee is Php 200; however, if the applicant is 2 years old or older, the fee is Php 500.

Again, the requirements (and fees) may vary depending on the municipal or city hall you are transacting with.  So it is best that you inquire first before working at completing your documents.

  1. Submit the complete set of documentary requirements at the LCR.

Late registration of birth must be filed at the LCR with jurisdiction over the place of birth of the unregistered person.  However, if you no longer reside in your birthplace, you may file an Out-of-town Late Registration or Reporting of Birth at the nearest LCR to your place of residence.  They should be able to process and transmit your documents to the LCR of your birthplace.  You need only to pay an Endorsement Fee of about Php 290 to complete the out-of-town transaction.

You may claim the first copy of your PSA birth certificate at the PSA’s main office in East Avenue, Quezon City.  This usually takes 3 to 6 months to complete.

If you have more questions about late registration of birth, you can send us an email and we will do our best to find the most appropriate answer for you.

Sources:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.quezoncity.gov.ph

www.makati.gov.ph

1 Jan 03 C

Parents are obligated to register their babies as soon as possible, after birth.  By law, you should be able to properly register the details of your child’s birth within 30 days from the date of his birth.

Here’s how:

How to register a newborn baby born in a hospital:

  1. Be ready with your baby’s name.

The parent or parents should have already decided on the baby’s name weeks before it is born.  Write it on a piece of paper or save it in your phone’s note app so that the nurses and other attending personnel at the hospital would know how to spell your child’s name.

For your child’s sake, avoid giving him or her a complicated name – one that is too long and hard to spell.  You are only increasing the risk of the baby’s name getting misspelled in his or her Certificate of Live Birth and in other transactions as he or she grows up.

  1. Prepare the documentary requirements in advance.

Among the documents that the hospital may require from you are:

  1. PSA Marriage Certificate of parents (if married)
  2. Affidavit of Admission of Paternity filled out and signed by the father (if parents are not married but the father wants the child to use his last name).
  3. Private Handwritten Instrument or an official document that is handwritten and signed by the father to prove that he wholeheartedly recognizes the paternity of the child during his lifetime (again, if the parents are not married but the father would like to recognize the child as his and allows the child to use his last name in the birth certificate).
  4. Affidavit to Use the Surname of the Father filled out and signed by the father (the blank form will be provided by the hospital).
  5. Photocopies of the parents’ valid IDs.
  6. SSS, PhilHealth, and health insurance/HMO claim forms.

The affidavits executed by the biological father (in case the child is born illegitimate) shall be permanently attached to the child’s birth certificate.

  1. Accomplish the Certificate of Live Birth (COLB) Form.

The details of the birth, such as date and hour of birth, names of attending doctors and nurses, weight and gender of the baby, shall be provided by the attending physician, nurse, or hospital administrator.  When the parents are handed the COLB, these details must already be clearly written on the form.

The parents shall fill out the rest of the form, including:

  • Name of the baby.
  • Complete names of parents (as they appear on the parents’ PSA marriage certificate and individual PSA birth certificates).
  • Parents’ religion, occupation, citizenship, date, and place of marriage (if the parents are married).

Double-check all entries before submitting the form to the hospital administrator.  Any misspelled name or address, or incorrect dates, initials, or any other detail, shall remain as is (incorrect or misspelled) until your child’s birth certificate is submitted to and certified by the PSA.  These mistakes could cause tremendous problems to your child in the future while some might even have to go through court hearings just to rectify the errors.  So take time to review all entries in your child’s birth certificate before submitting them to the hospital.

The hospital should be able to submit the accomplished COLB to the local civil registrar (LCR) within 30 days after the child’s birth date, otherwise, the child’s registration shall be marked late.

  1. Secure your copy of your child’s Certificate of Live Birth (COLB).

This should be the same copy received by the LCR and duly submitted by the hospital where you gave birth.  If the hospital has not contacted you regarding this 30 days after you give birth, follow it up with them.

The LCR’s job is to endorse your child’s COLB to the PSA so that your child would have a PSA-certified birth certificate.

  1. Get a copy of your child’s PSA Birth Certificate.

The process of endorsing and generating a PSA birth certificate takes about 3 to 6 months to complete.  It would be safe to start checking with the PSA four months after you give birth (assuming the LCR has diligently submitted your child’s COLB on time.).

Your child’s first PSA birth certificate may be obtained at the PSA main office in East Avenue, Quezon City.

We shall also feature the process on how to register a baby’s birth if he or she is born at home.

If you have any questions about birth certificate registration, just drop us a line and we will do our best to find the answers for you.

Source:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.filipiknow.net

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1 Jan 03 B

A CENOMARor Certificate of No Marriage is a primary documentary requirement for those who are planning to get married.  It serves as proof that you or your would-be spouse is legally single – never contracted marriage or a previous marriage has been annulled.  It basically tells you if you are free to marry another person.

The CENOMARfollows a 6-month validity period and may be needed as early as when you file your application for a marriage license.  There are two ways you can get a copy of your CENOMARfrom the PSA: you can either go directly to any PSA office near your area or you can order it online at PSAHelpline.ph and have it delivered to your home or office.

How to get your CENOMAR at the PSA:

Requirements:

  • Duly accomplished CENOMARapplication form.
  • Present at least one valid ID:
    • Company ID
    • SSS/GSIS/Philhealth/Pag-IBIG ID
    • Driver’s License
    • Passport
    • PRC ID
    • Senior Citizen’s ID
    • Voter’s ID
    • NBI Clearance
    • PhilPost ID
    • PWD ID
  • If you are getting the CENOMAR of another person, you need to present an authorization letter signed by the owner.
  • Prepare P210.00 per copy of CENOMAR as a processing/application fee.  Pay only at the PSA cashier and make sure you are issued a government receipt. Never transact with fixers.
  • The CENOMAR may be released to you on the same day or may take as long as 10 days.

How to get your CENOMAR online through PSAHelpline.ph

There are three ways you can order your PSA CENOMAR from PSAHelplinePSAHelpline:

A CENOMAR costs Php 465.00 when you order through PSAHelpline (through any of the above channels).  That amount already includes the processing and delivery fees.  You can pay right at the website using your Visa or Mastercard credit card or at any of their partner payment facilities:

  • PNB
  • Metrobank
  • BDO
  • Bayad Center
  • ecPay at 7-11 stores
  • Bancnet ATMs
  • TouchPay

When ordering online, make sure to provide all the complete and correct details of the owner of the CENOMAR, including the correct delivery address, a working email address, and mobile and landline numbers for quick coordination with the courier on the day of delivery.

While the website and chat facilities are user-friendly, you might want to pay closer attention to the delivery guidelines.  Due to the Data Privacy Act, the PSA has implemented stricter measures to ensure that these civil registry documents are only delivered to its rightful owners or their authorized representatives.

For your benefit, I am including the list of IDs and documents you need to be able to present to the courier upon delivery of your ordered CENOMAR:

What are the necessary requirements to be presented when receiving the documents upon delivery?

If the person receiving the document is the owner of legal age or any of the Authorized persons (legal spouse, father, mother, son, or daughter of legal age), he or she should present a signed valid original ID.

If the receiving party is not one of the authorized persons, he/she needs to present the following:

  • An original signed letter of authorization (LOA) from the certificate owner of legal age/authorized persons (legal spouse, father, mother, son, or daughter, of legal age).
  • To present a signed, valid, original ID of the owner of legal age/authorized persons (legal spouse, father, mother, son, or daughter, of legal age).
  • A photocopy of the signed, valid, original ID of the owner of legal age/authorized persons (legal spouse, father, mother, son, or daughter, of legal age).
  • A photocopy of the signed valid original ID of the authorized representative.

Again, don’t wait until the last minute before you get a copy of your PSA certificates.  Always keep a copy in your files because you never know when you might need it for your transactions.

Sources:

www.psa.gov.ph

www.psahelpline.ph

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12 Dec 26 - A

Prepare your documentary requirements for the Midwives’ licensure examinations as the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) will start accepting the online processing of applications on January 8, 2020.  The easiest and most convenient way to get copies of your PSA birth and marriage certificates (which are primary requirements for online application) is by ordering through www.psahelpline.ph . You can order online through the website, or through their Facebook Messenger @PSAHelpline.phor by calling their 24/7 hotline at (02) 8737-1111.  They will deliver your PSA certificates so you don’t need to travel to a PSA office.

Here’s the complete list of requirements you need to have when applying for the PRC online processing:

  1. PSA birth certificate of the applicant.
  2. PSA marriage certificate (for married female applicants).
  3. Transcript of Records with scanned picture and remarks “For Board Examination Purposes”.
  • Must have a record of 20 deliveries actually handled and signed by Supervisor/Tutor.
  • Signatory of cases should have undergone the training and Expanded Functions under RA 7392.
  • Signed by Principal or Dean and duly notarized.
  • 5 sutures and 5 IVF insertion.
  • Repeaters: Case requirements done more than 5 years ago shall be repeated (new cases shall be submitted).
  • If the applicant is a Registered Nurse:
    • PRC IC card/TOR/Board Certificate
    • Record of 20 deliveries actually handled with records of five sutures and five intravenous injections signed by Hospital Director or Municipal Health Officer and duly notarized.
    • Certificate of consent (from the hospital where cases were performed).
    • Certificate of training on Expanded Function on RA 7392 accredited by PRC CPD Council for Midwifery of Registered Midwife who supervised (graduate midwife and RN).
    • PRC ID License and Employee’s ID of the Supervising Registered Midwife.
    • PRC ID License and Employee’s ID of the Certifying Officer (must be a registered physician.
  1. Payment of P600.00
  2. Exam Date: April 5 and 6, 2020 (Tuesday and Wednesday)
  3. Exam venues: NCR, Baguio, Cagayan De Oro, Cebu, Davao, Iloilo, Legaspi, Lucena, and Tacloban.
  4. Deadline of Filing Applications: March 9, 2020.
  5. Target Date of Release of Exam Results: April 13, 2020.

Source: www.prc.gov.ph

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