Archive for September 12, 2019


9 Sept 12a

Is this your first time to apply for a Philippine passport?  Not sure what documents and IDs to bring?  No idea how to set an online appointment?

We’re here to help!

Read on for the complete guide to applying for your very first passport at the DFA.

Requirements:

  1. You must have a confirmed online appointment with the DFA.
  • Logon to passport.gov.ph and click on the Schedule An Appointment link. Follow the instructions and step-by-step guide.
  • Pay your passport processing fee at any accredited DFA ePayment portal (the list will also be shown on the website and will be sent to your email.).
  • If you are a senior citizen, PWD, pregnant, a minor child, or a Solo Parent ID holder, you are exempted from making an online appointment and can proceed directly to the DFA office of your choice for a walk-in application.
  1. Printout of your passport appointment packet.
  • The link to the documents will be sent to you by the DFA to your email (the email address you provided during the online appointment).
  • Print the documents and bring these with you on the day of your appointment.
  1. Personal appearance at the DFA office of your choice.
  • You cannot send a representative to finish the application for you. If you fail to appear at the DFA on the date and time of your appointment, your application will be voided and you will not be able to apply for an online appointment for 30 days.
  1. Bring a valid ID (original and photocopy).
  • To be sure, bring more than one valid ID and reproduce each. Below is a list of acceptable IDs for passport application:
    • SSS ID
    • GSIS ID
    • UMID Card
    • PhlPost ID (postal ID)
    • COMELEC ID or Voter’s ID
    • Driver’s License
    • Senior Citizen ID
    • School ID (for students)
    • PRC ID
    • OWWA ID
    • PNP Firearms License
    • Airman License (issued August 2016 onwards)
  • The DFA DOES NOT accept PhilHealth ID and TIN ID.
  • NBI Clearance only serves as a supporting document.
  1. Bring an original copy of your PSA Birth Certificate.
  • It must be an original copy authenticated by the PSA and printed on SECPA.
  • You can order yours at psahelpline.ph
  • Alternatively, you can also present a Certified True Copy (CTC) of your birth certificate from the LCR of your birthplace.
  1. Married women must bring a copy of her PSA Marriage Certificate.
  • If you were married abroad, bring a copy of your Report of Marriage, authenticated by the PSA.
  • For women married to a foreign national, bring the original and photocopy of the Commission of Filipino Overseas (CFO) Guidance and Counseling Certificate of Attendance.

I hope this article helped you in preparing for your passport application.  Tomorrow, we are going to feature the passport requirements for minor children who are applying for a passport for the first time.

Visit us again!

Need quick facts about passport applications, requirements, and fees? Read this blog: QUICK FACTS FOR PASSPORT APPLICANTS AT THE DFA.

Source: www.dfa.gov.ph

www.passport.gov.ph

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9 Sept 12

Now here is a valid question that newly-annulled parents often ask us.  So we endeavored to gather the facts to try and answer this rather sad question (one of the saddest, if not the saddest). Our research led us to www.smartparenting.com.ph where the same question was raised and the answer was provided by one Atty. Nikki Jimeno.  We just wish to acknowledge and give them credit for the insightful article they published on their website.

Read on:

If the annulled couple’s marriage was proven to be void from the beginning, then their children are generally considered illegitimate.  What this actually means is that in the annulment process, it was proven that the marriage that the ex-couple had was essentially fake – and it is as if they were never married at all.  Therefore, their children are essentially born out of wedlock – illegitimate.

According to the Family Code of the Philippines, the following marriages are considered void from the beginning:

  • Contracted by any party below 18 even with the consent of parents or guardians;
  • solemnized by any person not legally authorized to perform a marriage unless either or both parties believed in good faith that the solemnizing officer had the legal authority to do so;
  • solemnized without a marriage license except those expressly exempted by law to secure a marriage license;
  • bigamous or polygamous marriages;
  • contracted through mistake of one of the contracting parties as to the identity of the other;
  • incestuous marriages as defined in Article 37 of the FC; and
  • void marriages by reason of public policy (i.e. between step-parents and step-children, between adopting parent and adopted child).

If, however, the marriage was valid but was later declared void due to the psychological incapacity of one or both of the spouses under Article 36 of the Family Code, the children are still considered legitimate.  This is because their parents’ marriage was legitimate, duly registered and acknowledged by the state and did not violate any provision in the Family Code.

Does my child need to drop his father’s last name after my annulment?

If you want your son to continue using his father’s last name, that is alright and permitted by law.  Illegitimate children are permitted to use their father’s last name as long as the biological father acknowledged his paternity over the child.  Only his birthright was affected by the annulment.

 

I want my child to be a legitimate child.

An unwed mother can adopt her own child and make his status legitimate, according to RA 8552 of the Domestic Adoption Act of 1998.  You need to seek the father’s consent and he must be willing to lose his parental authority over the child.  Essentially, your child will have to drop his biological father’s last name and use your maiden last name instead.

 

Source: www.smartparenting.com.ph

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