No BC_Illegitimate_No Mother

Alona is an illegitimate child, born to parents who were barely out of their teens.  Her mother gave her up for adoption when she was just a few days old, in exchange for a plane ticket from Manila to Iloilo.  She was never heard of from again.  Upon learning that his daughter was given to a complete stranger, Dexter (Alona’s father) requested for assistance from the barangay so he can take his daughter back.  After negotiating with the family who paid for Alona’s adoption, Dexter was finally able to take his daughter home and promised to do everything he can to raise her on his own.

Father and daughter sailed from Manila to Dumaguete and there, Alona grew up in her grandparents’ farm house while Dexter continued his studies in Cebu.

Alona is all grown up now and would like to apply for a passport so she can work abroad.  Her only problem is that she does not have a birth certificate and is clueless on how to get one.  Her father, Dexter, told her that she was born in Manila but since they have both migrated to Dumaguete, he is not sure if Alona’s birth can be registered in Dumaguete.

She has three problems:

  1. Alona does not have a birth certificate.
  2. She has not heard from her mother ever since she was born and in spite of several attempts to get in touch with her mother, all her efforts returned futile.
  3. She no longer lives in the city where she was born.

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) website (www.psa.gov.ph) , cases such as this can be worked out by filing for an Out-of-town (because she no longer lives in the city where she was born), Delayed Reporting of Birth.

The requirements for delayed registration of birth are in this previous article we posted last month.  Once Alona has these documents on hand, she can present these to the civil registrar of the LCRO of Dumaguete who shall then forward the documents to the Manila City Hall for proper registration.

Since Alona is an illegitimate child and born on September 21, 1990, there is the issue on her last name and her parents’ acknowledgment of her birth.  Only her father is present, and essentially, willing to acknowledge her as his child.

According to the PSA, if the child’s birth certificate is not yet registered and the father acknowledges his paternity over the child, the child can use the father’s last name following the procedures for R.A. 9255.

Since Dexter wanted for Alona to use his last name on her birth certificate, they need to include these documents when filing for Alona’s registration of birth:

  1. Affidavit to Use Surname of Father (AUSF)
  2. Consent of the child, if 18 years old and over at the time of the filing of the document (this applies to Alona).
  3. Any two of the following documents showing clearly the paternity between the father and the child:
    • Employment records
    • SSS / GSIS records
    • Insurance
    • Certificate of membership in any organization
    • Statement of Assets and Liabilities
    • Income Tax Return (ITR)

Sources:

https://psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/technical-notes-vital-statistics

http://www.psa.gov.ph/civilregistration/problems-and-solutions/birth-certificate-not-yet-registered-and-father

http://www.census.gov.ph/civilregistration/republic-act-9255

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